{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:sdoeden.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":515,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"sdoeden.areavoices.com/88153","permalink":"http://sdoeden.areavoices.com/2012/08/22/got-vegetables-make-soup/","blogid":"978","blogdomain":"sdoeden.areavoices.com","hostname":"sdoeden.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Got Vegetables? Make Soup","content":"\n\nIt can be a challenge cooking for two. When I made a big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack the other day, I had a lot of tender vegetables left over. I turned them into creamy soup in 30 minutes.\n\nThe thin slices of potatoes and tender ribbons of cabbage seemed to demand caraway, that distinctly flavored seed typically found in rye bread. I used to love ladling my mom's sauerkraut dotted with caraway seeds over creamy chunks of boiled potatoes.\n\nI started the soup by sauteing chopped onions and caraway seeds in hot oil. I tried a bit of the Butter Olive Oil I bought at Oh! Olive, a cute little shop in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago. The oil is organic with natural butter flavor, but is dairy-free and contains no animal products. I've discovered it's perfect for popping corn, or drizzling over a bowl of hot popped corn. Anyway, when the onions began to turn golden brown, I dumped in all my leftover vegetables (I had quite a bit -- only two of us ate a meal from that big pan of veggies), poured in a few cups of vegetable broth and let it all simmer together for about 20 minutes.\n\nThe potato slices were falling apart at that point and the green beans and carrots were very tender.\n\nI used my immersion blender to puree the soup right in the pot. Of course you could use your blender or food processor for the job. I wanted to have control over how chunky the final product would be. And then, I just stirred in about a cup of milk and seasoned to taste. A sprinkle of minced fresh parsley over the top gave it the final touch.\n\nThe soup was so satisfying. The dark caraway seeds softened during the saute and simmer and added that German-style flavor I remember from years of eating the sauerkraut and dumplings my mom used to make whenever she wanted to make my dad's day.\n\nEither use up some vegetables you've already cooked or follow the recipe below.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_88161\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"720\"] Turn leftover Baked Garden Vegetable Stack into Creamy Caraway Vegetable Soup.[/caption]\n\nI plan to bake another big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack, just so I can have more of those vegetables to turn into soup.\nCreamy Caraway Vegetable Soup\nFirst, cook the vegetables. Serve some up as part of a meal, then use the rest for soup. Here's how to bake the vegetables:\n\n\tOlive oil, for preparing pans\n\tYukon Gold potatoes, about 2 to 2½ pounds, peeled\n\tCarrots, about 1 pound, peeled\n\tOnion, 1 medium, sliced thin\n\tGreen Beans, 5 to 6 ounces, topped and tailed (trimmed), cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces\n\tCabbage, about 4 ounces, sliced thin\n\nPreheat oven to 400 degrees.\n\nPrepare 2 shallow baking pans or baking dishes that are the same size. Two jelly roll pans (11- x 15-inch) if you are feeding a family or 2 to 4 gratin dishes if you are cooking for one or two. Lightly coat the inside of each baking pan or dish with olive oil. Set aside.\n\nUse a sharp knife or a mandolin to slice Yukon Gold potatoes and carrots 1/8-inch thick, keeping them in separate piles.\n\nSalt and pepper the inside bottom of one pan. Arrange about half of the Yukon Gold potato slices, shingle style, in the prepared pan, covering the bottom completely. Make another layer with all of the carrots, arranging them the same way. Sprinkle the onion slices, green beans and cabbage over the potatoes. End the stack with a layer of the remaining Yukon Golds, arranging them shingle style. Push the mixture down with your hands to pack it in to the pan tightly.\n\nBrush olive oil over the top layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper.\n\nSet the other prepared pan upside down over the pan of vegetables. Wrap the pans up tight with heavy-duty aluminum foil to hold them securely together.\n\nBake in 400-degree preheated oven for 30 minutes. Carefully flip the pans over (be sure to use oven mitts) and bake for another 30 minutes.\n\nRemove from oven. Allow the baked stack to rest for 5 minutes, then very carefully remove aluminum foil.\n\nLift off the top baking pan. Lay a large cutting board over the top of the baked stack and flip the stack over onto the cutting board. Carefully remove the baking pan. Slice the hot stack into squares or rectangles and serve. Refrigerate leftovers to save for soup.\n\n\t2 tablespoons olive oil\n\t1 cup chopped onions\n\t2 teaspoons caraway seeds\n\t3 (approximately) cups vegetable broth\n\t1 cup dairy or non-dairy milk\n\tSalt and pepper, to taste\n\tMinced fresh parsley, for serving\n\nIn a large soup pot, heat the oil. Add the chopped onion and caraway seeds. Saute until onions just begin to turn golden brown. Add all of the leftover vegetables to the pot. Add enough broth to just cover the vegetables. Bring to a boil. Turn down heat, cover pot and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until potatoes are falling apart and cabbage and green beans are tender.\n\nAdd milk.\n\nPuree to desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle some fresh parsley on each serving. Makes about 6 servings, depending on how many vegetables you started with.\n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"\n\nIt can be a challenge cooking for two. When I made a big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack the other day, I had a lot of tender vegetables left over. I turned them into creamy soup in 30 minutes.\n\nThe thin slices of potatoes and tender ribbons of cabbage seemed to demand caraway, that distinctly flavored seed typically found in rye bread. I used to love ladling my mom's sauerkraut dotted with caraway seeds over creamy chunks of boiled potatoes.\n\nI started the soup by sauteing chopped onions and caraway seeds in hot oil. I tried a bit of the Butter Olive Oil I bought at Oh! Olive, a cute little shop in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago. The oil is organic with natural butter flavor, but is dairy-free and contains no animal products. I've discovered it's perfect for popping corn, or drizzling over a bowl of hot popped corn. Anyway, when the onions began to turn golden brown, I dumped in all my leftover vegetables (I had quite a bit -- only two of us ate a meal from that big pan of veggies), poured in a few cups of vegetable broth and let it all simmer together for about 20 minutes.\n\nThe potato slices were falling apart at that point and the green beans and carrots were very tender.\n\nI used my immersion blender to puree the soup right in the pot. Of course you could use your blender or food processor for the job. I wanted to have control over how chunky the final product would be. And then, I just stirred in about a cup of milk and seasoned to taste. A sprinkle of minced fresh parsley over the top gave it the final touch.\n\nThe soup was so satisfying. The dark caraway seeds softened during the saute and simmer and added that German-style flavor I remember from years of eating the sauerkraut and dumplings my mom used to make whenever she wanted to make my dad's day.\n\nEither use up some vegetables you've already cooked or follow the recipe below.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_88161\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"720\"] Turn leftover Baked Garden Vegetable Stack into Creamy Caraway Vegetable Soup.[/caption]\n\nI plan to bake another big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack, just so I can have more of those vegetables to turn into soup.\nCreamy Caraway Vegetable Soup\nFirst, cook the vegetables. Serve some up as part of a meal, then use the rest for soup. Here's how to bake the vegetables:\n\nOlive oil, for preparing pans\nYukon Gold potatoes, about 2 to 2 pounds, peeled\nCarrots, about 1 pound, peeled\nOnion, 1 medium, sliced thin\nGreen Beans, 5 to 6 ounces, topped and tailed (trimmed), cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces\nCabbage, about 4 ounces, sliced thin\n\nPreheat oven to 400 degrees.\n\nPrepare 2 shallow baking pans or baking dishes that are the same size. Two jelly roll pans (11- x 15-inch) if you are feeding a family or 2 to 4 gratin dishes if you are cooking for one or two. Lightly coat the inside of each baking pan or dish with olive oil. Set aside.\n\nUse a sharp knife or a mandolin to slice Yukon Gold potatoes and carrots 1/8-inch thick, keeping them in separate piles.\n\nSalt and pepper the inside bottom of one pan. Arrange about half of the Yukon Gold potato slices, shingle style, in the prepared pan, covering the bottom completely. Make another layer with all of the carrots, arranging them the same way. Sprinkle the onion slices, green beans and cabbage over the potatoes. End the stack with a layer of the remaining Yukon Golds, arranging them shingle style. Push the mixture down with your hands to pack it in to the pan tightly.\n\nBrush olive oil over the top layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper.\n\nSet the other prepared pan upside down over the pan of vegetables. Wrap the pans up tight with heavy-duty aluminum foil to hold them securely together.\n\nBake in 400-degree preheated oven for 30 minutes. Carefully flip the pans over (be sure to use oven mitts) and bake for another 30 minutes.\n\nRemove from oven. Allow the baked stack to rest for 5 minutes, then very carefully remove aluminum foil.\n\nLift off the top baking pan. Lay a large cutting board over the top of the baked stack and flip the stack over onto the cutting board. Carefully remove the baking pan. Slice the hot stack into squares or rectangles and serve. Refrigerate leftovers to save for soup.\n\n2 tablespoons olive oil\n1 cup chopped onions\n2 teaspoons caraway seeds\n3 (approximately) cups vegetable broth\n1 cup dairy or non-dairy milk\nSalt and pepper, to taste\nMinced fresh parsley, for serving\n\nIn a large soup pot, heat the oil. Add the chopped onion and caraway seeds. Saute until onions just begin to turn golden brown. Add all of the leftover vegetables to the pot. Add enough broth to just cover the vegetables. Bring to a boil. Turn down heat, cover pot and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until potatoes are falling apart and cabbage and green beans are tender.\n\nAdd milk.\n\nPuree to desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle some fresh parsley on each serving. Makes about 6 servings, depending on how many vegetables you started with.\n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\nIt can be a challenge cooking for two. When I made a big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack the other day, I had a lot of tender vegetables left over. I turned them into creamy soup in 30 minutes.\n\nThe thin slices of potatoes and tender ribbons of cabbage seemed to demand caraway, that distinctly flavored seed typically found in rye bread. I used to love ladling my mom's sauerkraut dotted with caraway seeds over creamy chunks of boiled potatoes.\n\nI started the soup by sauteing chopped onions and caraway seeds in hot oil. I tried a bit of the Butter Olive Oil I bought at Oh! Olive, a cute little shop in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago. The oil is organic with natural butter flavor, but is dairy-free and contains no animal products. I've discovered it's perfect for popping corn, or drizzling over a bowl of hot popped corn. Anyway, when the onions began to turn golden brown, I dumped in all my leftover vegetables (I had quite a bit -- only two of us ate a meal from that big pan of veggies), poured in a few cups of vegetable broth and let it all simmer together for about 20 minutes.\n\nThe potato slices were falling apart at that point and the green beans and carrots were very tender.\n\nI used my immersion blender to puree the soup right in the pot. Of course you could use your blender or food processor for the job. I wanted to have control over how chunky the final product would be. And then, I just stirred in about a cup of milk and seasoned to taste. A sprinkle of minced fresh parsley over the top gave it the final touch.\n\nThe soup was so satisfying. The dark caraway seeds softened during the saute and simmer and added that German-style flavor I remember from years of eating the sauerkraut and dumplings my mom used to make whenever she wanted to make my dad's day.\n\nEither use up some vegetables you've already cooked or follow the recipe below.\n\n\n\nI plan to bake another big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack, just so I can have more of those vegetables to turn into soup.\nCreamy Caraway Vegetable Soup\nFirst, cook the vegetables. Serve some up as part of a meal, then use the rest for soup. Here's how to bake the vegetables:\n\nOlive oil, for preparing pans\nYukon Gold potatoes, about 2 to 2 pounds, peeled\nCarrots, about 1 pound, peeled\nOnion, 1 medium, sliced thin\nGreen Beans, 5 to 6 ounces, topped and tailed (trimmed), cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces\nCabbage, about 4 ounces, sliced thin\n\nPreheat oven to 400 degrees.\n\nPrepare 2 shallow baking pans or baking dishes that are the same size. Two jelly roll pans (11- x 15-inch) if you are feeding a family or 2 to 4 gratin dishes if you are cooking for one or two. Lightly coat the inside of each baking pan or dish with olive oil. Set aside.\n\nUse a sharp knife or a mandolin to slice Yukon Gold potatoes and carrots 1/8-inch thick, keeping them in separate piles.\n\nSalt and pepper the inside bottom of one pan. Arrange about half of the Yukon Gold potato slices, shingle style, in the prepared pan, covering the bottom completely. Make another layer with all of the carrots, arranging them the same way. Sprinkle the onion slices, green beans and cabbage over the potatoes. End the stack with a layer of the remaining Yukon Golds, arranging them shingle style. Push the mixture down with your hands to pack it in to the pan tightly.\n\nBrush olive oil over the top layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper.\n\nSet the other prepared pan upside down over the pan of vegetables. Wrap the pans up tight with heavy-duty aluminum foil to hold them securely together.\n\nBake in 400-degree preheated oven for 30 minutes. Carefully flip the pans over (be sure to use oven mitts) and bake for another 30 minutes.\n\nRemove from oven. Allow the baked stack to rest for 5 minutes, then very carefully remove aluminum foil.\n\nLift off the top baking pan. Lay a large cutting board over the top of the baked stack and flip the stack over onto the cutting board. Carefully remove the baking pan. Slice the hot stack into squares or rectangles and serve. Refrigerate leftovers to save for soup.\n\n2 tablespoons olive oil\n1 cup chopped onions\n2 teaspoons caraway seeds\n3 (approximately) cups vegetable broth\n1 cup dairy or non-dairy milk\nSalt and pepper, to taste\nMinced fresh parsley, for serving\n\nIn a large soup pot, heat the oil. Add the chopped onion and caraway seeds. Saute until onions just begin to turn golden brown. Add all of the leftover vegetables to the pot. Add enough broth to just cover the vegetables. Bring to a boil. Turn down heat, cover pot and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until potatoes are falling apart and cabbage and green beans are tender.\n\nAdd milk.\n\nPuree to desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle some fresh parsley on each serving. Makes about 6 servings, depending on how many vegetables you started with.\n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"sdoeden","author_s":"http://sdoeden.areavoices.com/author/sdoeden/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-08-22T11:00:13Z","displaydate":"2012-08-22 06:00:13","displaymodified":"2012-08-21 20:50:28","tags":["Baked Garden Vegetable Stack","caraway seeds","food","german soup","Oh! Olive","recipe","Sue Doeden"],"categories":["healthful","lunch","meatless","soups and stews","supper","vegan"],"spell":["Got Vegetables? Make Soup","\n\nIt can be a challenge cooking for two. When I made a big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack the other day, I had a lot of tender vegetables left over. I turned them into creamy soup in 30 minutes.\n\nThe thin slices of potatoes and tender ribbons of cabbage seemed to demand caraway, that distinctly flavored seed typically found in rye bread. I used to love ladling my mom's sauerkraut dotted with caraway seeds over creamy chunks of boiled potatoes.\n\nI started the soup by sauteing chopped onions and caraway seeds in hot oil. I tried a bit of the Butter Olive Oil I bought at Oh! Olive, a cute little shop in the Lincoln Park neighborhood of Chicago. The oil is organic with natural butter flavor, but is dairy-free and contains no animal products. I've discovered it's perfect for popping corn, or drizzling over a bowl of hot popped corn. Anyway, when the onions began to turn golden brown, I dumped in all my leftover vegetables (I had quite a bit -- only two of us ate a meal from that big pan of veggies), poured in a few cups of vegetable broth and let it all simmer together for about 20 minutes.\n\nThe potato slices were falling apart at that point and the green beans and carrots were very tender.\n\nI used my immersion blender to puree the soup right in the pot. Of course you could use your blender or food processor for the job. I wanted to have control over how chunky the final product would be. And then, I just stirred in about a cup of milk and seasoned to taste. A sprinkle of minced fresh parsley over the top gave it the final touch.\n\nThe soup was so satisfying. The dark caraway seeds softened during the saute and simmer and added that German-style flavor I remember from years of eating the sauerkraut and dumplings my mom used to make whenever she wanted to make my dad's day.\n\nEither use up some vegetables you've already cooked or follow the recipe below.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_88161\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"720\"] Turn leftover Baked Garden Vegetable Stack into Creamy Caraway Vegetable Soup.[/caption]\n\nI plan to bake another big batch of Baked Garden Vegetable Stack, just so I can have more of those vegetables to turn into soup.\nCreamy Caraway Vegetable Soup\nFirst, cook the vegetables. Serve some up as part of a meal, then use the rest for soup. Here's how to bake the vegetables:\n\n\tOlive oil, for preparing pans\n\tYukon Gold potatoes, about 2 to 2½ pounds, peeled\n\tCarrots, about 1 pound, peeled\n\tOnion, 1 medium, sliced thin\n\tGreen Beans, 5 to 6 ounces, topped and tailed (trimmed), cut diagonally into 1-inch pieces\n\tCabbage, about 4 ounces, sliced thin\n\nPreheat oven to 400 degrees.\n\nPrepare 2 shallow baking pans or baking dishes that are the same size. Two jelly roll pans (11- x 15-inch) if you are feeding a family or 2 to 4 gratin dishes if you are cooking for one or two. Lightly coat the inside of each baking pan or dish with olive oil. Set aside.\n\nUse a sharp knife or a mandolin to slice Yukon Gold potatoes and carrots 1/8-inch thick, keeping them in separate piles.\n\nSalt and pepper the inside bottom of one pan. Arrange about half of the Yukon Gold potato slices, shingle style, in the prepared pan, covering the bottom completely. Make another layer with all of the carrots, arranging them the same way. Sprinkle the onion slices, green beans and cabbage over the potatoes. End the stack with a layer of the remaining Yukon Golds, arranging them shingle style. Push the mixture down with your hands to pack it in to the pan tightly.\n\nBrush olive oil over the top layer and sprinkle with salt and pepper.\n\nSet the other prepared pan upside down over the pan of vegetables. Wrap the pans up tight with heavy-duty aluminum foil to hold them securely together.\n\nBake in 400-degree preheated oven for 30 minutes. Carefully flip the pans over (be sure to use oven mitts) and bake for another 30 minutes.\n\nRemove from oven. Allow the baked stack to rest for 5 minutes, then very carefully remove aluminum foil.\n\nLift off the top baking pan. Lay a large cutting board over the top of the baked stack and flip the stack over onto the cutting board. Carefully remove the baking pan. Slice the hot stack into squares or rectangles and serve. Refrigerate leftovers to save for soup.\n\n\t2 tablespoons olive oil\n\t1 cup chopped onions\n\t2 teaspoons caraway seeds\n\t3 (approximately) cups vegetable broth\n\t1 cup dairy or non-dairy milk\n\tSalt and pepper, to taste\n\tMinced fresh parsley, for serving\n\nIn a large soup pot, heat the oil. Add the chopped onion and caraway seeds. Saute until onions just begin to turn golden brown. Add all of the leftover vegetables to the pot. Add enough broth to just cover the vegetables. Bring to a boil. Turn down heat, cover pot and simmer for about 20 minutes, or until potatoes are falling apart and cabbage and green beans are tender.\n\nAdd milk.\n\nPuree to desired consistency. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Sprinkle some fresh parsley on each serving. Makes about 6 servings, depending on how many vegetables you started with.\n\n \n\n ","sdoeden"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:capitolchat.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":4273,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"capitolchat.areavoices.com/94871","permalink":"http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/2014/07/22/minnesota-doctors-may-be-in-short-supply/","blogid":"171","blogdomain":"capitolchat.areavoices.com","hostname":"capitolchat.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Minnesota doctors may be in short supply","content":"By Don Davis\nPrimary care doctors soon may be in short supply, a Minnesota Hospital Association report showed on Monday.\n“Many of our hospitals, especially those in greater Minnesota, already have difficulty attracting physicians,” association President Lawrence J. Massa said. “I hope this new information will provide an impetus to policy makers to make the urgent decisions needed on both the state and federal levels to give our health professional students access to the clinical training and residency experience they need to become licensed to practice.”\nThe study written by Towers Watson, a professional services company, says the doctor shortage will appear in the next decade. It found that “the current pipeline of graduates barely appears adequate to replace retirements as they occur. That, coupled with projected increases in demand because of an aging population, will result in a significant talent gap for physicians.”\nThere could be a shortage of 850 primary care doctors by 2024, the study shows.\nThe study blames the shortage on a growing and aging population, along with fewer doctors graduating and increased retirements. Many fields are experiencing higher retirement numbers as baby boomers age.\nThe hospital study shows about 1,350 primary care doctors are expected to leave the profession in the next decade from the approximately 5,000 in Minnesota today. At the same time, 1,300 doctors are expected to begin practice. Combined with increased demand, that would leave an 850-doctor shortfall, the study shows.\n“Minnesota health care organizations will need to take action to ensure they have access to the talent needed to successfully deliver quality care,” said the study’s chief author, Rick Sherwood of Towers Watson.\nHospital association officials say they will ask federal and state lawmakers to make changes that would encourage more people to pursue physician degrees. Some laws discourage taking medical courses, while federal cuts are being discussed in the medical education field, the association reported.\nThe association suggests developing a statewide health-care task force to look into the doctor situation. It also seeks more state medical education funding.\nThe group also says tele-medicine should expand to use more technology to serve patients remotely.\n“Given the challenges of moving additional spending proposals through Congress, solutions at the federal level may continue to be elusive,” Massa said. “More action at the state level is critical.”\nThe study said the registered nurse supply should remain strong.","rawcontent":"By Don Davis\nPrimary care doctors soon may be in short supply, a Minnesota Hospital Association report showed on Monday.\nMany of our hospitals, especially those in greater Minnesota, already have difficulty attracting physicians, association President Lawrence J. Massa said. I hope this new information will provide an impetus to policy makers to make the urgent decisions needed on both the state and federal levels to give our health professional students access to the clinical training and residency experience they need to become licensed to practice.\nThe study written by Towers Watson, a professional services company, says the doctor shortage will appear in the next decade. It found that the current pipeline of graduates barely appears adequate to replace retirements as they occur. That, coupled with projected increases in demand because of an aging population, will result in a significant talent gap for physicians.\nThere could be a shortage of 850 primary care doctors by 2024, the study shows.\nThe study blames the shortage on a growing and aging population, along with fewer doctors graduating and increased retirements. Many fields are experiencing higher retirement numbers as baby boomers age.\nThe hospital study shows about 1,350 primary care doctors are expected to leave the profession in the next decade from the approximately 5,000 in Minnesota today. At the same time, 1,300 doctors are expected to begin practice. Combined with increased demand, that would leave an 850-doctor shortfall, the study shows.\nMinnesota health care organizations will need to take action to ensure they have access to the talent needed to successfully deliver quality care, said the studys chief author, Rick Sherwood of Towers Watson.\nHospital association officials say they will ask federal and state lawmakers to make changes that would encourage more people to pursue physician degrees. Some laws discourage taking medical courses, while federal cuts are being discussed in the medical education field, the association reported.\nThe association suggests developing a statewide health-care task force to look into the doctor situation. It also seeks more state medical education funding.\nThe group also says tele-medicine should expand to use more technology to serve patients remotely.\nGiven the challenges of moving additional spending proposals through Congress, solutions at the federal level may continue to be elusive, Massa said. More action at the state level is critical.\nThe study said the registered nurse supply should remain strong.","contentnoshortcodes":"By Don Davis\nPrimary care doctors soon may be in short supply, a Minnesota Hospital Association report showed on Monday.\nMany of our hospitals, especially those in greater Minnesota, already have difficulty attracting physicians, association President Lawrence J. Massa said. I hope this new information will provide an impetus to policy makers to make the urgent decisions needed on both the state and federal levels to give our health professional students access to the clinical training and residency experience they need to become licensed to practice.\nThe study written by Towers Watson, a professional services company, says the doctor shortage will appear in the next decade. It found that the current pipeline of graduates barely appears adequate to replace retirements as they occur. That, coupled with projected increases in demand because of an aging population, will result in a significant talent gap for physicians.\nThere could be a shortage of 850 primary care doctors by 2024, the study shows.\nThe study blames the shortage on a growing and aging population, along with fewer doctors graduating and increased retirements. Many fields are experiencing higher retirement numbers as baby boomers age.\nThe hospital study shows about 1,350 primary care doctors are expected to leave the profession in the next decade from the approximately 5,000 in Minnesota today. At the same time, 1,300 doctors are expected to begin practice. Combined with increased demand, that would leave an 850-doctor shortfall, the study shows.\nMinnesota health care organizations will need to take action to ensure they have access to the talent needed to successfully deliver quality care, said the studys chief author, Rick Sherwood of Towers Watson.\nHospital association officials say they will ask federal and state lawmakers to make changes that would encourage more people to pursue physician degrees. Some laws discourage taking medical courses, while federal cuts are being discussed in the medical education field, the association reported.\nThe association suggests developing a statewide health-care task force to look into the doctor situation. It also seeks more state medical education funding.\nThe group also says tele-medicine should expand to use more technology to serve patients remotely.\nGiven the challenges of moving additional spending proposals through Congress, solutions at the federal level may continue to be elusive, Massa said. More action at the state level is critical.\nThe study said the registered nurse supply should remain strong.","numcomments":0,"author":"Don Davis","author_s":"http://capitolchat.areavoices.com/author/capitolchat/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-22T21:48:49Z","displaydate":"2014-07-22 16:48:49","displaymodified":"2014-07-22 16:48:49","tags":["doctors","health","hospitals","lawrence massa","rick sherwood"],"categories":["Minnesota government","Other"],"spell":["Minnesota doctors may be in short supply","By Don Davis\nPrimary care doctors soon may be in short supply, a Minnesota Hospital Association report showed on Monday.\n“Many of our hospitals, especially those in greater Minnesota, already have difficulty attracting physicians,” association President Lawrence J. Massa said. “I hope this new information will provide an impetus to policy makers to make the urgent decisions needed on both the state and federal levels to give our health professional students access to the clinical training and residency experience they need to become licensed to practice.”\nThe study written by Towers Watson, a professional services company, says the doctor shortage will appear in the next decade. It found that “the current pipeline of graduates barely appears adequate to replace retirements as they occur. That, coupled with projected increases in demand because of an aging population, will result in a significant talent gap for physicians.”\nThere could be a shortage of 850 primary care doctors by 2024, the study shows.\nThe study blames the shortage on a growing and aging population, along with fewer doctors graduating and increased retirements. Many fields are experiencing higher retirement numbers as baby boomers age.\nThe hospital study shows about 1,350 primary care doctors are expected to leave the profession in the next decade from the approximately 5,000 in Minnesota today. At the same time, 1,300 doctors are expected to begin practice. Combined with increased demand, that would leave an 850-doctor shortfall, the study shows.\n“Minnesota health care organizations will need to take action to ensure they have access to the talent needed to successfully deliver quality care,” said the study’s chief author, Rick Sherwood of Towers Watson.\nHospital association officials say they will ask federal and state lawmakers to make changes that would encourage more people to pursue physician degrees. Some laws discourage taking medical courses, while federal cuts are being discussed in the medical education field, the association reported.\nThe association suggests developing a statewide health-care task force to look into the doctor situation. It also seeks more state medical education funding.\nThe group also says tele-medicine should expand to use more technology to serve patients remotely.\n“Given the challenges of moving additional spending proposals through Congress, solutions at the federal level may continue to be elusive,” Massa said. “More action at the state level is critical.”\nThe study said the registered nurse supply should remain strong.","Don Davis"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:forumcomm.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:community.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":216,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"community.areavoices.com/1146","permalink":"http://community.areavoices.com/2013/10/09/teachers-professors-make-use-of-areavoices-in-the-classroom/","blogid":"1820","blogdomain":"community.areavoices.com","hostname":"community.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Teachers, Professors make use of Areavoices in the classroom","content":"One of the trends that I'm loving here on Areavoices is our growth in classroom blogs. Having students publish their schoolwork (as part of their schoolwork) is gaining in momentum.\n\nI'm so glad teachers and professors are seeing the value in having students log into their own blog and publish their thoughts and projects.\n\nNot long ago, I told you how Dr. Julie Mach, an associate professor of chemistry at Concordia College in Moorhead is utilizing Areavoices in her Neurochemistry course. Students are required to post their reflections on topics in Neurochemistry in a way that the everyday reader could understand. (Thanks guys!)\n\nhttp://cobbersonthebrain.areavoices.com/\n\nIt's been fun to see the students weigh in and publish their own works.\n\nNow Carrie Anne Platt is utilizing the platform for her Gender and Media class at North Dakota State University. The students were required to set up blogs specifically addressing issues concerning media influence on teens and tweens and their work has been really interesting. Here are just three blogs that stand out:\n\nhttp://tweenswag.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://blurredreflections.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://teensandmediainfluence.areavoices.com/\n","rawcontent":"One of the trends that I'm loving here on Areavoices is our growth in classroom blogs. Having students publish their schoolwork (as part of their schoolwork) is gaining in momentum.\n\nI'm so glad teachers and professors are seeing the value in having students log into their own blog and publish their thoughts and projects.\n\nNot long ago, I told you how Dr. Julie Mach, an associate professor of chemistry at Concordia College in Moorhead is utilizing Areavoices in her Neurochemistry course. Students are required to post their reflections on topics in Neurochemistry in a way that the everyday reader could understand. (Thanks guys!)\n\nhttp://cobbersonthebrain.areavoices.com/\n\nIt's been fun to see the students weigh in and publish their own works.\n\nNow Carrie Anne Platt is utilizing the platform for her Gender and Media class at North Dakota State University. The students were required to set up blogs specifically addressing issues concerning media influence on teens and tweens and their work has been really interesting. Here are just three blogs that stand out:\n\nhttp://tweenswag.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://blurredreflections.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://teensandmediainfluence.areavoices.com/\n","contentnoshortcodes":"One of the trends that I'm loving here on Areavoices is our growth in classroom blogs. Having students publish their schoolwork (as part of their schoolwork) is gaining in momentum.\n\nI'm so glad teachers and professors are seeing the value in having students log into their own blog and publish their thoughts and projects.\n\nNot long ago, I told you how Dr. Julie Mach, an associate professor of chemistry at Concordia College in Moorhead is utilizing Areavoices in her Neurochemistry course. Students are required to post their reflections on topics in Neurochemistry in a way that the everyday reader could understand. (Thanks guys!)\n\nhttp://cobbersonthebrain.areavoices.com/\n\nIt's been fun to see the students weigh in and publish their own works.\n\nNow Carrie Anne Platt is utilizing the platform for her Gender and Media class at North Dakota State University. The students were required to set up blogs specifically addressing issues concerning media influence on teens and tweens and their work has been really interesting. Here are just three blogs that stand out:\n\nhttp://tweenswag.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://blurredreflections.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://teensandmediainfluence.areavoices.com/\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Tracy Briggs","author_s":"http://community.areavoices.com/author/tracybriggs/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-10-09T19:21:05Z","displaydate":"2013-10-09 14:21:05","displaymodified":"2013-10-09 14:21:05","tags":["classroom blogging"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Teachers, Professors make use of Areavoices in the classroom","One of the trends that I'm loving here on Areavoices is our growth in classroom blogs. Having students publish their schoolwork (as part of their schoolwork) is gaining in momentum.\n\nI'm so glad teachers and professors are seeing the value in having students log into their own blog and publish their thoughts and projects.\n\nNot long ago, I told you how Dr. Julie Mach, an associate professor of chemistry at Concordia College in Moorhead is utilizing Areavoices in her Neurochemistry course. Students are required to post their reflections on topics in Neurochemistry in a way that the everyday reader could understand. (Thanks guys!)\n\nhttp://cobbersonthebrain.areavoices.com/\n\nIt's been fun to see the students weigh in and publish their own works.\n\nNow Carrie Anne Platt is utilizing the platform for her Gender and Media class at North Dakota State University. The students were required to set up blogs specifically addressing issues concerning media influence on teens and tweens and their work has been really interesting. Here are just three blogs that stand out:\n\nhttp://tweenswag.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://blurredreflections.areavoices.com/\n\nhttp://teensandmediainfluence.areavoices.com/\n","Tracy Briggs"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:support.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":24,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"support.areavoices.com/304","permalink":"http://support.areavoices.com/2013/05/14/blog-tutorial-using-tags-to-organize-your-posts-and-help-your-readers-find-info/","blogid":"1290","blogdomain":"support.areavoices.com","hostname":"support.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Blog Tutorial: Using 'tags' to organize your posts and help your readers find info","content":" \n\n\n\n This is the third in a series of tutorials from The Forum's Community Content Coordinator Shane Mercer.\n \n\n\nUsing tag words on your blog posts is a quick and easy way to “group” your posts and create links to those groups of posts.\n\n“How?” you ask? I’ll use my own “Everything Else” blog as an example (that’s right … the one you’re looking at right now). Now, I love photography, and one of the things I do on my blog (besides create blog tutorials) is post photos that I’ve taken. Usually, when I post a photo/photos, I also like to include a link that says something like, “If you enjoyed these photos, feel free to check out more of my images here.” And if you click on the blue “check out more of my images here” part of that statement, it will take you to this URL:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics/, which is a list or “stream” of photo posts that I’ve created.\n\nPretty cool, I think. And it’s super easy to do. Each time I write a post about my photography, I add the term “shanepics” to that post in the “tags” box. To do this, just enter the tag word you want to use and click the “Add” button. You can attach as may tag words as you want to a blog post. (see the image below)\n\n\n\nSince my photo posts are all tagged with the “shanepics” tag, they’re all neatly organized into a “feed’ or “stream” or list at http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics. You can see that all my posts that are tagged “shanepics” are at this URL. All you need to do to make this link work for your own page is to replace “shane” with the name of your blog and replace “shanepics” with your own tag words.\n\nPretty cool, huh? That’s also the technique I used to create the “Shane’s pictures” link at the top of my blog (see the image below). If you want to know how to get a link like that in the menu at the top of your own blog, here’s a tutorial on “menus.”\n\n\n\nAnd that’s not all you can do with the tag stream function. You can also create tag streams that use more than one tag word. For example, Let’s say I wanted a stream of all the blog posts I’ve created related to my photography or the music beat that I used to cover. The following address will link to posts that are tagged either shanepics” or“music”: http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics,music/ (Note the comma in between the tag words).\n\nOr, suppose I want create a link that contains only blog posts that contain both black-and-white photos and landscape photos. I have a “bw” tag for my posts that contain the former and a “landscape” tag for my posts that contain the latter. I can include both of those words in the web address and insert a “+” sign between them (instead of a comma), and it will give me a “tag stream” that contains only posts that are tagged with both of those terms: http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/landscape+bw/.\n\nLet me know if you have questions. And, if you’re interested in seeing more blog how-to’s,here they are (and, yes, I created that with a tag stream too  ).\n\n","rawcontent":" \n\n\n\nThis is the third in a series of tutorials from The Forum's Community Content Coordinator Shane Mercer.\n \n\n\nUsing tag words on your blog posts is a quick and easy way to group your posts and create links to those groups of posts.\n\nHow? you ask? Ill use my own Everything Else blog as an example (thats right the one youre looking at right now). Now, I love photography, and one of the things I do on my blog (besides create blog tutorials) is post photos that Ive taken. Usually, when I post a photo/photos, I also like to include a link that says something like, If you enjoyed these photos, feel free tocheck out more of my images here. And if you click on the blue check out more of my images here part of that statement, it will take you to this URL:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics/,whichisa list or stream of photo posts that Ive created.\n\nPretty cool, I think. And its super easy to do. Each time I write a post about my photography, I add the term shanepics to that post in the tags box. To do this, just enter the tag word you want to use and click the Add button.You can attach as may tag words as you want to a blog post.(see the image below)\n\n\n\nSince my photo posts are all tagged with the shanepics tag, theyre all neatly organized into a feed or stream or list athttp://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics. You can see that all my posts that are tagged shanepics are at this URL. All you need to do to make this link work for your own page is to replace shane with the name of your blog and replace shanepics with your own tag words.\n\nPretty cool, huh? Thats also the technique I used to create the Shanes pictures link at the top of my blog (see the image below). If you want to know how to get a link like that in the menu at the top of your own blog, heresa tutorial on menus.\n\n\n\nAnd thats not all you can do with the tag stream function. You can also create tag streams that use more than one tag word. For example, Lets say I wanted a stream of all the blog posts Ive created related to my photography or the music beat that I used to cover. The following address will link to posts that are taggedeithershanepicsormusic:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics,music/(Note the comma in between the tag words).\n\nOr, suppose I want create a link that contains only blog posts that containbothblack-and-white photosandlandscape photos. I have a bw tag for my posts that contain the former and a landscape tag for my posts that contain the latter. I can include both of those words in the web address and insert a + sign between them (instead of a comma), and it will give mea tag stream that contains only posts that are tagged with both of those terms:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/landscape+bw/.\n\nLet me knowif you have questions. And, if youre interested in seeing more blog how-tos,here they are(and, yes, I created that with a tag stream too).\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":" \n\n\n\nThis is the third in a series of tutorials from The Forum's Community Content Coordinator Shane Mercer.\n \n\n\nUsing tag words on your blog posts is a quick and easy way to group your posts and create links to those groups of posts.\n\nHow? you ask? Ill use my own Everything Else blog as an example (thats right the one youre looking at right now). Now, I love photography, and one of the things I do on my blog (besides create blog tutorials) is post photos that Ive taken. Usually, when I post a photo/photos, I also like to include a link that says something like, If you enjoyed these photos, feel free tocheck out more of my images here. And if you click on the blue check out more of my images here part of that statement, it will take you to this URL:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics/,whichisa list or stream of photo posts that Ive created.\n\nPretty cool, I think. And its super easy to do. Each time I write a post about my photography, I add the term shanepics to that post in the tags box. To do this, just enter the tag word you want to use and click the Add button.You can attach as may tag words as you want to a blog post.(see the image below)\n\n\n\nSince my photo posts are all tagged with the shanepics tag, theyre all neatly organized into a feed or stream or list athttp://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics. You can see that all my posts that are tagged shanepics are at this URL. All you need to do to make this link work for your own page is to replace shane with the name of your blog and replace shanepics with your own tag words.\n\nPretty cool, huh? Thats also the technique I used to create the Shanes pictures link at the top of my blog (see the image below). If you want to know how to get a link like that in the menu at the top of your own blog, heresa tutorial on menus.\n\n\n\nAnd thats not all you can do with the tag stream function. You can also create tag streams that use more than one tag word. For example, Lets say I wanted a stream of all the blog posts Ive created related to my photography or the music beat that I used to cover. The following address will link to posts that are taggedeithershanepicsormusic:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics,music/(Note the comma in between the tag words).\n\nOr, suppose I want create a link that contains only blog posts that containbothblack-and-white photosandlandscape photos. I have a bw tag for my posts that contain the former and a landscape tag for my posts that contain the latter. I can include both of those words in the web address and insert a + sign between them (instead of a comma), and it will give mea tag stream that contains only posts that are tagged with both of those terms:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/landscape+bw/.\n\nLet me knowif you have questions. And, if youre interested in seeing more blog how-tos,here they are(and, yes, I created that with a tag stream too).\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Tracy Briggs","author_s":"http://support.areavoices.com/author/tracybriggs/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-05-14T21:39:48Z","displaydate":"2013-05-14 21:39:48","displaymodified":"2013-05-14 21:39:48","tags":["blog tags"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Blog Tutorial: Using 'tags' to organize your posts and help your readers find info"," \n\n\n\n This is the third in a series of tutorials from The Forum's Community Content Coordinator Shane Mercer.\n \n\n\nUsing tag words on your blog posts is a quick and easy way to “group” your posts and create links to those groups of posts.\n\n“How?” you ask? I’ll use my own “Everything Else” blog as an example (that’s right … the one you’re looking at right now). Now, I love photography, and one of the things I do on my blog (besides create blog tutorials) is post photos that I’ve taken. Usually, when I post a photo/photos, I also like to include a link that says something like, “If you enjoyed these photos, feel free to check out more of my images here.” And if you click on the blue “check out more of my images here” part of that statement, it will take you to this URL:http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics/, which is a list or “stream” of photo posts that I’ve created.\n\nPretty cool, I think. And it’s super easy to do. Each time I write a post about my photography, I add the term “shanepics” to that post in the “tags” box. To do this, just enter the tag word you want to use and click the “Add” button. You can attach as may tag words as you want to a blog post. (see the image below)\n\n\n\nSince my photo posts are all tagged with the “shanepics” tag, they’re all neatly organized into a “feed’ or “stream” or list at http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics. You can see that all my posts that are tagged “shanepics” are at this URL. All you need to do to make this link work for your own page is to replace “shane” with the name of your blog and replace “shanepics” with your own tag words.\n\nPretty cool, huh? That’s also the technique I used to create the “Shane’s pictures” link at the top of my blog (see the image below). If you want to know how to get a link like that in the menu at the top of your own blog, here’s a tutorial on “menus.”\n\n\n\nAnd that’s not all you can do with the tag stream function. You can also create tag streams that use more than one tag word. For example, Let’s say I wanted a stream of all the blog posts I’ve created related to my photography or the music beat that I used to cover. The following address will link to posts that are tagged either shanepics” or“music”: http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/shanepics,music/ (Note the comma in between the tag words).\n\nOr, suppose I want create a link that contains only blog posts that contain both black-and-white photos and landscape photos. I have a “bw” tag for my posts that contain the former and a “landscape” tag for my posts that contain the latter. I can include both of those words in the web address and insert a “+” sign between them (instead of a comma), and it will give me a “tag stream” that contains only posts that are tagged with both of those terms: http://shane.areavoices.com/tag/landscape+bw/.\n\nLet me know if you have questions. And, if you’re interested in seeing more blog how-to’s,here they are (and, yes, I created that with a tag stream too  ).\n\n","Tracy Briggs"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:healthbeat.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":789,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"healthbeat.areavoices.com/93092","permalink":"http://healthbeat.areavoices.com/2014/06/24/when-the-patient-becomes-the-doctors-caretaker/","blogid":"490","blogdomain":"healthbeat.areavoices.com","hostname":"healthbeat.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"When the patient becomes the doctor's caretaker","content":"In a video interview, the anonymous doctor's frustration comes through loud and clear. She takes care of complex patients with many health needs, often working 11 or 12 hours a day, sacrificing time with her family. Yet the message she constantly gets from administrators is that she's \"dumb and inefficient\" if she can't crank patients through the system every 15 minutes.\n\nIn a word, she's abused.\n\nAnd patients ought to care enough about their doctors to ask them if they're being abused, according to Dr. Pamela Wible, who raised the issue recently on her blog. \"The life you save may save you,\" wrote Dr. Wible, a primary care doctor on the West Coast who established her own version of the ideal medical practice after becoming burned-out by the corporate model of care.\n\nThis is one of those issues that's like lifting a corner of the forbidden curtain. Many patients probably don't think too much about their doctor's challenges and frustrations. After all, physicians are paid more than enough to compensate for any workplace frustration, aren't they? Isn't this what they signed up for?\n\nThe problem with this kind of thinking is that it ignores reality. Medicine, especially primary care, has become a difficult, high-pressure environment to be in. One study, for example, that tracked the daily routine at a private practice found the physicians saw an average of 18 patients a day, made 23.7 phone calls, received 16.8 emails, processed 12.1 prescription refills and reviewed 19.5 laboratory reports, 11.1 imaging reports and 13.9 consultation reports.\n\nAnd when physicians are overloaded, unhappy and feel taken advantage of, it tends to be only a matter of time before it spills over into how they interact with their patients.\n\nThe million-dollar question here is whether patients can - or should - do anything about it.\n\nDr. Wible advocates taking a \"just ask\" approach. Compassion and advocacy by patients for their doctors can accomplish far more than most people think, she says.\n\nOne of her blog readers agreed, saying the pressures \"must frustrate them beyond endurance. I'm going to start asking.\"\n\nAnother commenter sounded a note of caution, though: \"I feel there is a risk for a patient to ask such a question to a dr. who might be hiding how very fragile he/she is.\"\n\nMore doubts were voiced at Kevin MD, where Dr. Wible's blog entry was cross-posted this week. A sample:\n\n- \"Abused is a very emotionally loaded word that brings up powerful emotions and feelings like shame. I think if a doc is asked by a patient whether he/she is abused, they might actually end up feeling accused.\"\n\n-  \"I'm having a hard time imagining most docs responding well to their patients asking them if they are abused and I doubt that most docs would respond 'yes, I am being abused' to patients who do ask that no matter what was going on in their workplace. Nor do I think most patients want to spend a big chunk of their doctor visit talking about the doctor's problems and issues.\"\n\n- \"And what could I do if the answer is 'yes'?\"\n\nI'm not sure what to think. At its core, health care is a transaction between human beings that becomes most healing when all the parties are able to recognize each other's humanity.\n\nYet reams have been written about doctor-patient boundaries and the hazards of too much self-disclosure by the physician. Can it ultimately damage the relationship if the doctor shows vulnerability or emotional neediness? What are the ethics of a role reversal that puts the patient in the position of being caretaker to the doctor?\n\nWhat do readers think? I'd like to know.","rawcontent":"In a video interview, the anonymous doctor's frustration comes through loud and clear. She takes care of complex patients with many health needs, often working 11 or 12 hours a day, sacrificing time with her family. Yet the message she constantly gets from administrators is that she's \"dumb and inefficient\" if she can't crank patients through the system every 15 minutes.\n\nIn a word, she's abused.\n\nAnd patients ought to care enough about their doctors to ask them if they're being abused, according to Dr. Pamela Wible, who raised the issue recently on her blog. \"The life you save may save you,\" wrote Dr. Wible, a primary care doctor on the West Coast who established her own version of the ideal medical practice after becoming burned-out by the corporate model of care.\n\nThis is one of those issues that's like lifting a corner of the forbidden curtain. Many patients probably don't think too much about their doctor's challenges and frustrations. After all, physicians are paid more than enough to compensate for any workplace frustration, aren't they? Isn't this what they signed up for?\n\nThe problem with this kind of thinking is that it ignores reality. Medicine, especially primary care, has become a difficult, high-pressure environment to be in. One study, for example, that tracked the daily routine at a private practice found the physicians saw an average of 18 patients a day, made 23.7 phone calls, received 16.8 emails, processed 12.1 prescription refills and reviewed 19.5 laboratory reports, 11.1 imaging reports and 13.9 consultation reports.\n\nAnd when physicians are overloaded, unhappy and feel taken advantage of, it tends to be only a matter of time before it spills over into how they interact with their patients.\n\nThe million-dollar question here is whether patients can - or should - do anything about it.\n\nDr. Wible advocates taking a \"just ask\" approach. Compassion and advocacy by patients for their doctors can accomplish far more than most people think, she says.\n\nOne of her blog readers agreed, saying the pressures \"must frustrate them beyond endurance. I'm going to start asking.\"\n\nAnother commenter sounded a note of caution, though: \"I feel there is a risk for a patient to ask such a question to a dr. who might be hiding how very fragile he/she is.\"\n\nMore doubts were voiced at Kevin MD, where Dr. Wible's blog entry was cross-posted this week. A sample:\n\n- \"Abused is a very emotionally loaded word that brings up powerful emotions and feelings like shame. I think if a doc is asked by a patient whether he/she is abused, they might actually end up feeling accused.\"\n\n-\"I'm having a hard time imagining most docs responding well to their patients asking them if they are abused and I doubt that most docs would respond 'yes, I am being abused' to patients who do ask that no matter what was going on in their workplace. Nor do I think most patients want to spend a big chunk of their doctor visit talking about the doctor's problems and issues.\"\n\n- \"And what could I do if the answer is 'yes'?\"\n\nI'm not sure what to think. At its core, health care is a transaction between human beings that becomes most healing when all the parties are able to recognize each other's humanity.\n\nYet reams have been written about doctor-patient boundaries and the hazards of too much self-disclosure by the physician. Can it ultimately damage the relationship if the doctor shows vulnerability or emotional neediness? What are the ethics of a role reversal that puts the patient in the position of being caretaker to the doctor?\n\nWhat do readers think? I'd like to know.","contentnoshortcodes":"In a video interview, the anonymous doctor's frustration comes through loud and clear. She takes care of complex patients with many health needs, often working 11 or 12 hours a day, sacrificing time with her family. Yet the message she constantly gets from administrators is that she's \"dumb and inefficient\" if she can't crank patients through the system every 15 minutes.\n\nIn a word, she's abused.\n\nAnd patients ought to care enough about their doctors to ask them if they're being abused, according to Dr. Pamela Wible, who raised the issue recently on her blog. \"The life you save may save you,\" wrote Dr. Wible, a primary care doctor on the West Coast who established her own version of the ideal medical practice after becoming burned-out by the corporate model of care.\n\nThis is one of those issues that's like lifting a corner of the forbidden curtain. Many patients probably don't think too much about their doctor's challenges and frustrations. After all, physicians are paid more than enough to compensate for any workplace frustration, aren't they? Isn't this what they signed up for?\n\nThe problem with this kind of thinking is that it ignores reality. Medicine, especially primary care, has become a difficult, high-pressure environment to be in. One study, for example, that tracked the daily routine at a private practice found the physicians saw an average of 18 patients a day, made 23.7 phone calls, received 16.8 emails, processed 12.1 prescription refills and reviewed 19.5 laboratory reports, 11.1 imaging reports and 13.9 consultation reports.\n\nAnd when physicians are overloaded, unhappy and feel taken advantage of, it tends to be only a matter of time before it spills over into how they interact with their patients.\n\nThe million-dollar question here is whether patients can - or should - do anything about it.\n\nDr. Wible advocates taking a \"just ask\" approach. Compassion and advocacy by patients for their doctors can accomplish far more than most people think, she says.\n\nOne of her blog readers agreed, saying the pressures \"must frustrate them beyond endurance. I'm going to start asking.\"\n\nAnother commenter sounded a note of caution, though: \"I feel there is a risk for a patient to ask such a question to a dr. who might be hiding how very fragile he/she is.\"\n\nMore doubts were voiced at Kevin MD, where Dr. Wible's blog entry was cross-posted this week. A sample:\n\n- \"Abused is a very emotionally loaded word that brings up powerful emotions and feelings like shame. I think if a doc is asked by a patient whether he/she is abused, they might actually end up feeling accused.\"\n\n-\"I'm having a hard time imagining most docs responding well to their patients asking them if they are abused and I doubt that most docs would respond 'yes, I am being abused' to patients who do ask that no matter what was going on in their workplace. Nor do I think most patients want to spend a big chunk of their doctor visit talking about the doctor's problems and issues.\"\n\n- \"And what could I do if the answer is 'yes'?\"\n\nI'm not sure what to think. At its core, health care is a transaction between human beings that becomes most healing when all the parties are able to recognize each other's humanity.\n\nYet reams have been written about doctor-patient boundaries and the hazards of too much self-disclosure by the physician. Can it ultimately damage the relationship if the doctor shows vulnerability or emotional neediness? What are the ethics of a role reversal that puts the patient in the position of being caretaker to the doctor?\n\nWhat do readers think? I'd like to know.","numcomments":0,"author":"Anne Polta","author_s":"http://healthbeat.areavoices.com/author/apolta/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-06-24T17:55:40Z","displaydate":"2014-06-24 12:55:40","displaymodified":"2014-06-24 12:58:10","tags":["health","mental health"],"categories":["doctor-patient relationship","ethics"],"spell":["When the patient becomes the doctor's caretaker","In a video interview, the anonymous doctor's frustration comes through loud and clear. She takes care of complex patients with many health needs, often working 11 or 12 hours a day, sacrificing time with her family. Yet the message she constantly gets from administrators is that she's \"dumb and inefficient\" if she can't crank patients through the system every 15 minutes.\n\nIn a word, she's abused.\n\nAnd patients ought to care enough about their doctors to ask them if they're being abused, according to Dr. Pamela Wible, who raised the issue recently on her blog. \"The life you save may save you,\" wrote Dr. Wible, a primary care doctor on the West Coast who established her own version of the ideal medical practice after becoming burned-out by the corporate model of care.\n\nThis is one of those issues that's like lifting a corner of the forbidden curtain. Many patients probably don't think too much about their doctor's challenges and frustrations. After all, physicians are paid more than enough to compensate for any workplace frustration, aren't they? Isn't this what they signed up for?\n\nThe problem with this kind of thinking is that it ignores reality. Medicine, especially primary care, has become a difficult, high-pressure environment to be in. One study, for example, that tracked the daily routine at a private practice found the physicians saw an average of 18 patients a day, made 23.7 phone calls, received 16.8 emails, processed 12.1 prescription refills and reviewed 19.5 laboratory reports, 11.1 imaging reports and 13.9 consultation reports.\n\nAnd when physicians are overloaded, unhappy and feel taken advantage of, it tends to be only a matter of time before it spills over into how they interact with their patients.\n\nThe million-dollar question here is whether patients can - or should - do anything about it.\n\nDr. Wible advocates taking a \"just ask\" approach. Compassion and advocacy by patients for their doctors can accomplish far more than most people think, she says.\n\nOne of her blog readers agreed, saying the pressures \"must frustrate them beyond endurance. I'm going to start asking.\"\n\nAnother commenter sounded a note of caution, though: \"I feel there is a risk for a patient to ask such a question to a dr. who might be hiding how very fragile he/she is.\"\n\nMore doubts were voiced at Kevin MD, where Dr. Wible's blog entry was cross-posted this week. A sample:\n\n- \"Abused is a very emotionally loaded word that brings up powerful emotions and feelings like shame. I think if a doc is asked by a patient whether he/she is abused, they might actually end up feeling accused.\"\n\n-  \"I'm having a hard time imagining most docs responding well to their patients asking them if they are abused and I doubt that most docs would respond 'yes, I am being abused' to patients who do ask that no matter what was going on in their workplace. Nor do I think most patients want to spend a big chunk of their doctor visit talking about the doctor's problems and issues.\"\n\n- \"And what could I do if the answer is 'yes'?\"\n\nI'm not sure what to think. At its core, health care is a transaction between human beings that becomes most healing when all the parties are able to recognize each other's humanity.\n\nYet reams have been written about doctor-patient boundaries and the hazards of too much self-disclosure by the physician. Can it ultimately damage the relationship if the doctor shows vulnerability or emotional neediness? What are the ethics of a role reversal that puts the patient in the position of being caretaker to the doctor?\n\nWhat do readers think? I'd like to know.","Anne Polta"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:centralwestflood.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:westcentraltribune.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":4,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"westcentraltribune.areavoices.com/127","permalink":"http://westcentraltribune.areavoices.com/2013/05/29/come-play-frisbee-for-a-good-cause/","blogid":"18682","blogdomain":"westcentraltribune.areavoices.com","hostname":"westcentraltribune.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Come play frisbee for a good cause!","content":"The second annual NIE Disc Golf Tournament will take place June 15 at Robbins Island in Willmar.\n\nThe 18-hole tournament will be singles competition, with a maximum of 75 players. Anyone can play in the tournament, regardless of skill level.\n\nAll participants will receive a T-shirt, pizza and water. There will also be door prizes, and the top three advanced finishers will receive cash prizes.\n\nThe major sponsor of the tournament is the West Central Tribune. Registration is $20 for advanced players and $10 for beginners. Proceeds from the event will go toward Newspapers in Education, which provides the Tribune to schools in west central Minnesota.\n\nFor more information or to register for the tournament, contact the Tribune at 320-235-1154 or email wctcirc@wctrib.com.","rawcontent":"The second annual NIE Disc Golf Tournament will take place June 15 at Robbins Island in Willmar.\n\nThe 18-hole tournament will be singles competition, with a maximum of 75 players. Anyone can play in the tournament, regardless of skill level.\n\nAll participants will receive a T-shirt, pizza and water. There will also be door prizes, and the top three advanced finishers will receive cash prizes.\n\nThe major sponsor of the tournament is the West Central Tribune. Registration is $20 for advanced players and $10 for beginners. Proceeds from the event will go toward Newspapers in Education, which provides the Tribune to schools in west central Minnesota.\n\nFor more information or to register for the tournament, contact the Tribune at 320-235-1154 or email wctcirc@wctrib.com.","contentnoshortcodes":"The second annual NIE Disc Golf Tournament will take place June 15 at Robbins Island in Willmar.\n\nThe 18-hole tournament will be singles competition, with a maximum of 75 players. Anyone can play in the tournament, regardless of skill level.\n\nAll participants will receive a T-shirt, pizza and water. There will also be door prizes, and the top three advanced finishers will receive cash prizes.\n\nThe major sponsor of the tournament is the West Central Tribune. Registration is $20 for advanced players and $10 for beginners. Proceeds from the event will go toward Newspapers in Education, which provides the Tribune to schools in west central Minnesota.\n\nFor more information or to register for the tournament, contact the Tribune at 320-235-1154 or email wctcirc@wctrib.com.","numcomments":0,"author":"Ashley White","author_s":"http://westcentraltribune.areavoices.com/author/ashleymwhite/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-05-29T20:30:41Z","displaydate":"2013-05-29 15:30:41","displaymodified":"2013-05-29 15:30:41","tags":["Disc Golf Tournament","Newspapers in Education","NIE","Robbins Island","West Central Tribune","Willmar"],"categories":["West Central Tribune"],"spell":["Come play frisbee for a good cause!","The second annual NIE Disc Golf Tournament will take place June 15 at Robbins Island in Willmar.\n\nThe 18-hole tournament will be singles competition, with a maximum of 75 players. Anyone can play in the tournament, regardless of skill level.\n\nAll participants will receive a T-shirt, pizza and water. There will also be door prizes, and the top three advanced finishers will receive cash prizes.\n\nThe major sponsor of the tournament is the West Central Tribune. Registration is $20 for advanced players and $10 for beginners. Proceeds from the event will go toward Newspapers in Education, which provides the Tribune to schools in west central Minnesota.\n\nFor more information or to register for the tournament, contact the Tribune at 320-235-1154 or email wctcirc@wctrib.com.","Ashley White"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:insidescoop.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":58,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"insidescoop.areavoices.com/1214","permalink":"http://insidescoop.areavoices.com/2014/05/29/west-central-tribunes-picture-man-retires-this-week/","blogid":"23087","blogdomain":"insidescoop.areavoices.com","hostname":"insidescoop.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"West Central Tribune's 'picture man' retires this week","content":"[caption id=\"attachment_1216\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Ron Adams photographed three-sport athlete Tara Rudie, one of Willmar High School's senior academic leaders, at Hodapp Field on May 15. Tribune photo by Rand Middleton[/caption]\n\nBy Anne Polta\n\napolta@wctrib.com\n\nWILLMAR — His work as one of the West Central Tribune’s news photographers made Ron Adams a familiar sight at local parades, school events and more.\n\nHis pictures — and, more recently, videos — appeared almost daily in the newspaper’s print edition and online.\n\nThis week Adams, 61, is trading in his camera for retirement and a full-time career as a painter.\n\nHis last day is Saturday. A farewell open house will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Willmar Public Library.\n\nAdams said he will miss his role as a window between readers and the community. “When you’re a photographer for a newspaper, you’re the face of the community,” he said.\n\nHe will also miss his co-workers in the newsroom.\n\n“All of the reporters are like my best friends because I see them more than I see anybody else,” he said. “That’s going to be the hardest thing about leaving the fold. It is just like a family.”\n\n“It has been my privilege to work with Ron with more than 12 years,” said Editor Kelly Boldan. “He has worked with dedication and consistency. His photography has played a major role in recording history in Willmar and the region for nearly two decades. He has left his mark.”\n\nAdams has been with the Tribune for just a few months short of 20 years.\nArt is his first love, going all the way back to high school when he began painting, but he learned early to appreciate the imagery of photography.\n\nFrom small canvases to large murals, his paintings have always used photographs as the starting point. Wanting to use his own photos instead of someone else’s, he decided to pick up a camera and learn how to use it well. “It’s very important to have good images to work from,” he said.\n\nHe started working at the Tribune in 1994 as a part-time photographer. His tall, lanky figure soon became a fixture at local news events, especially on weekends. Schoolchildren referred to him as “the picture man.”\n\n“A lot of people know me on sight,” he said.\n\nKids and animals were two of his favorite photography subjects. One assignment that stands out in his memory was when a moose wandered into town and he was sent to take pictures. He also remembers being there to capture the moment when a pair of circus elephants at the fairgrounds was taken into Foot Lake for a dip.\n“What stands out in my mind is when something really different occurs, like a swimming elephant,” he said.\n\nMore recently he branched out into video, earning a statewide third-place award from the Minnesota Newspaper Association last year for his video of a reconciliation ceremony on the 150th anniversary of the U.S.-Dakota War.\nIn between photo assignments that often took him on the road to area communities,\n\nAdams is diligent about walking his dachshund, Jimi, and continuing with his painting. His latest one-man show, an exhibit at North American State Bank, is open through Saturday.\nAdams said he’s looking forward to concentrating full time on his art and becoming more active in the local arts community, especially now that he will no longer have to juggle studio time with a news photographer’s schedule.\n\nHe already has his first major retirement project lined up: a historic mural he has been commissioned to paint at the Kandiyohi County Health and Human Services Building. The project is being funded through a grant from the Southwest Minnesota Arts and Humanities Council and will probably take a year to complete.\n“This has been a dream of mine for 20 years now,” he said.","rawcontent":"[caption id=\"attachment_1216\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Ron Adams photographed three-sport athlete Tara Rudie, one of Willmar High School's senior academic leaders, at Hodapp Field on May 15. Tribune photo by Rand Middleton[/caption]\n\nBy Anne Polta\n\napolta@wctrib.com\n\nWILLMAR His work as one of the West Central Tribunes news photographers made Ron Adams a familiar sight at local parades, school events and more.\n\nHis pictures and, more recently, videos appeared almost daily in the newspapers print edition and online.\n\nThis week Adams, 61, is trading in his camera for retirement and a full-time career as a painter.\n\nHis last day is Saturday. A farewell open house will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Willmar Public Library.\n\nAdams said he will miss his role as a window between readers and the community. When youre a photographer for a newspaper, youre the face of the community, he said.\n\nHe will also miss his co-workers in the newsroom.\n\nAll of the reporters are like my best friends because I see them more than I see anybody else, he said. Thats going to be the hardest thing about leaving the fold. It is just like a family.\n\nIt has been my privilege to work with Ron with more than 12 years, said Editor Kelly Boldan. He has worked with dedication and consistency. His photography has played a major role in recording history in Willmar and the region for nearly two decades. He has left his mark.\n\nAdams has been with the Tribune for just a few months short of 20 years.\nArt is his first love, going all the way back to high school when he began painting, but he learned early to appreciate the imagery of photography.\n\nFrom small canvases to large murals, his paintings have always used photographs as the starting point. Wanting to use his own photos instead of someone elses, he decided to pick up a camera and learn how to use it well. Its very important to have good images to work from, he said.\n\nHe started working at the Tribune in 1994 as a part-time photographer. His tall, lanky figure soon became a fixture at local news events, especially on weekends. Schoolchildren referred to him as the picture man.\n\nA lot of people know me on sight, he said.\n\nKids and animals were two of his favorite photography subjects. One assignment that stands out in his memory was when a moose wandered into town and he was sent to take pictures. He also remembers being there to capture the moment when a pair of circus elephants at the fairgrounds was taken into Foot Lake for a dip.\nWhat stands out in my mind is when something really different occurs, like a swimming elephant, he said.\n\nMore recently he branched out into video, earning a statewide third-place award from the Minnesota Newspaper Association last year for his video of a reconciliation ceremony on the 150th anniversary of the U.S.-Dakota War.\nIn between photo assignments that often took him on the road to area communities,\n\nAdams is diligent about walking his dachshund, Jimi, and continuing with his painting. His latest one-man show, an exhibit at North American State Bank, is open through Saturday.\nAdams said hes looking forward to concentrating full time on his art and becoming more active in the local arts community, especially now that he will no longer have to juggle studio time with a news photographers schedule.\n\nHe already has his first major retirement project lined up: a historic mural he has been commissioned to paint at the Kandiyohi County Health and Human Services Building. The project is being funded through a grant from the Southwest Minnesota Arts and Humanities Council and will probably take a year to complete.\nThis has been a dream of mine for 20 years now, he said.","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\nBy Anne Polta\n\napolta@wctrib.com\n\nWILLMAR His work as one of the West Central Tribunes news photographers made Ron Adams a familiar sight at local parades, school events and more.\n\nHis pictures and, more recently, videos appeared almost daily in the newspapers print edition and online.\n\nThis week Adams, 61, is trading in his camera for retirement and a full-time career as a painter.\n\nHis last day is Saturday. A farewell open house will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Willmar Public Library.\n\nAdams said he will miss his role as a window between readers and the community. When youre a photographer for a newspaper, youre the face of the community, he said.\n\nHe will also miss his co-workers in the newsroom.\n\nAll of the reporters are like my best friends because I see them more than I see anybody else, he said. Thats going to be the hardest thing about leaving the fold. It is just like a family.\n\nIt has been my privilege to work with Ron with more than 12 years, said Editor Kelly Boldan. He has worked with dedication and consistency. His photography has played a major role in recording history in Willmar and the region for nearly two decades. He has left his mark.\n\nAdams has been with the Tribune for just a few months short of 20 years.\nArt is his first love, going all the way back to high school when he began painting, but he learned early to appreciate the imagery of photography.\n\nFrom small canvases to large murals, his paintings have always used photographs as the starting point. Wanting to use his own photos instead of someone elses, he decided to pick up a camera and learn how to use it well. Its very important to have good images to work from, he said.\n\nHe started working at the Tribune in 1994 as a part-time photographer. His tall, lanky figure soon became a fixture at local news events, especially on weekends. Schoolchildren referred to him as the picture man.\n\nA lot of people know me on sight, he said.\n\nKids and animals were two of his favorite photography subjects. One assignment that stands out in his memory was when a moose wandered into town and he was sent to take pictures. He also remembers being there to capture the moment when a pair of circus elephants at the fairgrounds was taken into Foot Lake for a dip.\nWhat stands out in my mind is when something really different occurs, like a swimming elephant, he said.\n\nMore recently he branched out into video, earning a statewide third-place award from the Minnesota Newspaper Association last year for his video of a reconciliation ceremony on the 150th anniversary of the U.S.-Dakota War.\nIn between photo assignments that often took him on the road to area communities,\n\nAdams is diligent about walking his dachshund, Jimi, and continuing with his painting. His latest one-man show, an exhibit at North American State Bank, is open through Saturday.\nAdams said hes looking forward to concentrating full time on his art and becoming more active in the local arts community, especially now that he will no longer have to juggle studio time with a news photographers schedule.\n\nHe already has his first major retirement project lined up: a historic mural he has been commissioned to paint at the Kandiyohi County Health and Human Services Building. The project is being funded through a grant from the Southwest Minnesota Arts and Humanities Council and will probably take a year to complete.\nThis has been a dream of mine for 20 years now, he said.","numcomments":0,"author":"Kelly Boldan","author_s":"http://insidescoop.areavoices.com/author/kboldan/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-05-29T05:19:13Z","displaydate":"2014-05-29 00:19:13","displaymodified":"2014-05-29 09:59:52","tags":["Photography","Ron Adams","West Central Tribune"],"categories":["news"],"spell":["West Central Tribune's 'picture man' retires this week","[caption id=\"attachment_1216\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Ron Adams photographed three-sport athlete Tara Rudie, one of Willmar High School's senior academic leaders, at Hodapp Field on May 15. Tribune photo by Rand Middleton[/caption]\n\nBy Anne Polta\n\napolta@wctrib.com\n\nWILLMAR — His work as one of the West Central Tribune’s news photographers made Ron Adams a familiar sight at local parades, school events and more.\n\nHis pictures — and, more recently, videos — appeared almost daily in the newspaper’s print edition and online.\n\nThis week Adams, 61, is trading in his camera for retirement and a full-time career as a painter.\n\nHis last day is Saturday. A farewell open house will be held from 1 to 3 p.m. Thursday at the Willmar Public Library.\n\nAdams said he will miss his role as a window between readers and the community. “When you’re a photographer for a newspaper, you’re the face of the community,” he said.\n\nHe will also miss his co-workers in the newsroom.\n\n“All of the reporters are like my best friends because I see them more than I see anybody else,” he said. “That’s going to be the hardest thing about leaving the fold. It is just like a family.”\n\n“It has been my privilege to work with Ron with more than 12 years,” said Editor Kelly Boldan. “He has worked with dedication and consistency. His photography has played a major role in recording history in Willmar and the region for nearly two decades. He has left his mark.”\n\nAdams has been with the Tribune for just a few months short of 20 years.\nArt is his first love, going all the way back to high school when he began painting, but he learned early to appreciate the imagery of photography.\n\nFrom small canvases to large murals, his paintings have always used photographs as the starting point. Wanting to use his own photos instead of someone else’s, he decided to pick up a camera and learn how to use it well. “It’s very important to have good images to work from,” he said.\n\nHe started working at the Tribune in 1994 as a part-time photographer. His tall, lanky figure soon became a fixture at local news events, especially on weekends. Schoolchildren referred to him as “the picture man.”\n\n“A lot of people know me on sight,” he said.\n\nKids and animals were two of his favorite photography subjects. One assignment that stands out in his memory was when a moose wandered into town and he was sent to take pictures. He also remembers being there to capture the moment when a pair of circus elephants at the fairgrounds was taken into Foot Lake for a dip.\n“What stands out in my mind is when something really different occurs, like a swimming elephant,” he said.\n\nMore recently he branched out into video, earning a statewide third-place award from the Minnesota Newspaper Association last year for his video of a reconciliation ceremony on the 150th anniversary of the U.S.-Dakota War.\nIn between photo assignments that often took him on the road to area communities,\n\nAdams is diligent about walking his dachshund, Jimi, and continuing with his painting. His latest one-man show, an exhibit at North American State Bank, is open through Saturday.\nAdams said he’s looking forward to concentrating full time on his art and becoming more active in the local arts community, especially now that he will no longer have to juggle studio time with a news photographer’s schedule.\n\nHe already has his first major retirement project lined up: a historic mural he has been commissioned to paint at the Kandiyohi County Health and Human Services Building. The project is being funded through a grant from the Southwest Minnesota Arts and Humanities Council and will probably take a year to complete.\n“This has been a dream of mine for 20 years now,” he said.","Kelly Boldan"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:2wheeler.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":91,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"2wheeler.areavoices.com/637","permalink":"http://2wheeler.areavoices.com/2014/06/23/pedal-for-project-impact-day-7-2/","blogid":"26140","blogdomain":"2wheeler.areavoices.com","hostname":"2wheeler.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Pedal for Project Impact, Day 7","content":"It was raining lightly as we loaded our luggage on Tom’s van for the final time Sunday morning.\nThen, as we rolled our bikes out of rooms, had breakfast and turned in our room keys, the rain stopped.\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_638\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] It was raining in Albany as we prepared for the last ride of Pedal for Project Impact 2014.[/caption]\nDaven took off. No sense in holding back the racer.\nBut there were dark clouds above as the rest of us pedaled out of Albany,\nWe spread out over a few miles on Stearns County Road 10 heading to Roscoe on the first phase of the ride to Willmar.\nCounty 10 from Albany to Roscoe is a rolling stretch of shoulderless road that I remembered from the same ride last year as being about 10 miles long.\nI was in good spirits as I completed my first eight miles on County 10 and was rolling down a long hill toward an intersection.\nI figured I had two miles left to Roscoe.\nThe sign at the intersection indicated I had six miles left to ride to Roscoe.\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_639\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] Stearns County Road 10 from Albany to Roscoe is 14 miles long, hilly and shoulderless.[/caption]\nRiding to Roscoe on County 10 offers a special reward: after 14 miles of climbing hills and looking out for vehicles, there’s one more steep hill to climb up to Highway 23.\nThere were few hills on the rest of the ride ro Willmar.\nBob caught up with me on the road to Paynesville and we stopped there at a gas station for coffee.\nAs we rode up the bridge over the Highway 23 bypass, we saw a cyclist at the top.\nIt was Jarrett Hubbard waiting for us.\nHe had planned to ride with us for the weekend, but couldn’t for a variety of reasons.\nThe three of us proceeded to the Glacial Lakes State Trail and met Tom a few miles later.\nHe drove to Willmar and pedaled back up the trail to join us.\nWe pedaled past New London and Spicer.\nAs we approached the trailhead in Willmar, we saw two women in the parking lot.\nSofia, my wife, and Aggie, Tom’s wife, were waiting for us.\nThere was hugging and photo taking and Pedal for Project Impact 2014 was over.\nThis year’s ride may be over, but you can still contribute to the cause.\nYou can mail a donation to: Safe Avenues, PO Box 568, Willmar, MN 56201. Please write PPI on the memo line of your check.\nDonations can also be done online at www.willmarshelter.com. Just click on the donate button at the top of the home page and follow the instructions.\n\n","rawcontent":"It was raining lightly as we loaded our luggage on Toms van for the final time Sunday morning.\nThen, as we rolled our bikes out of rooms, had breakfast and turned in our room keys, the rain stopped.\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_638\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] It was raining in Albany as we prepared for the last ride of Pedal for Project Impact 2014.[/caption]\nDaven took off. No sense in holding back the racer.\nBut there were dark clouds above as the rest of us pedaled out of Albany,\nWe spread out over a few miles on Stearns County Road 10 heading to Roscoe on the first phase of the ride to Willmar.\nCounty 10 from Albany to Roscoe is a rolling stretch of shoulderless road that I remembered from the same ride last year as being about 10 miles long.\nI was in good spirits as I completed my first eight miles on County 10 and was rolling down a long hill toward an intersection.\nI figured I had two miles left to Roscoe.\nThe sign at the intersection indicated I had six miles left to ride to Roscoe.\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_639\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] Stearns County Road 10 from Albany to Roscoe is 14 miles long, hilly and shoulderless.[/caption]\nRiding to Roscoe on County 10 offers a special reward: after 14 miles of climbing hills and looking out for vehicles, theres one more steep hill to climb up to Highway 23.\nThere were few hills on the rest of the ride ro Willmar.\nBob caught up with me on the road to Paynesville and we stopped there at a gas station for coffee.\nAs we rode up the bridge over the Highway 23 bypass, we saw a cyclist at the top.\nIt was Jarrett Hubbard waiting for us.\nHe had planned to ride with us for the weekend, but couldnt for a variety of reasons.\nThe three of us proceeded to the Glacial Lakes State Trail and met Tom a few miles later.\nHe drove to Willmar and pedaled back up the trail to join us.\nWe pedaled past New London and Spicer.\nAs we approached the trailhead in Willmar, we saw two women in the parking lot.\nSofia, my wife, and Aggie, Toms wife, were waiting for us.\nThere was hugging and photo taking and Pedal for Project Impact 2014 was over.\nThis years ride may be over, but you can still contribute to the cause.\nYou can mail a donation to: Safe Avenues, PO Box 568, Willmar, MN 56201. Please write PPI on the memo line of your check.\nDonations can also be done online at www.willmarshelter.com. Just click on the donate button at the top of the home page and follow the instructions.\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"It was raining lightly as we loaded our luggage on Toms van for the final time Sunday morning.\nThen, as we rolled our bikes out of rooms, had breakfast and turned in our room keys, the rain stopped.\n\n\n\nDaven took off. No sense in holding back the racer.\nBut there were dark clouds above as the rest of us pedaled out of Albany,\nWe spread out over a few miles on Stearns County Road 10 heading to Roscoe on the first phase of the ride to Willmar.\nCounty 10 from Albany to Roscoe is a rolling stretch of shoulderless road that I remembered from the same ride last year as being about 10 miles long.\nI was in good spirits as I completed my first eight miles on County 10 and was rolling down a long hill toward an intersection.\nI figured I had two miles left to Roscoe.\nThe sign at the intersection indicated I had six miles left to ride to Roscoe.\n\n\n\nRiding to Roscoe on County 10 offers a special reward: after 14 miles of climbing hills and looking out for vehicles, theres one more steep hill to climb up to Highway 23.\nThere were few hills on the rest of the ride ro Willmar.\nBob caught up with me on the road to Paynesville and we stopped there at a gas station for coffee.\nAs we rode up the bridge over the Highway 23 bypass, we saw a cyclist at the top.\nIt was Jarrett Hubbard waiting for us.\nHe had planned to ride with us for the weekend, but couldnt for a variety of reasons.\nThe three of us proceeded to the Glacial Lakes State Trail and met Tom a few miles later.\nHe drove to Willmar and pedaled back up the trail to join us.\nWe pedaled past New London and Spicer.\nAs we approached the trailhead in Willmar, we saw two women in the parking lot.\nSofia, my wife, and Aggie, Toms wife, were waiting for us.\nThere was hugging and photo taking and Pedal for Project Impact 2014 was over.\nThis years ride may be over, but you can still contribute to the cause.\nYou can mail a donation to: Safe Avenues, PO Box 568, Willmar, MN 56201. Please write PPI on the memo line of your check.\nDonations can also be done online at www.willmarshelter.com. Just click on the donate button at the top of the home page and follow the instructions.\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Gary Miller","author_s":"http://2wheeler.areavoices.com/author/garymiller/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-06-23T01:58:32Z","displaydate":"2014-06-23 01:58:32","displaymodified":"2014-06-23 01:58:32","tags":["albany","pedal for project impact","Willmar"],"categories":["Bicycle"],"spell":["Pedal for Project Impact, Day 7","It was raining lightly as we loaded our luggage on Tom’s van for the final time Sunday morning.\nThen, as we rolled our bikes out of rooms, had breakfast and turned in our room keys, the rain stopped.\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_638\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] It was raining in Albany as we prepared for the last ride of Pedal for Project Impact 2014.[/caption]\nDaven took off. No sense in holding back the racer.\nBut there were dark clouds above as the rest of us pedaled out of Albany,\nWe spread out over a few miles on Stearns County Road 10 heading to Roscoe on the first phase of the ride to Willmar.\nCounty 10 from Albany to Roscoe is a rolling stretch of shoulderless road that I remembered from the same ride last year as being about 10 miles long.\nI was in good spirits as I completed my first eight miles on County 10 and was rolling down a long hill toward an intersection.\nI figured I had two miles left to Roscoe.\nThe sign at the intersection indicated I had six miles left to ride to Roscoe.\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_639\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] Stearns County Road 10 from Albany to Roscoe is 14 miles long, hilly and shoulderless.[/caption]\nRiding to Roscoe on County 10 offers a special reward: after 14 miles of climbing hills and looking out for vehicles, there’s one more steep hill to climb up to Highway 23.\nThere were few hills on the rest of the ride ro Willmar.\nBob caught up with me on the road to Paynesville and we stopped there at a gas station for coffee.\nAs we rode up the bridge over the Highway 23 bypass, we saw a cyclist at the top.\nIt was Jarrett Hubbard waiting for us.\nHe had planned to ride with us for the weekend, but couldn’t for a variety of reasons.\nThe three of us proceeded to the Glacial Lakes State Trail and met Tom a few miles later.\nHe drove to Willmar and pedaled back up the trail to join us.\nWe pedaled past New London and Spicer.\nAs we approached the trailhead in Willmar, we saw two women in the parking lot.\nSofia, my wife, and Aggie, Tom’s wife, were waiting for us.\nThere was hugging and photo taking and Pedal for Project Impact 2014 was over.\nThis year’s ride may be over, but you can still contribute to the cause.\nYou can mail a donation to: Safe Avenues, PO Box 568, Willmar, MN 56201. Please write PPI on the memo line of your check.\nDonations can also be done online at www.willmarshelter.com. Just click on the donate button at the top of the home page and follow the instructions.\n\n","Gary Miller"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:cutencomfy.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:liveit.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:astroBob.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:fatgirl.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":317,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"fatgirl.areavoices.com/85577","permalink":"http://fatgirl.areavoices.com/2014/06/23/my-blog-has-moved/","blogid":"380","blogdomain":"fatgirl.areavoices.com","hostname":"fatgirl.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"My blog has moved","content":"Hello dear readers of my Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl Blog! I am just posting here again to let you know that my blog has moved to its own website. And, you can find it by clicking here.\n\nThe reason I moved it to its own website is because I wanted a fresh, new look and I wanted it to have its own presence. (If that makes any sense!)\n\nAnyway, on the new website, www.confessionsofaformerfatgirlblog.com, you can learn more about me through the \"Learn More\" section, which includes before and after pictures. You can also follow my blog through email by clicking on the \"Follow\" link. Additionally, you can see what pictures I have posted on Instagram, search my blog, see recent posts and see what blogs I am following, such as sweet sweat life, Runs for Cookies and Father Knows Last. All of them are awesome blogs!\n\nSo, my dear readers, to get all the latest and greatest from me, the former fat girl, please go to my website, Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl. Hope to see you all there!\n\nOh, by the way, check out my latest blog post, Summer Running and New Food Finds and feel free to leave me a message. I love hearing from my readers!\n\nTake care and see you at my new website!\n\nHere's a preview:\n\n\n\n ","rawcontent":"Hello dear readers of my Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl Blog! I am just posting here again to let you know that my blog has moved to its own website. And, you can find it by clicking here.\n\nThe reason I moved it to its own website is because I wanted a fresh, new look and I wanted it to have its own presence. (If that makes any sense!)\n\nAnyway, on the new website, www.confessionsofaformerfatgirlblog.com, you can learn more about me through the \"Learn More\" section, which includes before and after pictures. You can also follow my blog through email by clicking on the \"Follow\" link. Additionally, you can see what pictures I have posted on Instagram, search my blog, see recent posts and see what blogs I am following, such as sweet sweat life, Runs for Cookies and Father Knows Last. All of them are awesome blogs!\n\nSo, my dear readers, to get all the latest and greatest from me, the former fat girl, please go to my website, Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl. Hope to see you all there!\n\nOh, by the way, check out my latest blog post, Summer Running and New Food Finds and feel free to leave me a message. I love hearing from my readers!\n\nTake care and see you at my new website!\n\nHere's a preview:\n\n\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"Hello dear readers of my Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl Blog! I am just posting here again to let you know that my blog has moved to its own website. And, you can find it by clicking here.\n\nThe reason I moved it to its own website is because I wanted a fresh, new look and I wanted it to have its own presence. (If that makes any sense!)\n\nAnyway, on the new website, www.confessionsofaformerfatgirlblog.com, you can learn more about me through the \"Learn More\" section, which includes before and after pictures. You can also follow my blog through email by clicking on the \"Follow\" link. Additionally, you can see what pictures I have posted on Instagram, search my blog, see recent posts and see what blogs I am following, such as sweet sweat life, Runs for Cookies and Father Knows Last. All of them are awesome blogs!\n\nSo, my dear readers, to get all the latest and greatest from me, the former fat girl, please go to my website, Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl. Hope to see you all there!\n\nOh, by the way, check out my latest blog post, Summer Running and New Food Finds and feel free to leave me a message. I love hearing from my readers!\n\nTake care and see you at my new website!\n\nHere's a preview:\n\n\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Celeste","author_s":"http://fatgirl.areavoices.com/author/fatgirl/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-06-23T14:08:58Z","displaydate":"2014-06-23 09:08:58","displaymodified":"2014-06-23 09:15:34","tags":["alexandria mn","blogs","celeste edenloff","confessions","diet and exercise","fitness","food","former fat girl","fun","health","healthy living journey","run","runner","running","weight loss","weight loss journey","weight watchers","wordpress","ww"],"categories":["Body","Exercise","Family","Fitness","Food","Health","Public Speaking","Recipes","Running","Weight","Weight Watchers"],"spell":["My blog has moved","Hello dear readers of my Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl Blog! I am just posting here again to let you know that my blog has moved to its own website. And, you can find it by clicking here.\n\nThe reason I moved it to its own website is because I wanted a fresh, new look and I wanted it to have its own presence. (If that makes any sense!)\n\nAnyway, on the new website, www.confessionsofaformerfatgirlblog.com, you can learn more about me through the \"Learn More\" section, which includes before and after pictures. You can also follow my blog through email by clicking on the \"Follow\" link. Additionally, you can see what pictures I have posted on Instagram, search my blog, see recent posts and see what blogs I am following, such as sweet sweat life, Runs for Cookies and Father Knows Last. All of them are awesome blogs!\n\nSo, my dear readers, to get all the latest and greatest from me, the former fat girl, please go to my website, Confessions of a [former] Fat Girl. Hope to see you all there!\n\nOh, by the way, check out my latest blog post, Summer Running and New Food Finds and feel free to leave me a message. I love hearing from my readers!\n\nTake care and see you at my new website!\n\nHere's a preview:\n\n\n\n ","Celeste"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:birder.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":712,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"birder.areavoices.com/86190","permalink":"http://birder.areavoices.com/2013/11/20/30/","blogid":"126","blogdomain":"birder.areavoices.com","hostname":"birder.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"-30-","content":"\"-30-\" is the way we old-school journalists used to let our editors know we were at the end of our story. We wrote our stories on these curious devices known as \"typewriters.\" \nThey were pretty neat. I never knew one to crash or lock up. They never stopped working while a spinning wheel appeared in front of my eyes. Each typewriter had its own printer. Some of them even ran without electricity. Nothing to plug in; no battery to charge.\nYou'd finish the story, pull it out of the typewriter and scrawl \"-30-\" on the bottom before handing it to the editor, who had the satisfaction of marking it with a thick, black pencil.\nEditors were a lot happier in those days, I think.\nSo I headed this post with \"-30-\" because it's the end of the Wannabe Birder.\nThe decision, entirely my own, comes with mixed feelings. If it had just been me writing my thoughts and observations about birds, there would be no such mixed feelings. Frankly, if it had just been that, I would have gotten bored with this blog a long time ago.\nBut the delightful comments and stories and wonderful pictures that came from all over made this blog a joy to produce. \nOne such contribution arrived in the mail just yesterday:\n\n\n\nThis portrait of a chickadee was taken by Lynn Laveau Lund through her kitchen window in Cloquet. \"I'm glad it was clean!\" Lynn wrote about that window.\nMe, too.\nLynn's picture was the first I can recall coming in the real mail instead of via email.\nWe got lots of real mail when we used typewriters.\nBut back to closing the blog: When I started writing it five-something years ago, my job responsibilities at the Duluth News Tribune were much different than they are now. \nMy reporting gig has made it increasingly difficult to find time for the blog. That has been all the more true as I've focused more and more of my attention on covering health, a topic that just seems to keep getting bigger. \nIn fact, as I've reported on health I've come across all sorts of things that would be ideal for a blog. So if you have any interest in health-related subjects, please join me on my new health news blog, which will be launching on Area Voices soon. \nOne detail that hasn't been worked out is the name, but it definitely won't be called the Wannabe Doctor.\nWe're not totally killing the birder blog, and I'm told this post and all that preceded it will remain on the Internet for, you know, a long time. \nThank you for reading and thanks, especially, to those who contributed and made this a lot of fun. \n","rawcontent":"\"-30-\" is the way we old-school journalists used to let our editors know we were at the end of our story. We wrote our stories on these curious devices known as \"typewriters.\" \nThey were pretty neat. I never knew one to crash or lock up. They never stopped working while a spinning wheel appeared in front of my eyes. Each typewriter had its own printer. Some of them even ran without electricity. Nothing to plug in; no battery to charge.\nYou'd finish the story, pull it out of the typewriter and scrawl \"-30-\" on the bottom before handing it to the editor, who had the satisfaction of marking it with a thick, black pencil.\nEditors were a lot happier in those days, I think.\nSo I headed this post with \"-30-\" because it's the end of the Wannabe Birder.\nThe decision, entirely my own, comes with mixed feelings. If it had just been me writing my thoughts and observations about birds, there would be no such mixed feelings. Frankly, if it had just been that, I would have gotten bored with this blog a long time ago.\nBut the delightful comments and stories and wonderful pictures that came from all over made this blog a joy to produce. \nOne such contribution arrived in the mail just yesterday:\n\n\n\nThis portrait of a chickadee was taken by Lynn Laveau Lund through her kitchen window in Cloquet. \"I'm glad it was clean!\" Lynn wrote about that window.\nMe, too.\nLynn's picture was the first I can recall coming in the real mail instead of via email.\nWe got lots of real mail when we used typewriters.\nBut back to closing the blog: When I started writing it five-something years ago, my job responsibilities at the Duluth News Tribune were much different than they are now. \nMy reporting gig has made it increasingly difficult to find time for the blog. That has been all the more true as I've focused more and more of my attention on covering health, a topic that just seems to keep getting bigger. \nIn fact, as I've reported on health I've come across all sorts of things that would be ideal for a blog. So if you have any interest in health-related subjects, please join me on my new health news blog, which will be launching on Area Voices soon. \nOne detail that hasn't been worked out is the name, but it definitely won't be called the Wannabe Doctor.\nWe're not totally killing the birder blog, and I'm told this post and all that preceded it will remain on the Internet for, you know, a long time. \nThank you for reading and thanks, especially, to those who contributed and made this a lot of fun. \n","contentnoshortcodes":"\"-30-\" is the way we old-school journalists used to let our editors know we were at the end of our story. We wrote our stories on these curious devices known as \"typewriters.\" \nThey were pretty neat. I never knew one to crash or lock up. They never stopped working while a spinning wheel appeared in front of my eyes. Each typewriter had its own printer. Some of them even ran without electricity. Nothing to plug in; no battery to charge.\nYou'd finish the story, pull it out of the typewriter and scrawl \"-30-\" on the bottom before handing it to the editor, who had the satisfaction of marking it with a thick, black pencil.\nEditors were a lot happier in those days, I think.\nSo I headed this post with \"-30-\" because it's the end of the Wannabe Birder.\nThe decision, entirely my own, comes with mixed feelings. If it had just been me writing my thoughts and observations about birds, there would be no such mixed feelings. Frankly, if it had just been that, I would have gotten bored with this blog a long time ago.\nBut the delightful comments and stories and wonderful pictures that came from all over made this blog a joy to produce. \nOne such contribution arrived in the mail just yesterday:\n\n\n\nThis portrait of a chickadee was taken by Lynn Laveau Lund through her kitchen window in Cloquet. \"I'm glad it was clean!\" Lynn wrote about that window.\nMe, too.\nLynn's picture was the first I can recall coming in the real mail instead of via email.\nWe got lots of real mail when we used typewriters.\nBut back to closing the blog: When I started writing it five-something years ago, my job responsibilities at the Duluth News Tribune were much different than they are now. \nMy reporting gig has made it increasingly difficult to find time for the blog. That has been all the more true as I've focused more and more of my attention on covering health, a topic that just seems to keep getting bigger. \nIn fact, as I've reported on health I've come across all sorts of things that would be ideal for a blog. So if you have any interest in health-related subjects, please join me on my new health news blog, which will be launching on Area Voices soon. \nOne detail that hasn't been worked out is the name, but it definitely won't be called the Wannabe Doctor.\nWe're not totally killing the birder blog, and I'm told this post and all that preceded it will remain on the Internet for, you know, a long time. \nThank you for reading and thanks, especially, to those who contributed and made this a lot of fun. \n","numcomments":0,"author":"birder","author_s":"http://birder.areavoices.com/author/birder/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-11-20T22:23:52Z","displaydate":"2013-11-20 17:23:52","displaymodified":"2013-11-20 17:23:52","tags":["birding","blogs","outdoors","Wannabe Birder"],"spell":["-30-","\"-30-\" is the way we old-school journalists used to let our editors know we were at the end of our story. We wrote our stories on these curious devices known as \"typewriters.\" \nThey were pretty neat. I never knew one to crash or lock up. They never stopped working while a spinning wheel appeared in front of my eyes. Each typewriter had its own printer. Some of them even ran without electricity. Nothing to plug in; no battery to charge.\nYou'd finish the story, pull it out of the typewriter and scrawl \"-30-\" on the bottom before handing it to the editor, who had the satisfaction of marking it with a thick, black pencil.\nEditors were a lot happier in those days, I think.\nSo I headed this post with \"-30-\" because it's the end of the Wannabe Birder.\nThe decision, entirely my own, comes with mixed feelings. If it had just been me writing my thoughts and observations about birds, there would be no such mixed feelings. Frankly, if it had just been that, I would have gotten bored with this blog a long time ago.\nBut the delightful comments and stories and wonderful pictures that came from all over made this blog a joy to produce. \nOne such contribution arrived in the mail just yesterday:\n\n\n\nThis portrait of a chickadee was taken by Lynn Laveau Lund through her kitchen window in Cloquet. \"I'm glad it was clean!\" Lynn wrote about that window.\nMe, too.\nLynn's picture was the first I can recall coming in the real mail instead of via email.\nWe got lots of real mail when we used typewriters.\nBut back to closing the blog: When I started writing it five-something years ago, my job responsibilities at the Duluth News Tribune were much different than they are now. \nMy reporting gig has made it increasingly difficult to find time for the blog. That has been all the more true as I've focused more and more of my attention on covering health, a topic that just seems to keep getting bigger. \nIn fact, as I've reported on health I've come across all sorts of things that would be ideal for a blog. So if you have any interest in health-related subjects, please join me on my new health news blog, which will be launching on Area Voices soon. \nOne detail that hasn't been worked out is the name, but it definitely won't be called the Wannabe Doctor.\nWe're not totally killing the birder blog, and I'm told this post and all that preceded it will remain on the Internet for, you know, a long time. \nThank you for reading and thanks, especially, to those who contributed and made this a lot of fun. \n","birder"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:chefjeff.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":836,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"chefjeff.areavoices.com/87528","permalink":"http://chefjeff.areavoices.com/2013/02/08/chipotle-black-bean-chili/","blogid":"200","blogdomain":"chefjeff.areavoices.com","hostname":"chefjeff.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Chipotle Black Bean Chili","content":"Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isn’t a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that I’ll make when she’s out of town.\n\nBut that’s not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","rawcontent":"Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isnt a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that Ill make when shes out of town.\n\nBut thats not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","contentnoshortcodes":"Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isnt a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that Ill make when shes out of town.\n\nBut thats not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","numcomments":0,"author":"chefjeff","author_s":"http://chefjeff.areavoices.com/author/chefjeff/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-02-08T19:31:13Z","displaydate":"2013-02-08 14:31:13","displaymodified":"2013-02-08 14:31:13","tags":["Beans","black beans","chef jeff","chili","food","jeff tiedeman","recipes"],"spell":["Chipotle Black Bean Chili","Have you every wondered why black beans have become so popular in the United States in recent years? They've long been a staple in our south-of-the-border neighbor, Mexico, where they're called frijoles negros.\n\nNow, Americans have discovered that black beans not only are uniquely delicious but nutritious as well.\n\nFew foods have as solid a nutritional profile as black beans. They are loaded with protein and fiber. As as far as antioxidants, black beans have at least eight different flavonoids, the color-producing phytonutrients pigments that work together with vitamins to help the body avoid oxygen-related damage.\n\nBlack beans also contain small amounts of omega 3-fatty acids, about three times that available from many other beans, including kidney beans.\n\nOver the years, I've enjoyed black beans in a variety of dishes from soups to stews to chilis, which brings me to following recipe, which was passed on to me by Mark Haley of Grand Forks.\n\nMark, who along with his wife, Bonnie, owns Bon Voyage Travel Agency, does the majority of cooking in their household. Recently, I shared with him my penchant for spicy foods, and not too long after that, he shared this black bean chili recipe with me.\n\nI've yet to try the chili, mainly because Therese isn’t a big fan of spicy food and it contains a variety of hot pepper, chipotle. It's one of those recipes that I’ll make when she’s out of town.\n\nBut that’s not to say I have to wait to try it.\n\nChipotle Black Bean Chili\n1 pound Jimmy Dean Premium Pork Hot Sausage\n1/2 pound ground beef\n28 ounces chicken broth\n1 14 1/2-ounce can black beans, drained and rinsed\n1 16-ounce jar picante sauce\n2 cups frozen diced hash browns\n1 15 1/4-ounce can whole-kernel corn\n2 chipotle peppers in adobo sauce, diced\n2 teaspoons chili powder\n1 teaspoon oregano\n1 teaspoon cumin\nSalt and pepper to taste\nBrown sausage and ground beef. Drain fat.\nAdd remaining and bring to a boil over medium heat. Reduce heat and simmer for 2 hours.","chefjeff"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:samcook.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":1791,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"samcook.areavoices.com/89070","permalink":"http://samcook.areavoices.com/2014/07/14/night-fishing-will-open-july-21-on-mille-lacs-lake/","blogid":"961","blogdomain":"samcook.areavoices.com","hostname":"samcook.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Night fishing will open July 21 on Mille Lacs Lake","content":"The night-fishing ban for walleye anglers on Mille Lacs Lake will be lifted July 21 at 10 p.m., according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.\n\nIn past years, the Mille Lacs Lake night closure, from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., began the Monday after the May opener and continued through mid-June. This year’s regulations originally extended the closure to Dec. 1 to help ensure state-licensed anglers did not catch more walleyes than the lake’s safe harvest limit allowed. If that limit was reached, anglers would have had to release all walleyes instead of being allowed to keep two. The possession limit is two fish from 18 to 20 inches. One fish may be longer than 28 inches.\n\nThe night-fishing ban was lifted because anglers are catching fewer walleyes on the lake this summer. So far, anglers have caught about 10,000 pounds of walleyes, DNR officials said. Fisheries officials believe anglers won't catch more than the harvest limit of 42,900 pounds of walleyes.\n\nAnglers have caught fewer walleye because walleyes are feeding on an abundance of perch in Mille Lacs this year and because of reduced fishing pressure.\n\n“The DNR is not removing the night closure because Mille Lacs Lake has recovered,” said Don Pereira, DNR fisheries section chief. “More young walleye still need to survive their first year and keep growing from year to year into larger walleye. Conditions this year combined for a slow bite, allowing DNR to re-open an activity that helps the Mille Lacs area economy and is a tradition among many fishing families.”","rawcontent":"The night-fishing ban for walleye anglers on Mille Lacs Lake will be lifted July 21 at 10 p.m., according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.\n\nIn past years, the Mille Lacs Lake night closure, from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., began the Monday after the May opener and continued through mid-June. This years regulations originally extended the closure to Dec. 1 to help ensure state-licensed anglers did not catch more walleyes than the lakes safe harvest limit allowed. If that limit was reached, anglers would have had to release all walleyes instead of being allowed to keep two. The possession limit is two fish from 18 to 20 inches. One fish may be longer than 28 inches.\n\nThe night-fishing ban was lifted because anglers are catching fewer walleyes on the lake this summer. So far, anglers have caught about 10,000 pounds of walleyes, DNR officials said. Fisheries officials believe anglers won't catch more than the harvest limit of 42,900 pounds of walleyes.\n\nAnglers have caught fewer walleye because walleyes are feeding on an abundance of perch in Mille Lacs this year and because of reduced fishing pressure.\n\nThe DNR is not removing the night closure because Mille Lacs Lake has recovered, said Don Pereira, DNR fisheries section chief. More young walleye still need to survive their first year and keep growing from year to year into larger walleye. Conditions this year combined for a slow bite, allowing DNR to re-open an activity that helps the Mille Lacs area economy and is a tradition among many fishing families.","contentnoshortcodes":"The night-fishing ban for walleye anglers on Mille Lacs Lake will be lifted July 21 at 10 p.m., according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.\n\nIn past years, the Mille Lacs Lake night closure, from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., began the Monday after the May opener and continued through mid-June. This years regulations originally extended the closure to Dec. 1 to help ensure state-licensed anglers did not catch more walleyes than the lakes safe harvest limit allowed. If that limit was reached, anglers would have had to release all walleyes instead of being allowed to keep two. The possession limit is two fish from 18 to 20 inches. One fish may be longer than 28 inches.\n\nThe night-fishing ban was lifted because anglers are catching fewer walleyes on the lake this summer. So far, anglers have caught about 10,000 pounds of walleyes, DNR officials said. Fisheries officials believe anglers won't catch more than the harvest limit of 42,900 pounds of walleyes.\n\nAnglers have caught fewer walleye because walleyes are feeding on an abundance of perch in Mille Lacs this year and because of reduced fishing pressure.\n\nThe DNR is not removing the night closure because Mille Lacs Lake has recovered, said Don Pereira, DNR fisheries section chief. More young walleye still need to survive their first year and keep growing from year to year into larger walleye. Conditions this year combined for a slow bite, allowing DNR to re-open an activity that helps the Mille Lacs area economy and is a tradition among many fishing families.","numcomments":0,"author":"Sam Cook","author_s":"http://samcook.areavoices.com/author/samcook/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-14T20:21:18Z","displaydate":"2014-07-14 20:21:18","displaymodified":"2014-07-14 20:21:18","tags":["fishing","outdoors"],"spell":["Night fishing will open July 21 on Mille Lacs Lake","The night-fishing ban for walleye anglers on Mille Lacs Lake will be lifted July 21 at 10 p.m., according to the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources.\n\nIn past years, the Mille Lacs Lake night closure, from 10 p.m. to 6 a.m., began the Monday after the May opener and continued through mid-June. This year’s regulations originally extended the closure to Dec. 1 to help ensure state-licensed anglers did not catch more walleyes than the lake’s safe harvest limit allowed. If that limit was reached, anglers would have had to release all walleyes instead of being allowed to keep two. The possession limit is two fish from 18 to 20 inches. One fish may be longer than 28 inches.\n\nThe night-fishing ban was lifted because anglers are catching fewer walleyes on the lake this summer. So far, anglers have caught about 10,000 pounds of walleyes, DNR officials said. Fisheries officials believe anglers won't catch more than the harvest limit of 42,900 pounds of walleyes.\n\nAnglers have caught fewer walleye because walleyes are feeding on an abundance of perch in Mille Lacs this year and because of reduced fishing pressure.\n\n“The DNR is not removing the night closure because Mille Lacs Lake has recovered,” said Don Pereira, DNR fisheries section chief. “More young walleye still need to survive their first year and keep growing from year to year into larger walleye. Conditions this year combined for a slow bite, allowing DNR to re-open an activity that helps the Mille Lacs area economy and is a tradition among many fishing families.”","Sam Cook"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:thenewforty.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":1785,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"thenewforty.areavoices.com/93130","permalink":"http://thenewforty.areavoices.com/2014/05/30/what-a-fabulous-legacy/","blogid":"1093","blogdomain":"thenewforty.areavoices.com","hostname":"thenewforty.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"What a fabulous legacy...","content":"Yesterday was Miss Sparkle's last day of ninth grade.  It left her a little melancholy.  It left me a little melancholy as well.  A whole year passed so quickly.  I never cease to be amazed at how quickly the time goes.\n\nI confess that I was happy to be relieved of the additional time burden that driving back and forth to Sheyenne High School imposed on my schedule.  Next year, Cheyenne will be at West Fargo High School - a mere handful of minutes away from our house.  I am almost gleeful about this.  I am not gleeful that Cheyenne has to change schools again, but this is what West Fargo School District came up with as a short-term fix - all the 9th graders were at Sheyenne High School this past school year.\n\nNow Cheyenne will be in a new high school as a sophomore.  I am sure she will be fine.  A good chunk of her STEM friends (her 6th-8th grade academic home) will go with her to West Fargo High School, but not all of them.  That was concerning me for a bit, but I realized today that those STEM bonds will never leave her.\n\nYesterday, Cheyenne and a group of former STEMers attended a gathering they instigated at the field behind their old school.  A number of their former teachers and their former principal attended as well.  It seemed like a simple little gathering, but it sure did mean an awful lot to Cheyenne and her friends.  The STEM program always had a heart of its own and it beats on even though the kids are in high school and the teachers have been distributed to different sites around the district.  Once a STEMer, always a STEMer.\n\nWhat a fabulous legacy for the West Fargo School District's STEM Program. ;-)\n\n\nA mini-STEM reunion on the last day of ninth grade.\n\n\n\nDay one thousand four hundred and twenty-three of the new forty – obla di obla da\n\nMs. C\n\n","rawcontent":"Yesterday was Miss Sparkle's last day of ninth grade. It left her a little melancholy. It left me a little melancholy as well. A whole year passed so quickly. I never cease to be amazed at how quickly the time goes.\n\nI confess that I was happy to be relieved of the additional time burden that driving back and forth to Sheyenne High School imposed on my schedule. Next year, Cheyenne will be at West Fargo High School - a mere handful of minutes away from our house. I am almost gleeful about this. I am not gleeful that Cheyenne has to change schools again, but this is what West Fargo School District came up with as a short-term fix - all the 9th graders were at Sheyenne High School this past school year.\n\nNow Cheyenne will be in a new high school as a sophomore. I am sure she will be fine. A good chunk of her STEM friends (her 6th-8th grade academic home) will go with her to West Fargo High School, but not all of them. That was concerning me for a bit, but I realized today that those STEM bonds will never leave her.\n\nYesterday, Cheyenne and a group of former STEMers attended a gathering they instigated at the field behind their old school. A number of their former teachers and their former principal attended as well. It seemed like a simple little gathering, but it sure did mean an awful lot to Cheyenne and her friends. The STEM program always had a heart of its own and it beats on even though the kids are in high school and the teachers have been distributed to different sites around the district. Once a STEMer, always a STEMer.\n\nWhat a fabulous legacy for the West Fargo School District's STEM Program. ;-)\n\n\nA mini-STEM reunion on the last day of ninth grade.\n\n\n\nDay one thousand four hundred and twenty-three of the new forty obla di obla da\n\nMs. C\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"Yesterday was Miss Sparkle's last day of ninth grade. It left her a little melancholy. It left me a little melancholy as well. A whole year passed so quickly. I never cease to be amazed at how quickly the time goes.\n\nI confess that I was happy to be relieved of the additional time burden that driving back and forth to Sheyenne High School imposed on my schedule. Next year, Cheyenne will be at West Fargo High School - a mere handful of minutes away from our house. I am almost gleeful about this. I am not gleeful that Cheyenne has to change schools again, but this is what West Fargo School District came up with as a short-term fix - all the 9th graders were at Sheyenne High School this past school year.\n\nNow Cheyenne will be in a new high school as a sophomore. I am sure she will be fine. A good chunk of her STEM friends (her 6th-8th grade academic home) will go with her to West Fargo High School, but not all of them. That was concerning me for a bit, but I realized today that those STEM bonds will never leave her.\n\nYesterday, Cheyenne and a group of former STEMers attended a gathering they instigated at the field behind their old school. A number of their former teachers and their former principal attended as well. It seemed like a simple little gathering, but it sure did mean an awful lot to Cheyenne and her friends. The STEM program always had a heart of its own and it beats on even though the kids are in high school and the teachers have been distributed to different sites around the district. Once a STEMer, always a STEMer.\n\nWhat a fabulous legacy for the West Fargo School District's STEM Program. ;-)\n\n\nA mini-STEM reunion on the last day of ninth grade.\n\n\n\nDay one thousand four hundred and twenty-three of the new forty obla di obla da\n\nMs. C\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Ms. C","author_s":"http://thenewforty.areavoices.com/author/thenewforty/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-05-31T00:32:10Z","displaydate":"2014-05-30 19:32:10","displaymodified":"2014-05-31 19:43:22","tags":["cheyenne","friends","relationships","school","STEM Center","West Fargo School District"],"spell":["What a fabulous legacy...","Yesterday was Miss Sparkle's last day of ninth grade.  It left her a little melancholy.  It left me a little melancholy as well.  A whole year passed so quickly.  I never cease to be amazed at how quickly the time goes.\n\nI confess that I was happy to be relieved of the additional time burden that driving back and forth to Sheyenne High School imposed on my schedule.  Next year, Cheyenne will be at West Fargo High School - a mere handful of minutes away from our house.  I am almost gleeful about this.  I am not gleeful that Cheyenne has to change schools again, but this is what West Fargo School District came up with as a short-term fix - all the 9th graders were at Sheyenne High School this past school year.\n\nNow Cheyenne will be in a new high school as a sophomore.  I am sure she will be fine.  A good chunk of her STEM friends (her 6th-8th grade academic home) will go with her to West Fargo High School, but not all of them.  That was concerning me for a bit, but I realized today that those STEM bonds will never leave her.\n\nYesterday, Cheyenne and a group of former STEMers attended a gathering they instigated at the field behind their old school.  A number of their former teachers and their former principal attended as well.  It seemed like a simple little gathering, but it sure did mean an awful lot to Cheyenne and her friends.  The STEM program always had a heart of its own and it beats on even though the kids are in high school and the teachers have been distributed to different sites around the district.  Once a STEMer, always a STEMer.\n\nWhat a fabulous legacy for the West Fargo School District's STEM Program. ;-)\n\n\nA mini-STEM reunion on the last day of ninth grade.\n\n\n\nDay one thousand four hundred and twenty-three of the new forty – obla di obla da\n\nMs. C\n\n","Ms. C"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:onmymind.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":892,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"onmymind.areavoices.com/91556","permalink":"http://onmymind.areavoices.com/2014/05/16/book-giveaway-experience/","blogid":"802","blogdomain":"onmymind.areavoices.com","hostname":"onmymind.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Book giveaway experience","content":"[gallery order=\"DESC\" columns=\"4\"]\n\nThis is part 2 of my book giveaway experience as a World Book Night volunteer. See part 1 Spreading the love of reading.\n\nIt's the first year that I am a book giver for World Book Night.\n\nI was supposed to give away all 20 copies of my #WBN2014 book “100 Best-Loved Poems” on April 23, but due to bad weather and lack of time, I didn't finish the task. I only give away six copies.\n\nOn April 25, I gave away the second batch of five books.\n\nToday, I walked around the Minnesota State Capitol during lunch time and finally gave away the rest of the books. I saved one copy for my Little Free Library.\n\nThe book giveaway experience was interesting. What surprised me the most was giving away books is not as easy as I thought. When I approached people and asked them if they would like a free book, I got some skeptical and indifferent  reaction.  Some had no interest and walked away, with a \"Don't bother me!\" or \"What do you want from me?\" kind of attitude.\n\nI saw several groups of middle or high school students on field trips today by the Capitol. I approached a few of the groups, the first few said no.  Students seemed to be concerned about talking to strangers.  Only the girls in the last group reacted enthusiastically and welcomed my books. I had three left. So the 4th girl in the photo didn't get the book.\n\nNext year, I will do it again. But I will ask for a more popular book. Hopefully a more popular book will be better received and will bring a more enthusiastic reaction.\n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"[gallery order=\"DESC\" columns=\"4\"]\n\nThis is part 2 of my book giveaway experience as aWorld Book Nightvolunteer. See part 1Spreading the love of reading.\n\nIt's the first year thatI am a book giver for World Book Night.\n\nI was supposed to give away all 20 copies of my#WBN2014 book100 Best-Loved Poems on April 23, but due to bad weather and lack of time, I didn't finish the task. I only give away six copies.\n\nOn April 25, I gave away the second batch of five books.\n\nToday, I walked around the Minnesota State Capitol during lunch time and finally gave away the rest of the books. I saved one copy for my Little Free Library.\n\nThe book giveaway experience was interesting. What surprised me the most was giving away books is not as easy as I thought. When I approached people and asked them if they would like a free book, I got some skeptical and indifferent reaction. Some had no interest and walked away, with a \"Don't bother me!\" or \"What do you want from me?\" kind of attitude.\n\nI saw several groups of middle or high school students on field trips today by the Capitol. I approached a few of the groups, the first few said no. Students seemed to be concerned about talking to strangers. Only the girls in the last group reacted enthusiastically and welcomed my books. I had three left. So the 4th girl in the photo didn't get the book.\n\nNext year, I will do it again. But I will ask for a more popular book. Hopefully a more popular book will be better received and will bring a more enthusiastic reaction.\n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\nThis is part 2 of my book giveaway experience as aWorld Book Nightvolunteer. See part 1Spreading the love of reading.\n\nIt's the first year thatI am a book giver for World Book Night.\n\nI was supposed to give away all 20 copies of my#WBN2014 book100 Best-Loved Poems on April 23, but due to bad weather and lack of time, I didn't finish the task. I only give away six copies.\n\nOn April 25, I gave away the second batch of five books.\n\nToday, I walked around the Minnesota State Capitol during lunch time and finally gave away the rest of the books. I saved one copy for my Little Free Library.\n\nThe book giveaway experience was interesting. What surprised me the most was giving away books is not as easy as I thought. When I approached people and asked them if they would like a free book, I got some skeptical and indifferent reaction. Some had no interest and walked away, with a \"Don't bother me!\" or \"What do you want from me?\" kind of attitude.\n\nI saw several groups of middle or high school students on field trips today by the Capitol. I approached a few of the groups, the first few said no. Students seemed to be concerned about talking to strangers. Only the girls in the last group reacted enthusiastically and welcomed my books. I had three left. So the 4th girl in the photo didn't get the book.\n\nNext year, I will do it again. But I will ask for a more popular book. Hopefully a more popular book will be better received and will bring a more enthusiastic reaction.\n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Qin Tang","author_s":"http://onmymind.areavoices.com/author/onmymind/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-05-17T04:57:53Z","displaydate":"2014-05-16 23:57:53","displaymodified":"2014-05-17 00:58:07","tags":["World Book Night"],"categories":["Book"],"spell":["Book giveaway experience","[gallery order=\"DESC\" columns=\"4\"]\n\nThis is part 2 of my book giveaway experience as a World Book Night volunteer. See part 1 Spreading the love of reading.\n\nIt's the first year that I am a book giver for World Book Night.\n\nI was supposed to give away all 20 copies of my #WBN2014 book “100 Best-Loved Poems” on April 23, but due to bad weather and lack of time, I didn't finish the task. I only give away six copies.\n\nOn April 25, I gave away the second batch of five books.\n\nToday, I walked around the Minnesota State Capitol during lunch time and finally gave away the rest of the books. I saved one copy for my Little Free Library.\n\nThe book giveaway experience was interesting. What surprised me the most was giving away books is not as easy as I thought. When I approached people and asked them if they would like a free book, I got some skeptical and indifferent  reaction.  Some had no interest and walked away, with a \"Don't bother me!\" or \"What do you want from me?\" kind of attitude.\n\nI saw several groups of middle or high school students on field trips today by the Capitol. I approached a few of the groups, the first few said no.  Students seemed to be concerned about talking to strangers.  Only the girls in the last group reacted enthusiastically and welcomed my books. I had three left. So the 4th girl in the photo didn't get the book.\n\nNext year, I will do it again. But I will ask for a more popular book. Hopefully a more popular book will be better received and will bring a more enthusiastic reaction.\n\n \n\n ","Qin Tang"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:farmbleat.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":546,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"farmbleat.areavoices.com/85725","permalink":"http://farmbleat.areavoices.com/2014/07/09/the-princess-and-the-toad/","blogid":"375","blogdomain":"farmbleat.areavoices.com","hostname":"farmbleat.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"The princess and the toad","content":"As my great-niece Kiera and my great-nephew Brody approach their fourth birthdays in the coming months, I’m finding that while they may both have birthdays on the 28th day of the month — hers in August and his in November — the two talkative tykes are very different people.\n\nHe’s blond-haired, blue-eyed and fair-skinned while she’s dark-haired, brown-eyed and darker toned. Those are just the outward differences\n\nBrody is a “Mini-Me” of his father, preferring to spend his time outdoors helping to hunt, trap, fish and work. He gets mud, dust and dirt under his fingernails. Kiera likes frilly dresses, dolls and princesses. She prefers pretty paints on her fingernails — and toenails, too.\n\nBringing them together for a Buntjer cousins reunion last Saturday at Big Stone Lake, hosted by my cousin Monte and his family, proved to be nothing short of entertaining.\n\nIt all began when, just moments after his arrival, little Brody found a rotund yet energetic toad camouflaged in the beach sand on the shore in front of the Buntjer cabin.\n\nWith cat-like reflexes he swooped up the toad and paraded it around for all to see. He’d found a friend for the day!\n\nBrody’s mom speculated her first-born son might even skip lunch to ensure his amphibian companion didn’t escape into the wild blue yonder that is Big Stone Lake.\n\nThe way he gripped the critter, and his determination not to let the toad get more than a foot away from him in the lake, ensured that this poor captured toad was in for a day-long bout of Brody.\n\nAnd then came Kiera.\n\nKiera — the princess-loving, painted toenail promenading preschooler.\n\nShe does not like toads. She does not want to be within 20 feet of toads — and certainly not within 20 feet of a little boy carrying a toad.\n\nThere arose a battle on the beach. Oh, it wasn’t much of a battle, mind you. Brody stood with his feet in the water, holding his toad as if he didn’t have a care in the world.\n\nKiera, meanwhile, was mere feet from her mommy, pointing at Brody and proclaiming, “I don’t like toads!” “I’m NOT going over there!” and making various other comments with one mean-looking scowl on her face.\n\nNow, what else is an auntie to do but laugh at the situation?\n\nIt all seemed quite funny until I looked over at Brody and saw him give the toad a giant smoocheroo — right on the lips!\n\nJust the thought of it now still makes me feel a little queasy!\n\nIf he thought kissing the toad might magically present him with a princess, it wasn’t to be. Then again, perhaps if Kiera kissed the toad she’d find her prince.\n\nIf there was to be any magic that day, I think she would have had better luck killing the toad with her scowl.","rawcontent":"As my great-niece Kiera and my great-nephew Brody approach their fourth birthdays in the coming months, Im finding that while they may both have birthdays on the 28th day of the month hers in August and his in November the two talkative tykes are very different people.\n\nHes blond-haired, blue-eyed and fair-skinned while shes dark-haired, brown-eyed and darker toned. Those are just the outward differences\n\nBrody is a Mini-Me of his father, preferring to spend his time outdoors helping to hunt, trap, fish and work. He gets mud, dust and dirt under his fingernails. Kiera likes frilly dresses, dolls and princesses. She prefers pretty paints on her fingernails and toenails, too.\n\nBringing them together for a Buntjer cousins reunion last Saturday at Big Stone Lake, hosted by my cousin Monte and his family, proved to be nothing short of entertaining.\n\nIt all began when, just moments after his arrival, little Brody found a rotund yet energetic toad camouflaged in the beach sand on the shore in front of the Buntjer cabin.\n\nWith cat-like reflexes he swooped up the toad and paraded it around for all to see. Hed found a friend for the day!\n\nBrodys mom speculated her first-born son might even skip lunch to ensure his amphibian companion didnt escape into the wild blue yonder that is Big Stone Lake.\n\nThe way he gripped the critter, and his determination not to let the toad get more than a foot away from him in the lake, ensured that this poor captured toad was in for a day-long bout of Brody.\n\nAnd then came Kiera.\n\nKiera the princess-loving, painted toenail promenading preschooler.\n\nShe does not like toads. She does not want to be within 20 feet of toads and certainly not within 20 feet of a little boy carrying a toad.\n\nThere arose a battle on the beach. Oh, it wasnt much of a battle, mind you. Brody stood with his feet in the water, holding his toad as if he didnt have a care in the world.\n\nKiera, meanwhile, was mere feet from her mommy, pointing at Brody and proclaiming, I dont like toads! Im NOT going over there! and making various other comments with one mean-looking scowl on her face.\n\nNow, what else is an auntie to do but laugh at the situation?\n\nIt all seemed quite funny until I looked over at Brody and saw him give the toad a giant smoocheroo right on the lips!\n\nJust the thought of it now still makes me feel a little queasy!\n\nIf he thought kissing the toad might magically present him with a princess, it wasnt to be. Then again, perhaps if Kiera kissed the toad shed find her prince.\n\nIf there was to be any magic that day, I think she would have had better luck killing the toad with her scowl.","contentnoshortcodes":"As my great-niece Kiera and my great-nephew Brody approach their fourth birthdays in the coming months, Im finding that while they may both have birthdays on the 28th day of the month hers in August and his in November the two talkative tykes are very different people.\n\nHes blond-haired, blue-eyed and fair-skinned while shes dark-haired, brown-eyed and darker toned. Those are just the outward differences\n\nBrody is a Mini-Me of his father, preferring to spend his time outdoors helping to hunt, trap, fish and work. He gets mud, dust and dirt under his fingernails. Kiera likes frilly dresses, dolls and princesses. She prefers pretty paints on her fingernails and toenails, too.\n\nBringing them together for a Buntjer cousins reunion last Saturday at Big Stone Lake, hosted by my cousin Monte and his family, proved to be nothing short of entertaining.\n\nIt all began when, just moments after his arrival, little Brody found a rotund yet energetic toad camouflaged in the beach sand on the shore in front of the Buntjer cabin.\n\nWith cat-like reflexes he swooped up the toad and paraded it around for all to see. Hed found a friend for the day!\n\nBrodys mom speculated her first-born son might even skip lunch to ensure his amphibian companion didnt escape into the wild blue yonder that is Big Stone Lake.\n\nThe way he gripped the critter, and his determination not to let the toad get more than a foot away from him in the lake, ensured that this poor captured toad was in for a day-long bout of Brody.\n\nAnd then came Kiera.\n\nKiera the princess-loving, painted toenail promenading preschooler.\n\nShe does not like toads. She does not want to be within 20 feet of toads and certainly not within 20 feet of a little boy carrying a toad.\n\nThere arose a battle on the beach. Oh, it wasnt much of a battle, mind you. Brody stood with his feet in the water, holding his toad as if he didnt have a care in the world.\n\nKiera, meanwhile, was mere feet from her mommy, pointing at Brody and proclaiming, I dont like toads! Im NOT going over there! and making various other comments with one mean-looking scowl on her face.\n\nNow, what else is an auntie to do but laugh at the situation?\n\nIt all seemed quite funny until I looked over at Brody and saw him give the toad a giant smoocheroo right on the lips!\n\nJust the thought of it now still makes me feel a little queasy!\n\nIf he thought kissing the toad might magically present him with a princess, it wasnt to be. Then again, perhaps if Kiera kissed the toad shed find her prince.\n\nIf there was to be any magic that day, I think she would have had better luck killing the toad with her scowl.","numcomments":0,"author":"Julie Buntjer","author_s":"http://farmbleat.areavoices.com/author/juliebuntjer/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-09T21:43:33Z","displaydate":"2014-07-09 16:43:33","displaymodified":"2014-07-09 16:44:59","tags":["family","lake","prince","princess","toad"],"spell":["The princess and the toad","As my great-niece Kiera and my great-nephew Brody approach their fourth birthdays in the coming months, I’m finding that while they may both have birthdays on the 28th day of the month — hers in August and his in November — the two talkative tykes are very different people.\n\nHe’s blond-haired, blue-eyed and fair-skinned while she’s dark-haired, brown-eyed and darker toned. Those are just the outward differences\n\nBrody is a “Mini-Me” of his father, preferring to spend his time outdoors helping to hunt, trap, fish and work. He gets mud, dust and dirt under his fingernails. Kiera likes frilly dresses, dolls and princesses. She prefers pretty paints on her fingernails — and toenails, too.\n\nBringing them together for a Buntjer cousins reunion last Saturday at Big Stone Lake, hosted by my cousin Monte and his family, proved to be nothing short of entertaining.\n\nIt all began when, just moments after his arrival, little Brody found a rotund yet energetic toad camouflaged in the beach sand on the shore in front of the Buntjer cabin.\n\nWith cat-like reflexes he swooped up the toad and paraded it around for all to see. He’d found a friend for the day!\n\nBrody’s mom speculated her first-born son might even skip lunch to ensure his amphibian companion didn’t escape into the wild blue yonder that is Big Stone Lake.\n\nThe way he gripped the critter, and his determination not to let the toad get more than a foot away from him in the lake, ensured that this poor captured toad was in for a day-long bout of Brody.\n\nAnd then came Kiera.\n\nKiera — the princess-loving, painted toenail promenading preschooler.\n\nShe does not like toads. She does not want to be within 20 feet of toads — and certainly not within 20 feet of a little boy carrying a toad.\n\nThere arose a battle on the beach. Oh, it wasn’t much of a battle, mind you. Brody stood with his feet in the water, holding his toad as if he didn’t have a care in the world.\n\nKiera, meanwhile, was mere feet from her mommy, pointing at Brody and proclaiming, “I don’t like toads!” “I’m NOT going over there!” and making various other comments with one mean-looking scowl on her face.\n\nNow, what else is an auntie to do but laugh at the situation?\n\nIt all seemed quite funny until I looked over at Brody and saw him give the toad a giant smoocheroo — right on the lips!\n\nJust the thought of it now still makes me feel a little queasy!\n\nIf he thought kissing the toad might magically present him with a princess, it wasn’t to be. Then again, perhaps if Kiera kissed the toad she’d find her prince.\n\nIf there was to be any magic that day, I think she would have had better luck killing the toad with her scowl.","Julie Buntjer"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:momstar.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":169,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"momstar.areavoices.com/26765","permalink":"http://momstar.areavoices.com/2012/03/12/recipe-tomato-and-avocado-salsa/","blogid":"1869","blogdomain":"momstar.areavoices.com","hostname":"momstar.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"RECIPE: Tomato and Avocado Salsa","content":"Did somebody say, \"Olive Garden\"?\n\nWhoa, Marilyn! How did that happen?! You go about your daily routine for decades without any special attention, then pow! Suddenly you're \"viral\"! You go girl!\n\nWhat a joy it's been to watch this phenomenon unfold; my family and I are so looking forward to the upcoming week of Marilyn's appearances in New York City! Wow, what an absolutely wonderful thing to have happen. It's a reminder of the beauty and spontaneity of life - like they say, it's full of surprises!\n\nSome friends are coming over tonight for a casual get-together, and I wanted to try this easy new appetizer recipe to get the party started right.\n\nGreat appetizers are full of flavor to stimulate the appetite, but not so rich that they spoil it. To get that balance, look to fresh, flavorful ingredients. Ripe tomatoes add beautiful color, great taste, and a host of healthy nutrients - like vitamin C - to any appetizer.\n\nHere's a recipe for Tomato and Avocado Salsa - whether you make it mild or spice it up, this salsa will make a lot of mouths happy. Try serving it in individual, wide mouthed glasses so guests can dip and re-dip as much as they like.\n\n\nTomato Tips\nDon't Refrigerate\nFor the best tomato flavor, never refrigerate them. A chilled tomato will not finish ripening because cold halts the ripening process. Cold also kills the flavor of tomatoes, so even when the tomatoes are fully ripe, keep them out of the refrigerator.\nHow Much?\n1 medium tomato, seeded = approximately 3/4 cup chopped.\n1 large tomato, seeded = 1 cup chopped.\n1 pound of tomatoes = approximately 2 1/2 cups chopped, or 2 cups puréed.\n\n\nTomato and Avocado Salsa\nIngredients\n\n\t2 large Florida tomatoes, diced\n\t1 large avocado, peeled, seeded and diced\n\t1/2 cup red onion, chopped\n\t1/2 cup bell pepper, chopped\n\t1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped\n\t1 lime, juiced\n\t1 teaspoon powdered cumin\n\tYour favorite hot sauce (for heat)\n\tKosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste\n\nPreparation\n\n\tIn medium mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Stir to combine.\n\tTaste and adjust seasoning with salt, pepper and hot sauce.\n\tServe at room temperature for best flavor.\n\nServes\nYield 4 to 6 servings\n\nNotes, Tips & Suggestions\nFor hotter version, substitute 1 seeded fresh jalapeño pepper for green pepper. Also, if you prefer, use toasted cumin seed instead of ground cumin.\n\nSource: Florida Tomatoes\n","rawcontent":"Did somebody say, \"Olive Garden\"?\n\nWhoa, Marilyn! How did that happen?! You go about your daily routine for decades without any special attention, then pow! Suddenly you're \"viral\"! You go girl!\n\nWhat a joy it's been to watch this phenomenon unfold; my family and I are so looking forward to the upcoming week of Marilyn's appearances in New York City! Wow, what an absolutely wonderful thing to have happen. It's a reminder of the beauty and spontaneity of life - like they say, it's full of surprises!\n\nSome friends are coming over tonight for a casual get-together, and I wanted to try this easy new appetizer recipe to get the party started right.\n\nGreat appetizers are full of flavor to stimulate the appetite, but not so rich that they spoil it. To get that balance, look to fresh, flavorful ingredients. Ripe tomatoes add beautiful color, great taste, and a host of healthy nutrients - like vitamin C - to any appetizer.\n\nHere's a recipe for Tomato and Avocado Salsa - whether you make it mild or spice it up, this salsa will make a lot of mouths happy. Try serving it in individual, wide mouthed glasses so guests can dip and re-dip as much as they like.\n\n\nTomato Tips\nDon't Refrigerate\nFor the best tomato flavor, never refrigerate them. A chilled tomato will not finish ripening because cold halts the ripening process. Cold also kills the flavor of tomatoes, so even when the tomatoes are fully ripe, keep them out of the refrigerator.\nHow Much?\n1 medium tomato, seeded = approximately 3/4 cup chopped.\n1 large tomato, seeded = 1 cup chopped.\n1 pound of tomatoes = approximately 2 1/2 cups chopped, or 2 cups pured.\n\n\nTomato and Avocado Salsa\nIngredients\n\n2 large Florida tomatoes, diced\n1 large avocado, peeled, seeded and diced\n1/2 cup red onion, chopped\n1/2 cup bell pepper, chopped\n1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped\n1 lime, juiced\n1 teaspoon powdered cumin\nYour favorite hot sauce (for heat)\nKosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste\n\nPreparation\n\nIn medium mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Stir to combine.\nTaste and adjust seasoning with salt, pepper and hot sauce.\nServe at room temperature for best flavor.\n\nServes\nYield 4 to 6 servings\n\nNotes, Tips & Suggestions\nFor hotter version, substitute 1 seeded fresh jalapeo pepper for green pepper. Also, if you prefer, use toasted cumin seed instead of ground cumin.\n\nSource: Florida Tomatoes\n","contentnoshortcodes":"Did somebody say, \"Olive Garden\"?\n\nWhoa, Marilyn! How did that happen?! You go about your daily routine for decades without any special attention, then pow! Suddenly you're \"viral\"! You go girl!\n\nWhat a joy it's been to watch this phenomenon unfold; my family and I are so looking forward to the upcoming week of Marilyn's appearances in New York City! Wow, what an absolutely wonderful thing to have happen. It's a reminder of the beauty and spontaneity of life - like they say, it's full of surprises!\n\nSome friends are coming over tonight for a casual get-together, and I wanted to try this easy new appetizer recipe to get the party started right.\n\nGreat appetizers are full of flavor to stimulate the appetite, but not so rich that they spoil it. To get that balance, look to fresh, flavorful ingredients. Ripe tomatoes add beautiful color, great taste, and a host of healthy nutrients - like vitamin C - to any appetizer.\n\nHere's a recipe for Tomato and Avocado Salsa - whether you make it mild or spice it up, this salsa will make a lot of mouths happy. Try serving it in individual, wide mouthed glasses so guests can dip and re-dip as much as they like.\n\n\nTomato Tips\nDon't Refrigerate\nFor the best tomato flavor, never refrigerate them. A chilled tomato will not finish ripening because cold halts the ripening process. Cold also kills the flavor of tomatoes, so even when the tomatoes are fully ripe, keep them out of the refrigerator.\nHow Much?\n1 medium tomato, seeded = approximately 3/4 cup chopped.\n1 large tomato, seeded = 1 cup chopped.\n1 pound of tomatoes = approximately 2 1/2 cups chopped, or 2 cups pured.\n\n\nTomato and Avocado Salsa\nIngredients\n\n2 large Florida tomatoes, diced\n1 large avocado, peeled, seeded and diced\n1/2 cup red onion, chopped\n1/2 cup bell pepper, chopped\n1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped\n1 lime, juiced\n1 teaspoon powdered cumin\nYour favorite hot sauce (for heat)\nKosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste\n\nPreparation\n\nIn medium mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Stir to combine.\nTaste and adjust seasoning with salt, pepper and hot sauce.\nServe at room temperature for best flavor.\n\nServes\nYield 4 to 6 servings\n\nNotes, Tips & Suggestions\nFor hotter version, substitute 1 seeded fresh jalapeo pepper for green pepper. Also, if you prefer, use toasted cumin seed instead of ground cumin.\n\nSource: Florida Tomatoes\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Lisa Simony","author_s":"http://momstar.areavoices.com/author/momstar/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-03-12T23:57:23Z","displaydate":"2012-03-12 17:57:23","displaymodified":"2012-03-12 17:57:23","tags":["Food","Marilyn Hagerty","Olive Garden","recipes","tomatoes"],"categories":["Food"],"spell":["RECIPE: Tomato and Avocado Salsa","Did somebody say, \"Olive Garden\"?\n\nWhoa, Marilyn! How did that happen?! You go about your daily routine for decades without any special attention, then pow! Suddenly you're \"viral\"! You go girl!\n\nWhat a joy it's been to watch this phenomenon unfold; my family and I are so looking forward to the upcoming week of Marilyn's appearances in New York City! Wow, what an absolutely wonderful thing to have happen. It's a reminder of the beauty and spontaneity of life - like they say, it's full of surprises!\n\nSome friends are coming over tonight for a casual get-together, and I wanted to try this easy new appetizer recipe to get the party started right.\n\nGreat appetizers are full of flavor to stimulate the appetite, but not so rich that they spoil it. To get that balance, look to fresh, flavorful ingredients. Ripe tomatoes add beautiful color, great taste, and a host of healthy nutrients - like vitamin C - to any appetizer.\n\nHere's a recipe for Tomato and Avocado Salsa - whether you make it mild or spice it up, this salsa will make a lot of mouths happy. Try serving it in individual, wide mouthed glasses so guests can dip and re-dip as much as they like.\n\n\nTomato Tips\nDon't Refrigerate\nFor the best tomato flavor, never refrigerate them. A chilled tomato will not finish ripening because cold halts the ripening process. Cold also kills the flavor of tomatoes, so even when the tomatoes are fully ripe, keep them out of the refrigerator.\nHow Much?\n1 medium tomato, seeded = approximately 3/4 cup chopped.\n1 large tomato, seeded = 1 cup chopped.\n1 pound of tomatoes = approximately 2 1/2 cups chopped, or 2 cups puréed.\n\n\nTomato and Avocado Salsa\nIngredients\n\n\t2 large Florida tomatoes, diced\n\t1 large avocado, peeled, seeded and diced\n\t1/2 cup red onion, chopped\n\t1/2 cup bell pepper, chopped\n\t1/4 cup fresh cilantro, chopped\n\t1 lime, juiced\n\t1 teaspoon powdered cumin\n\tYour favorite hot sauce (for heat)\n\tKosher salt and fresh ground pepper to taste\n\nPreparation\n\n\tIn medium mixing bowl, combine all ingredients. Stir to combine.\n\tTaste and adjust seasoning with salt, pepper and hot sauce.\n\tServe at room temperature for best flavor.\n\nServes\nYield 4 to 6 servings\n\nNotes, Tips & Suggestions\nFor hotter version, substitute 1 seeded fresh jalapeño pepper for green pepper. Also, if you prefer, use toasted cumin seed instead of ground cumin.\n\nSource: Florida Tomatoes\n","Lisa Simony"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:kcdrugfree.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":126,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"kcdrugfree.areavoices.com/732","permalink":"http://kcdrugfree.areavoices.com/2014/06/13/alcohol-blackouts-vs-passing-out/","blogid":"5352","blogdomain":"kcdrugfree.areavoices.com","hostname":"kcdrugfree.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Alcohol Blackouts vs. Passing Out","content":"Shining a Light on Alcohol Blackouts\n\n\nBlackout – Amnesia for places a person went or things they did while intoxicated; can involve spotty memory (fragmentary blackout, brownout, or grayout) or large missing chunks of time (en bloc blackout).\n\nBlacking out vs. Passing out – Blacking out from alcohol implies that a person is awake and functioning but unable to create memories for events and actions. Passing out from alcohol implies a person is asleep or unconscious from drinking too much. The two states are quite different.\n\n\n\n\nWhat does it mean when someone says they were “blackout drunk?” How does a blackout differ from “passing out” after drinking, and what are the possible dangerous effects of drinking enough to blackout?\n\nBlackouts are periods of amnesia during which a person actively engages in behaviors like walking and talking but does not create memories for these events as they transpire. This results in missing periods of time in the person’s autobiographical record. Blacking out is quite different from passing out, which means either falling asleep from excessive drinking or literally drinking oneself unconscious.\n\nAll blackouts are not the same and are distinguished by the severity of the amnesia. The most common form of blackout involves spotty memories for events, with islands of memories separated by missing memories in between. This form often is referred to as a fragmentary blackout, a grayout, or a brownout. With this type of blackout, focusing on the islands of memories often helps cue recall for some, but not all, of the missing pieces. Full and complete amnesia often spanning hours  or more is known as an en bloc blackout. With this severe form of blackout, trying to fill in the missing pieces typically is fruitless. The memories were never formed and so no amount of digging will uncover them. They simply don’t exist.\n\nIt seems that alcohol produces blackouts by shutting down circuits that involve the hippocampus, a brain area which plays a central role in consolidating memories for what happens in our day-to-day lives. Information coming into the brain from the world around us is processed in various brain areas and then funneled to the hippocampus, which somehow weaves the information together into a running record of facts and events in our lives, a process called consolidation. By interfering with how these memory circuits work, alcohol creates a void in the record-keeping system.\n\nDuring a blackout, the ability to remember things that happened before the blackout typically is spared. Because of this, even in the midst of a blackout, a person can carry on conversations and even tell stories about events that happened years ago or earlier in the evening while they were intoxicated but not yet in the blackout. Outside observers typically are unaware that an individual is in a blackout. Depending on how much alcohol the person drank and how impaired other brain functions are, a person in the midst of a blackout could appear incredibly drunk—or not overly intoxicated at all.\n\nAnything a person can do while they are drunk and not blacked out they can do while they are blacked out—they just won’t remember it the next day. Depending on how impaired the brain regions involved in decisionmaking and impulse control are, the missing events could range from mundane behaviors, like brushing  teeth, to dangerous and traumatic events like driving a car, getting into a fight, or committing—or being the victim of— a sexual assault or other crime.\n\nBlackouts are surprisingly common, particularly among younger drinkers. Across four waves of the Harvard College Alcohol Study, which spanned the 1990s, roughly 1 in 4 male and female students each year experienced a blackout—defined as not being able to remember places that they went or things they did while drinking. Smaller studies by researchers at Duke University report that roughly 1 in 10 male and female college students and recent high-school graduates experienced at least 1 blackout in the 2 weeks before being surveyed.\n\nResearch suggests that there are several factors that can increase one’s risk of  blacking out, in particular drinking in  ways that cause one’s blood alcohol  concentration (BAC) to rise quickly  and reach a high level. The BAC rises  quickly when lots of alcohol gets into  the bloodstream at once. This could  mean drinking on an empty stomach,  doing shots, chugging alcoholic  beverages, or all three. Being a female  is also a risk factor for several reasons.  Females are more likely to drink on an empty stomach than males, and they tend to drink beverages with higher  concentrations of alcohol than beer,  such as mixed drinks, shots, and wine. From a biological standpoint, they reach higher BACs than males after each drink as a result of differences in the amount of water in the body. In all cases, the best predictor that a drinker will black out is that they have blacked out before. Some people seem to be very susceptible to blackouts, whereas others are relatively resistant to the serious effects of alcohol on memory. Research with twins suggests that if one twin experiences blackouts the other is likely to experience them too, so it seems there is a genetic component to sensitivity to blackouts.\n\nBlackouts aren’t necessarily a sign of a problem with alcohol, but they are always a reason for concern and should prompt a person to consider their relationship with alcohol.\n\nFor more information, see NIAAA’s fact sheet, “Alcohol Overdose: The Dangers of Drinking Too Much.” Available at: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AlcoholOverdoseFactsheet/Overdosefact.htm.","rawcontent":"Shining a Light on Alcohol Blackouts\n\n\nBlackout Amnesia for places a person went or things they did while intoxicated; can involve spotty memory (fragmentary blackout, brownout, or grayout) or large missing chunks of time (en bloc blackout).\n\nBlacking out vs. Passing out Blacking out from alcohol implies that a person is awake and functioning but unable to create memories for events and actions. Passing out from alcohol implies a person is asleep or unconscious from drinking too much. The two states are quite different.\n\n\n\n\nWhat does it mean when someone says they were blackout drunk? How does a blackout differ from passing out after drinking, and what are the possible dangerous effects of drinking enough to blackout?\n\nBlackouts are periods of amnesia during which a person actively engages in behaviors like walking and talking but does not create memories for these events as they transpire. This results in missing periods of time in the persons autobiographical record. Blacking out is quite different from passing out, which means either falling asleep from excessive drinking or literally drinking oneself unconscious.\n\nAll blackouts are not the same and are distinguished by the severity of the amnesia. The most common form of blackout involves spotty memories for events, with islands of memories separated by missing memories in between. This form often is referred to as a fragmentary blackout, a grayout, or a brownout. With this type of blackout, focusing on the islands of memories often helps cue recall for some, but not all, of the missing pieces. Full and complete amnesia often spanning hours or more is known as an en bloc blackout. With this severe form of blackout, trying to fill in the missing pieces typically is fruitless. The memories were never formed and so no amount of digging will uncover them. They simply dont exist.\n\nIt seems that alcohol produces blackouts by shutting down circuits that involve the hippocampus, a brain area which plays a central role in consolidating memories for what happens in our day-to-day lives. Information coming into the brain from the world around us is processed in various brain areas and then funneled to the hippocampus, which somehow weaves the information together into a running record of facts and events in our lives, a process called consolidation. By interfering with how these memory circuits work, alcohol creates a void in the record-keeping system.\n\nDuring a blackout, the ability to remember things that happened before the blackout typically is spared. Because of this, even in the midst of a blackout, a person can carry on conversations and even tell stories about events that happened years ago or earlier in the evening while they were intoxicated but not yet in the blackout. Outside observers typically are unaware that an individual is in a blackout. Depending on how much alcohol the person drank and how impaired other brain functions are, a person in the midst of a blackout could appear incredibly drunkor not overly intoxicated at all.\n\nAnything a person can do while they are drunk and not blacked out they can do while they are blacked outthey just wont remember it the next day. Depending on how impaired the brain regions involved in decisionmaking and impulse control are, the missing events could range from mundane behaviors, like brushing teeth, to dangerous and traumatic events like driving a car, getting into a fight, or committingor being the victim of a sexual assault or other crime.\n\nBlackouts are surprisingly common, particularly among younger drinkers. Across four waves of the Harvard College Alcohol Study, which spanned the 1990s, roughly 1 in 4 male and female students each year experienced a blackoutdefined as not being able to remember places that they went or things they did while drinking. Smaller studies by researchers at Duke University report that roughly 1 in 10 male and female college students and recent high-school graduates experienced at least 1 blackout in the 2 weeks before being surveyed.\n\nResearch suggests that there are several factors that can increase ones risk of blacking out, in particular drinking in ways that cause ones blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to rise quickly and reach a high level. The BAC rises quickly when lots of alcohol gets into the bloodstream at once. This could mean drinking on an empty stomach, doing shots, chugging alcoholic beverages, or all three. Being a female is also a risk factor for several reasons. Females are more likely to drink on an empty stomach than males, and they tend to drink beverages with higher concentrations of alcohol than beer, such as mixed drinks, shots, and wine. From a biological standpoint, they reach higher BACs than males after each drink as a result of differences in the amount of water in the body. In all cases, the best predictor that a drinker will black out is that they have blacked out before. Some people seem to be very susceptible to blackouts, whereas others are relatively resistant to the serious effects of alcohol on memory. Research with twins suggests that if one twin experiences blackouts the other is likely to experience them too, so it seems there is a genetic component to sensitivity to blackouts.\n\nBlackouts arent necessarily a sign of a problem with alcohol, but they are always a reason for concern and should prompt a person to consider their relationship with alcohol.\n\nFor more information, see NIAAAs fact sheet, Alcohol Overdose: The Dangers of Drinking Too Much. Available at: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AlcoholOverdoseFactsheet/Overdosefact.htm.","contentnoshortcodes":"Shining a Light on Alcohol Blackouts\n\n\nBlackout Amnesia for places a person went or things they did while intoxicated; can involve spotty memory (fragmentary blackout, brownout, or grayout) or large missing chunks of time (en bloc blackout).\n\nBlacking out vs. Passing out Blacking out from alcohol implies that a person is awake and functioning but unable to create memories for events and actions. Passing out from alcohol implies a person is asleep or unconscious from drinking too much. The two states are quite different.\n\n\n\n\nWhat does it mean when someone says they were blackout drunk? How does a blackout differ from passing out after drinking, and what are the possible dangerous effects of drinking enough to blackout?\n\nBlackouts are periods of amnesia during which a person actively engages in behaviors like walking and talking but does not create memories for these events as they transpire. This results in missing periods of time in the persons autobiographical record. Blacking out is quite different from passing out, which means either falling asleep from excessive drinking or literally drinking oneself unconscious.\n\nAll blackouts are not the same and are distinguished by the severity of the amnesia. The most common form of blackout involves spotty memories for events, with islands of memories separated by missing memories in between. This form often is referred to as a fragmentary blackout, a grayout, or a brownout. With this type of blackout, focusing on the islands of memories often helps cue recall for some, but not all, of the missing pieces. Full and complete amnesia often spanning hours or more is known as an en bloc blackout. With this severe form of blackout, trying to fill in the missing pieces typically is fruitless. The memories were never formed and so no amount of digging will uncover them. They simply dont exist.\n\nIt seems that alcohol produces blackouts by shutting down circuits that involve the hippocampus, a brain area which plays a central role in consolidating memories for what happens in our day-to-day lives. Information coming into the brain from the world around us is processed in various brain areas and then funneled to the hippocampus, which somehow weaves the information together into a running record of facts and events in our lives, a process called consolidation. By interfering with how these memory circuits work, alcohol creates a void in the record-keeping system.\n\nDuring a blackout, the ability to remember things that happened before the blackout typically is spared. Because of this, even in the midst of a blackout, a person can carry on conversations and even tell stories about events that happened years ago or earlier in the evening while they were intoxicated but not yet in the blackout. Outside observers typically are unaware that an individual is in a blackout. Depending on how much alcohol the person drank and how impaired other brain functions are, a person in the midst of a blackout could appear incredibly drunkor not overly intoxicated at all.\n\nAnything a person can do while they are drunk and not blacked out they can do while they are blacked outthey just wont remember it the next day. Depending on how impaired the brain regions involved in decisionmaking and impulse control are, the missing events could range from mundane behaviors, like brushing teeth, to dangerous and traumatic events like driving a car, getting into a fight, or committingor being the victim of a sexual assault or other crime.\n\nBlackouts are surprisingly common, particularly among younger drinkers. Across four waves of the Harvard College Alcohol Study, which spanned the 1990s, roughly 1 in 4 male and female students each year experienced a blackoutdefined as not being able to remember places that they went or things they did while drinking. Smaller studies by researchers at Duke University report that roughly 1 in 10 male and female college students and recent high-school graduates experienced at least 1 blackout in the 2 weeks before being surveyed.\n\nResearch suggests that there are several factors that can increase ones risk of blacking out, in particular drinking in ways that cause ones blood alcohol concentration (BAC) to rise quickly and reach a high level. The BAC rises quickly when lots of alcohol gets into the bloodstream at once. This could mean drinking on an empty stomach, doing shots, chugging alcoholic beverages, or all three. Being a female is also a risk factor for several reasons. Females are more likely to drink on an empty stomach than males, and they tend to drink beverages with higher concentrations of alcohol than beer, such as mixed drinks, shots, and wine. From a biological standpoint, they reach higher BACs than males after each drink as a result of differences in the amount of water in the body. In all cases, the best predictor that a drinker will black out is that they have blacked out before. Some people seem to be very susceptible to blackouts, whereas others are relatively resistant to the serious effects of alcohol on memory. Research with twins suggests that if one twin experiences blackouts the other is likely to experience them too, so it seems there is a genetic component to sensitivity to blackouts.\n\nBlackouts arent necessarily a sign of a problem with alcohol, but they are always a reason for concern and should prompt a person to consider their relationship with alcohol.\n\nFor more information, see NIAAAs fact sheet, Alcohol Overdose: The Dangers of Drinking Too Much. Available at: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AlcoholOverdoseFactsheet/Overdosefact.htm.","numcomments":0,"author":"Kandiyohi County Drug Free Communities Coalition","author_s":"http://kcdrugfree.areavoices.com/author/kcdfc/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-06-13T15:58:55Z","displaydate":"2014-06-13 15:58:55","displaymodified":"2014-06-13 15:58:55","categories":["Alcohol"],"spell":["Alcohol Blackouts vs. Passing Out","Shining a Light on Alcohol Blackouts\n\n\nBlackout – Amnesia for places a person went or things they did while intoxicated; can involve spotty memory (fragmentary blackout, brownout, or grayout) or large missing chunks of time (en bloc blackout).\n\nBlacking out vs. Passing out – Blacking out from alcohol implies that a person is awake and functioning but unable to create memories for events and actions. Passing out from alcohol implies a person is asleep or unconscious from drinking too much. The two states are quite different.\n\n\n\n\nWhat does it mean when someone says they were “blackout drunk?” How does a blackout differ from “passing out” after drinking, and what are the possible dangerous effects of drinking enough to blackout?\n\nBlackouts are periods of amnesia during which a person actively engages in behaviors like walking and talking but does not create memories for these events as they transpire. This results in missing periods of time in the person’s autobiographical record. Blacking out is quite different from passing out, which means either falling asleep from excessive drinking or literally drinking oneself unconscious.\n\nAll blackouts are not the same and are distinguished by the severity of the amnesia. The most common form of blackout involves spotty memories for events, with islands of memories separated by missing memories in between. This form often is referred to as a fragmentary blackout, a grayout, or a brownout. With this type of blackout, focusing on the islands of memories often helps cue recall for some, but not all, of the missing pieces. Full and complete amnesia often spanning hours  or more is known as an en bloc blackout. With this severe form of blackout, trying to fill in the missing pieces typically is fruitless. The memories were never formed and so no amount of digging will uncover them. They simply don’t exist.\n\nIt seems that alcohol produces blackouts by shutting down circuits that involve the hippocampus, a brain area which plays a central role in consolidating memories for what happens in our day-to-day lives. Information coming into the brain from the world around us is processed in various brain areas and then funneled to the hippocampus, which somehow weaves the information together into a running record of facts and events in our lives, a process called consolidation. By interfering with how these memory circuits work, alcohol creates a void in the record-keeping system.\n\nDuring a blackout, the ability to remember things that happened before the blackout typically is spared. Because of this, even in the midst of a blackout, a person can carry on conversations and even tell stories about events that happened years ago or earlier in the evening while they were intoxicated but not yet in the blackout. Outside observers typically are unaware that an individual is in a blackout. Depending on how much alcohol the person drank and how impaired other brain functions are, a person in the midst of a blackout could appear incredibly drunk—or not overly intoxicated at all.\n\nAnything a person can do while they are drunk and not blacked out they can do while they are blacked out—they just won’t remember it the next day. Depending on how impaired the brain regions involved in decisionmaking and impulse control are, the missing events could range from mundane behaviors, like brushing  teeth, to dangerous and traumatic events like driving a car, getting into a fight, or committing—or being the victim of— a sexual assault or other crime.\n\nBlackouts are surprisingly common, particularly among younger drinkers. Across four waves of the Harvard College Alcohol Study, which spanned the 1990s, roughly 1 in 4 male and female students each year experienced a blackout—defined as not being able to remember places that they went or things they did while drinking. Smaller studies by researchers at Duke University report that roughly 1 in 10 male and female college students and recent high-school graduates experienced at least 1 blackout in the 2 weeks before being surveyed.\n\nResearch suggests that there are several factors that can increase one’s risk of  blacking out, in particular drinking in  ways that cause one’s blood alcohol  concentration (BAC) to rise quickly  and reach a high level. The BAC rises  quickly when lots of alcohol gets into  the bloodstream at once. This could  mean drinking on an empty stomach,  doing shots, chugging alcoholic  beverages, or all three. Being a female  is also a risk factor for several reasons.  Females are more likely to drink on an empty stomach than males, and they tend to drink beverages with higher  concentrations of alcohol than beer,  such as mixed drinks, shots, and wine. From a biological standpoint, they reach higher BACs than males after each drink as a result of differences in the amount of water in the body. In all cases, the best predictor that a drinker will black out is that they have blacked out before. Some people seem to be very susceptible to blackouts, whereas others are relatively resistant to the serious effects of alcohol on memory. Research with twins suggests that if one twin experiences blackouts the other is likely to experience them too, so it seems there is a genetic component to sensitivity to blackouts.\n\nBlackouts aren’t necessarily a sign of a problem with alcohol, but they are always a reason for concern and should prompt a person to consider their relationship with alcohol.\n\nFor more information, see NIAAA’s fact sheet, “Alcohol Overdose: The Dangers of Drinking Too Much.” Available at: http://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/AlcoholOverdoseFactsheet/Overdosefact.htm.","Kandiyohi County Drug Free Communities Coalition"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:healthoutloud.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":63,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"healthoutloud.areavoices.com/1360","permalink":"http://healthoutloud.areavoices.com/2014/02/10/drinking-coffee-could-save-your-life/","blogid":"5405","blogdomain":"healthoutloud.areavoices.com","hostname":"healthoutloud.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Drinking Coffee Could Save Your Life","content":"More than half of American adults drink coffee every day. According to the latest research, two cups of coffee a day may actually save your life.\n\nResults from a 2013 study performed by the Harvard School of Public Health, finds that coffee fanatics who drink two to four cups of coffee each day are less likely to commit suicide than those who drink decaf, or no coffee at all. The study followed over 200,000 people for at least 16 years. The researchers found that the suicide risk was cut by around 50 percent for coffee drinkers.\n\nThe results add to the growing number of studies on coffee’s potential health benefits. Previous research shows that coffee drinkers have lower risks of diabetes, cancer, heart disease and gallstones. Researchers have also discovered that coffee and smiles might go hand-in-hand by reducing the risk of depression. Caffeine from a cup of Joe not only stimulates the central nervous system but may act as a mild antidepressant by boosting production of happy hormones like serotonin and dopamine.\n\nIn spite of the recent research findings, the authors do not recommend that depressed adults increase caffeine consumption. “Overall, our results suggest that there is little further benefit for consumption above two to three cups/day or 400 mg of caffeine/day,” the authors wrote.\n\nLikewise, there’s plenty of research out there reporting on coffee’s well-known negative effects. Caffeine is a drug. While low to moderate doses are generally safe, caffeine is addictive and users can become dependent on it and find it difficult to quit or even cut back. Other negative side-effects coffee drinkers may experience include insomnia, disturbed sleep cycles and consumption of more daily calories.\n\nRegardless, we’ll raise our mugs to this most recent study for giving us one more validation for grabbing another cup of our favorite java.","rawcontent":"More than half of American adults drink coffee every day. According to the latest research, two cups of coffee a day may actually save your life.\n\nResults from a 2013 study performed by the Harvard School of Public Health, finds that coffee fanatics who drink two to four cups of coffee each day are less likely to commit suicide than those who drink decaf, or no coffee at all. The study followed over 200,000 people for at least 16 years. The researchers found that the suicide risk was cut by around 50 percent for coffee drinkers.\n\nThe results add to the growing number of studies on coffees potential health benefits. Previous research shows that coffee drinkers have lower risks of diabetes, cancer, heart disease and gallstones. Researchers have also discovered that coffee and smiles might go hand-in-hand by reducing the risk of depression. Caffeine from a cup of Joe not only stimulates the central nervous system but may act as a mild antidepressant by boosting production of happy hormones like serotonin and dopamine.\n\nIn spite of the recent research findings, the authors do not recommend that depressed adults increase caffeine consumption. Overall, our results suggest that there is little further benefit for consumption above two to three cups/day or 400 mg of caffeine/day, the authors wrote.\n\nLikewise, theres plenty of research out there reporting on coffees well-known negative effects. Caffeine is a drug. While low to moderate doses are generally safe, caffeine is addictive and users can become dependent on it and find it difficult to quit or even cut back. Other negative side-effects coffee drinkers may experience include insomnia, disturbed sleep cycles and consumption of more daily calories.\n\nRegardless, well raise our mugs to this most recent study for giving us one more validation for grabbing another cup of our favorite java.","contentnoshortcodes":"More than half of American adults drink coffee every day. According to the latest research, two cups of coffee a day may actually save your life.\n\nResults from a 2013 study performed by the Harvard School of Public Health, finds that coffee fanatics who drink two to four cups of coffee each day are less likely to commit suicide than those who drink decaf, or no coffee at all. The study followed over 200,000 people for at least 16 years. The researchers found that the suicide risk was cut by around 50 percent for coffee drinkers.\n\nThe results add to the growing number of studies on coffees potential health benefits. Previous research shows that coffee drinkers have lower risks of diabetes, cancer, heart disease and gallstones. Researchers have also discovered that coffee and smiles might go hand-in-hand by reducing the risk of depression. Caffeine from a cup of Joe not only stimulates the central nervous system but may act as a mild antidepressant by boosting production of happy hormones like serotonin and dopamine.\n\nIn spite of the recent research findings, the authors do not recommend that depressed adults increase caffeine consumption. Overall, our results suggest that there is little further benefit for consumption above two to three cups/day or 400 mg of caffeine/day, the authors wrote.\n\nLikewise, theres plenty of research out there reporting on coffees well-known negative effects. Caffeine is a drug. While low to moderate doses are generally safe, caffeine is addictive and users can become dependent on it and find it difficult to quit or even cut back. Other negative side-effects coffee drinkers may experience include insomnia, disturbed sleep cycles and consumption of more daily calories.\n\nRegardless, well raise our mugs to this most recent study for giving us one more validation for grabbing another cup of our favorite java.","numcomments":0,"author":"Crystal Hoepner","author_s":"http://healthoutloud.areavoices.com/author/choepner/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-02-10T18:21:28Z","displaydate":"2014-02-10 18:21:28","displaymodified":"2014-02-10 18:21:28","tags":["alexandria","Coffee","Crystal Hoepner","minnesota","Public Health","Suicide"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Drinking Coffee Could Save Your Life","More than half of American adults drink coffee every day. According to the latest research, two cups of coffee a day may actually save your life.\n\nResults from a 2013 study performed by the Harvard School of Public Health, finds that coffee fanatics who drink two to four cups of coffee each day are less likely to commit suicide than those who drink decaf, or no coffee at all. The study followed over 200,000 people for at least 16 years. The researchers found that the suicide risk was cut by around 50 percent for coffee drinkers.\n\nThe results add to the growing number of studies on coffee’s potential health benefits. Previous research shows that coffee drinkers have lower risks of diabetes, cancer, heart disease and gallstones. Researchers have also discovered that coffee and smiles might go hand-in-hand by reducing the risk of depression. Caffeine from a cup of Joe not only stimulates the central nervous system but may act as a mild antidepressant by boosting production of happy hormones like serotonin and dopamine.\n\nIn spite of the recent research findings, the authors do not recommend that depressed adults increase caffeine consumption. “Overall, our results suggest that there is little further benefit for consumption above two to three cups/day or 400 mg of caffeine/day,” the authors wrote.\n\nLikewise, there’s plenty of research out there reporting on coffee’s well-known negative effects. Caffeine is a drug. While low to moderate doses are generally safe, caffeine is addictive and users can become dependent on it and find it difficult to quit or even cut back. Other negative side-effects coffee drinkers may experience include insomnia, disturbed sleep cycles and consumption of more daily calories.\n\nRegardless, we’ll raise our mugs to this most recent study for giving us one more validation for grabbing another cup of our favorite java.","Crystal Hoepner"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:middleminnesota.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":208,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"middleminnesota.areavoices.com/1587","permalink":"http://middleminnesota.areavoices.com/2014/07/20/outstate-news-7-20-14/","blogid":"2292","blogdomain":"middleminnesota.areavoices.com","hostname":"middleminnesota.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Outstate News (7-20-14)","content":"Mary Ellen Otremba, long-time legislator, passes away. (Alexandria)\n\nMinnesota Chamber of Commerce director [David Olson] dies. (Albert Lea)\n\nGarofalo/Radinovich/Thissen: Farmington leaders offer to host special legislative session. (ForumNews)\n\nMarquart/Torkelson: Minnesota farmland taxes expected to rise. (ForumNews)\n\nIngebrigtsen/Moran: The DFL just came really close to putting legal pot on its list of priorities. (CityPages)\n\nJohnson/Downey/et al: Turmoil in GOP Reaches Boiling Point. (PoliticsMn)\n\nJohnson/Kuisle/Zellers/et al: Does Minnesota Republican frac sand fight reflect Kurt Zellers' rainmakers? (BSP)\n\nMNGOP stands by Supreme Court candidate Michelle MacDonald in ultra-bizarre email. (CityPages)\n\nEden Prairie GOP candidate Sheila Kihne once wrote cringe-worthy book about dating. (CityPages)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: GOP hopefuls differ on how to rein in state budget. (Marshall)\n\nJohnson/Zellers/Seifert: Burned before, GOP governor hopefuls quiet on abortion, gay marriage. (MPR)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: Republican candidates for governor want to change MNsure. (MPR)\n\nJohnson aiming for November. (Red Wing)\n\nRepublican governor candidate Honour visits Rochester. (Rochester)\n\nSeifert calls for health-care reform in Rochester visit. (Rochester)\n\nJeff Johnson's campaign defends criticized Facebook Q&A. (CityPages)\n\nAbeler: Rivals sow doubt about McFadden as GOP senate primary nears. (MPR-St. Cloud)\n\nFranken/Nolan/Kline/Peterson/et al: Capitol Chatter: U.S. House races bring in money, too. (ForumNews)\n\nCongressional fundraising: Franken raises and spends a lot, Mills self-funds, Peterson posts a big quarter. (MinnPost)\n\nFundraising gap between Peterson, Westrom narrows. (Alexandria)\n\nFranken: Troops, families gather in Minneapolis to reconnect. (Strib)\n\nSen. Franken Urges Minnesotans to Comment on Net Neutrality. (WDIO)\n\nDuluth, Range airports vie for Oberstar name. (MnBrown)\n\nDayton: State should stop using coal. (AP)\n\nJesson: State Medicaid changes save $10.5M. (AP)\n\nState adds 8,500 jobs: Unemployment down to 4.5% (McClatchy)\n\n2008 Legacy amendment offers buffet of outdoors, arts funds. (ForumNews)\n\nLegacy funds don’t pay for projects alone. (ForumNews)\n\nDNR: Invasive carp found in Mississippi River. (AP)\n\nPeterson/Paap: Farmers fume over proposed EPA wetlands rule change. (MPR)\n\nUSDA federal order requires PEDv reporting. (Hutchinson)\n\nFarmers look to salvage crops after spring soaking. (Litchfield)\n\nOfficials at Minn. meeting say farmers need to manage water before government steps in. (AgWeek)\n\nCommercial dog and cat breeders to be regulated. (HTF)\n\nLetter: Ward supports young people. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Questions for Ward. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Savick proved her mettle in St. Paul. (Albert Lea)\n\nLetter: Kresha is a leader for District 9B. (Little Falls)\n\nLetter: Thanks to Stumpf for his work that will benefit rural Minn. roads. (Crookston)\n\nDavids Column (Dayton): MNsure report ignores key facts. (Worthington)\n\nPeterson-Vilsack Column: Renewing the commitment to conservation. (AgWeek)\n\nColumn: Price of government to hit all time low. (Detroit Lakes)\n\nEditorial (Martin-Housley): PolyMet ‘just popped out’ for DFL release? (Virginia)\n\nEditorial: Ready to vote in your pajamas? (Mankato-Albert Lea)\n\nEditorial: It’s time to discuss voting changes. (Austin)\n\nEditorial: Vote early and be counted. (Hutchinson)\n\nEditorial: State is right to get tough on farms’ nitrogen use. (St. Cloud)\n\nEditorial: Tell FCC to keep Web access equal for all. (St. Cloud)","rawcontent":"Mary Ellen Otremba, long-time legislator, passes away. (Alexandria)\n\nMinnesota Chamber of Commerce director [David Olson] dies. (Albert Lea)\n\nGarofalo/Radinovich/Thissen: Farmington leaders offer to host special legislative session. (ForumNews)\n\nMarquart/Torkelson: Minnesota farmland taxes expected to rise. (ForumNews)\n\nIngebrigtsen/Moran: The DFL just came really close to putting legal pot on its list of priorities. (CityPages)\n\nJohnson/Downey/et al: Turmoil in GOP Reaches Boiling Point. (PoliticsMn)\n\nJohnson/Kuisle/Zellers/et al: Does Minnesota Republican frac sand fight reflect Kurt Zellers' rainmakers? (BSP)\n\nMNGOP stands by Supreme Court candidate Michelle MacDonald in ultra-bizarre email. (CityPages)\n\nEden Prairie GOP candidate Sheila Kihne once wrote cringe-worthy book about dating. (CityPages)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: GOP hopefuls differ on how to rein in state budget. (Marshall)\n\nJohnson/Zellers/Seifert: Burned before, GOP governor hopefuls quiet on abortion, gay marriage. (MPR)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: Republican candidates for governor want to change MNsure. (MPR)\n\nJohnson aiming for November. (Red Wing)\n\nRepublican governor candidate Honour visits Rochester. (Rochester)\n\nSeifert calls for health-care reform in Rochester visit. (Rochester)\n\nJeff Johnson's campaign defends criticized Facebook Q&A. (CityPages)\n\nAbeler: Rivals sow doubt about McFadden as GOP senate primary nears. (MPR-St. Cloud)\n\nFranken/Nolan/Kline/Peterson/et al: Capitol Chatter: U.S. House races bring in money, too. (ForumNews)\n\nCongressional fundraising: Franken raises and spends a lot, Mills self-funds, Peterson posts a big quarter. (MinnPost)\n\nFundraising gap between Peterson, Westrom narrows. (Alexandria)\n\nFranken: Troops, families gather in Minneapolis to reconnect. (Strib)\n\nSen. Franken Urges Minnesotans to Comment on Net Neutrality. (WDIO)\n\nDuluth, Range airports vie for Oberstar name. (MnBrown)\n\nDayton: State should stop using coal. (AP)\n\nJesson: State Medicaid changes save $10.5M. (AP)\n\nState adds 8,500 jobs: Unemployment down to 4.5% (McClatchy)\n\n2008 Legacy amendment offers buffet of outdoors, arts funds. (ForumNews)\n\nLegacy funds dont pay for projects alone. (ForumNews)\n\nDNR: Invasive carp found in Mississippi River. (AP)\n\nPeterson/Paap: Farmers fume over proposed EPA wetlands rule change. (MPR)\n\nUSDA federal order requires PEDv reporting. (Hutchinson)\n\nFarmers look to salvage crops after spring soaking. (Litchfield)\n\nOfficials at Minn. meeting say farmers need to manage water before government steps in. (AgWeek)\n\nCommercial dog and cat breeders to be regulated. (HTF)\n\nLetter: Ward supports young people. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Questions for Ward. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Savick proved her mettle in St. Paul. (Albert Lea)\n\nLetter: Kresha is a leader for District 9B. (Little Falls)\n\nLetter: Thanks to Stumpf for his work that will benefit rural Minn. roads. (Crookston)\n\nDavids Column (Dayton): MNsure report ignores key facts. (Worthington)\n\nPeterson-Vilsack Column: Renewing the commitment to conservation. (AgWeek)\n\nColumn: Price of government to hit all time low. (Detroit Lakes)\n\nEditorial (Martin-Housley): PolyMet just popped out for DFL release? (Virginia)\n\nEditorial: Ready to vote in your pajamas? (Mankato-Albert Lea)\n\nEditorial: Its time to discuss voting changes. (Austin)\n\nEditorial: Vote early and be counted. (Hutchinson)\n\nEditorial: State is right to get tough on farms nitrogen use. (St. Cloud)\n\nEditorial: Tell FCC to keep Web access equal for all. (St. Cloud)","contentnoshortcodes":"Mary Ellen Otremba, long-time legislator, passes away. (Alexandria)\n\nMinnesota Chamber of Commerce director [David Olson] dies. (Albert Lea)\n\nGarofalo/Radinovich/Thissen: Farmington leaders offer to host special legislative session. (ForumNews)\n\nMarquart/Torkelson: Minnesota farmland taxes expected to rise. (ForumNews)\n\nIngebrigtsen/Moran: The DFL just came really close to putting legal pot on its list of priorities. (CityPages)\n\nJohnson/Downey/et al: Turmoil in GOP Reaches Boiling Point. (PoliticsMn)\n\nJohnson/Kuisle/Zellers/et al: Does Minnesota Republican frac sand fight reflect Kurt Zellers' rainmakers? (BSP)\n\nMNGOP stands by Supreme Court candidate Michelle MacDonald in ultra-bizarre email. (CityPages)\n\nEden Prairie GOP candidate Sheila Kihne once wrote cringe-worthy book about dating. (CityPages)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: GOP hopefuls differ on how to rein in state budget. (Marshall)\n\nJohnson/Zellers/Seifert: Burned before, GOP governor hopefuls quiet on abortion, gay marriage. (MPR)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: Republican candidates for governor want to change MNsure. (MPR)\n\nJohnson aiming for November. (Red Wing)\n\nRepublican governor candidate Honour visits Rochester. (Rochester)\n\nSeifert calls for health-care reform in Rochester visit. (Rochester)\n\nJeff Johnson's campaign defends criticized Facebook Q&A. (CityPages)\n\nAbeler: Rivals sow doubt about McFadden as GOP senate primary nears. (MPR-St. Cloud)\n\nFranken/Nolan/Kline/Peterson/et al: Capitol Chatter: U.S. House races bring in money, too. (ForumNews)\n\nCongressional fundraising: Franken raises and spends a lot, Mills self-funds, Peterson posts a big quarter. (MinnPost)\n\nFundraising gap between Peterson, Westrom narrows. (Alexandria)\n\nFranken: Troops, families gather in Minneapolis to reconnect. (Strib)\n\nSen. Franken Urges Minnesotans to Comment on Net Neutrality. (WDIO)\n\nDuluth, Range airports vie for Oberstar name. (MnBrown)\n\nDayton: State should stop using coal. (AP)\n\nJesson: State Medicaid changes save $10.5M. (AP)\n\nState adds 8,500 jobs: Unemployment down to 4.5% (McClatchy)\n\n2008 Legacy amendment offers buffet of outdoors, arts funds. (ForumNews)\n\nLegacy funds dont pay for projects alone. (ForumNews)\n\nDNR: Invasive carp found in Mississippi River. (AP)\n\nPeterson/Paap: Farmers fume over proposed EPA wetlands rule change. (MPR)\n\nUSDA federal order requires PEDv reporting. (Hutchinson)\n\nFarmers look to salvage crops after spring soaking. (Litchfield)\n\nOfficials at Minn. meeting say farmers need to manage water before government steps in. (AgWeek)\n\nCommercial dog and cat breeders to be regulated. (HTF)\n\nLetter: Ward supports young people. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Questions for Ward. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Savick proved her mettle in St. Paul. (Albert Lea)\n\nLetter: Kresha is a leader for District 9B. (Little Falls)\n\nLetter: Thanks to Stumpf for his work that will benefit rural Minn. roads. (Crookston)\n\nDavids Column (Dayton): MNsure report ignores key facts. (Worthington)\n\nPeterson-Vilsack Column: Renewing the commitment to conservation. (AgWeek)\n\nColumn: Price of government to hit all time low. (Detroit Lakes)\n\nEditorial (Martin-Housley): PolyMet just popped out for DFL release? (Virginia)\n\nEditorial: Ready to vote in your pajamas? (Mankato-Albert Lea)\n\nEditorial: Its time to discuss voting changes. (Austin)\n\nEditorial: Vote early and be counted. (Hutchinson)\n\nEditorial: State is right to get tough on farms nitrogen use. (St. Cloud)\n\nEditorial: Tell FCC to keep Web access equal for all. (St. Cloud)","numcomments":0,"author":"Al Juhnke","author_s":"http://middleminnesota.areavoices.com/author/ajuhnke/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-20T19:49:42Z","displaydate":"2014-07-20 19:49:42","displaymodified":"2014-07-20 19:49:42","categories":["Outstate News"],"spell":["Outstate News (7-20-14)","Mary Ellen Otremba, long-time legislator, passes away. (Alexandria)\n\nMinnesota Chamber of Commerce director [David Olson] dies. (Albert Lea)\n\nGarofalo/Radinovich/Thissen: Farmington leaders offer to host special legislative session. (ForumNews)\n\nMarquart/Torkelson: Minnesota farmland taxes expected to rise. (ForumNews)\n\nIngebrigtsen/Moran: The DFL just came really close to putting legal pot on its list of priorities. (CityPages)\n\nJohnson/Downey/et al: Turmoil in GOP Reaches Boiling Point. (PoliticsMn)\n\nJohnson/Kuisle/Zellers/et al: Does Minnesota Republican frac sand fight reflect Kurt Zellers' rainmakers? (BSP)\n\nMNGOP stands by Supreme Court candidate Michelle MacDonald in ultra-bizarre email. (CityPages)\n\nEden Prairie GOP candidate Sheila Kihne once wrote cringe-worthy book about dating. (CityPages)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: GOP hopefuls differ on how to rein in state budget. (Marshall)\n\nJohnson/Zellers/Seifert: Burned before, GOP governor hopefuls quiet on abortion, gay marriage. (MPR)\n\nZellers/Johnson/Seifert: Republican candidates for governor want to change MNsure. (MPR)\n\nJohnson aiming for November. (Red Wing)\n\nRepublican governor candidate Honour visits Rochester. (Rochester)\n\nSeifert calls for health-care reform in Rochester visit. (Rochester)\n\nJeff Johnson's campaign defends criticized Facebook Q&A. (CityPages)\n\nAbeler: Rivals sow doubt about McFadden as GOP senate primary nears. (MPR-St. Cloud)\n\nFranken/Nolan/Kline/Peterson/et al: Capitol Chatter: U.S. House races bring in money, too. (ForumNews)\n\nCongressional fundraising: Franken raises and spends a lot, Mills self-funds, Peterson posts a big quarter. (MinnPost)\n\nFundraising gap between Peterson, Westrom narrows. (Alexandria)\n\nFranken: Troops, families gather in Minneapolis to reconnect. (Strib)\n\nSen. Franken Urges Minnesotans to Comment on Net Neutrality. (WDIO)\n\nDuluth, Range airports vie for Oberstar name. (MnBrown)\n\nDayton: State should stop using coal. (AP)\n\nJesson: State Medicaid changes save $10.5M. (AP)\n\nState adds 8,500 jobs: Unemployment down to 4.5% (McClatchy)\n\n2008 Legacy amendment offers buffet of outdoors, arts funds. (ForumNews)\n\nLegacy funds don’t pay for projects alone. (ForumNews)\n\nDNR: Invasive carp found in Mississippi River. (AP)\n\nPeterson/Paap: Farmers fume over proposed EPA wetlands rule change. (MPR)\n\nUSDA federal order requires PEDv reporting. (Hutchinson)\n\nFarmers look to salvage crops after spring soaking. (Litchfield)\n\nOfficials at Minn. meeting say farmers need to manage water before government steps in. (AgWeek)\n\nCommercial dog and cat breeders to be regulated. (HTF)\n\nLetter: Ward supports young people. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Questions for Ward. (Brainerd)\n\nLetter: Savick proved her mettle in St. Paul. (Albert Lea)\n\nLetter: Kresha is a leader for District 9B. (Little Falls)\n\nLetter: Thanks to Stumpf for his work that will benefit rural Minn. roads. (Crookston)\n\nDavids Column (Dayton): MNsure report ignores key facts. (Worthington)\n\nPeterson-Vilsack Column: Renewing the commitment to conservation. (AgWeek)\n\nColumn: Price of government to hit all time low. (Detroit Lakes)\n\nEditorial (Martin-Housley): PolyMet ‘just popped out’ for DFL release? (Virginia)\n\nEditorial: Ready to vote in your pajamas? (Mankato-Albert Lea)\n\nEditorial: It’s time to discuss voting changes. (Austin)\n\nEditorial: Vote early and be counted. (Hutchinson)\n\nEditorial: State is right to get tough on farms’ nitrogen use. (St. Cloud)\n\nEditorial: Tell FCC to keep Web access equal for all. (St. Cloud)","Al Juhnke"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:mssimplicity.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":370,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"mssimplicity.areavoices.com/1560","permalink":"http://mssimplicity.areavoices.com/2014/07/22/dorm-room-packing-essentials/","blogid":"5020","blogdomain":"mssimplicity.areavoices.com","hostname":"mssimplicity.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Dorm Room Packing Essentials","content":"\n\n\n\n \n\nI have reached that time that another child is about to leave the nest. This child going is much harder than the previous one....because I know how I will feel afterward. With my oldest I was excited and told by a friend to only cry tears of pride and joy. And I did. But then a few weeks went by and family mealtime and so many other things were different. He was a good eater and I could experiment with food and he ate it. His brothers didn't eat my grand meals and it was no longer fun to cook dinner. Our family had changed forever.\n\nNow another is going to fly away. And I am counting down the days and I am sad. Our family is again going to be changed forever. Our family was changed forever each time we had one of our sons. When we welcome a new baby into our home it was a joyous occasion. We were adding, now we are subtracting.\n\nBut I will put a brave face on and make sure that when he leaves he will have everything he will need to have an organized dorm room. I can control that. I can't control how I will feel. So as someone who enjoys control I will focus on what I know I can do. I can make a list. I can buy stuff. I can make organizing decisions. My friend Geralin Thomas of Metropolitan Organizing, LLC has created a fantastic checklist that we will print off and take with us. I will put this checklist on a clipboard and get to work!\n\nHere is a look at what we have started to accumulate in the last few weeks. We have a box of stuff that I am placing things in as I buy what is on the checklist.\n\n \n\n1. A good area rug. This is often overlooked but dorm floors are often industrial and they need a soft place to land when they hop out of their lofted beds.\n\n \n\n2. Bedding. I have all boys...they don't need anything special. My mom made each of my boys a quilt when they graduated {that is special} a pillow a set of sheets and a mattress pad. My son is getting the sheets from his older brother as he has moved out of the dorm and no longer is in a twin bed. We have an extra twin mattress pad, so done with that category! Sometimes you need twin long sheets, so make sure. If you have a daughter, you have my prayers. They will be coordinating with their roommate and they will plan on having it look like a dorm good enough for HGTV.\n\n \n\n3. Bath items. A few large towels, wash cloths and a shower caddy as well as flip flops. I think a robe is optional as I bought large towels. When deciding on a robe I think it all depends on the length of the walk from the shower to the room and if they are a boy or a girl. When I graduated my mom bought me several sets of brown towels as a graduation gift. It was the worst gift a girl could get. I wanted pink. She gave me practical. I bought my son green that resemble brown. I am my mother!\n\n \n\n4. Electronics. Roommates usually try to coordinate who will bring the TV and gaming systems if you have boys. I have an odd child that does not watch TV but listens to podcasts. He also doesn't play many video games. I know this is a rarity so plan accordingly. We found my oldest had a laptop when he left for college but by his second year he wanted a Surface. A Surface is more portable and easier to take notes on in class. So we will probably skip the laptop purchase with this child.\n\n \n\n5. Hooks. Take advantage of that vertical space. We should have bought stock in 3M as these hooks are genius. My best tip is to put one by the door to hang the keys. They can be used to hang cords from the walls and along beds. Buy a bunch in different styles as you will thank me later. I also send along an over the door hook to hang up towels and jackets.\n\n \n\n6. Desk organizers. They are usually given desks and are expected to study there. They never do. I think desks should leave dorm rooms. Most people gather in common areas to get their homework done. But if you have a desk look at ways to make good use of the space. Pencils and pens are sometimes still used, so best to find a way to store a few. For my oldest it was highlighters that he used most as everything is typed. Make sure that you frame a picture of yourself and place it on their desk so they don't forget what you look like!\n\n \n\n7. Extra storage. Think TV stands and microwave carts. There is often storage here that should be maximized. When out shopping for one, look for drawers and good use of space. Don't just buy it because it looks nice, think practical.  They even make futons with drawers underneath for storage.\n\n \n\n8. Closet storage. I am not a fan of the slim hangers as I think it encourages people to buy more clothes because they have more room. But in the case of a dorm room closet I encourage these hangers. I have purchased two boxes as this son of mine likes clothes. I also have hanging files made for closets with storage in them as well. He can roll of sweaters and pants and place in the pockets. We are all about maximizing that small space. I have locker baskets as well as a set of black quilted boxes with lids for storing items like socks and underwear that can stack.\n\n \n\nJust remember one thing, you have been preparing for this transition for 18 years. They are smart and wise young adults who know how to figure things out. We have been silently showing them how to do things like an adult. They know how to trouble shoot something that is broken by watching a YouTube video. Remember it doesn't have to be perfect. You don't have to have everything on move in day. Whatever you forget they will call you and ask for you to mail it or money to buy it. So forget a few things so that you are guaranteed a call home!\n\n \n\nTo Joyful, Organized Simplicity,\n\n \n\nMS. Simplicity","rawcontent":"\n\n\n\n \n\nI have reached that time that another child is about to leave the nest. This child going is much harder than the previous one....because I know how I will feel afterward. With my oldest I was excited and told by a friend to only cry tears of pride and joy. And I did. But then a few weeks went by and family mealtime and so many other things weredifferent. He was a good eater and I could experiment with food and he ate it. His brothers didn't eatmy grand mealsand it was no longer fun to cook dinner. Our family had changed forever.\n\nNow another is going to fly away. And I am counting down the days and I am sad. Our family is again going to be changed forever. Our family was changed forever each time we had one of our sons. When we welcome a new baby into our home it was a joyous occasion. We were adding, now we are subtracting.\n\nBut I will put a brave face on and make sure that when he leaves he will have everything he will need to have an organized dorm room. I can control that. I can't control how I will feel. So as someone who enjoys control I will focus on what I know I can do. I can make a list. I can buy stuff. I can make organizing decisions. My friend Geralin Thomas of Metropolitan Organizing, LLC has created a fantastic checklist that we will print off and take with us. I will put this checklist on a clipboard and get to work!\n\nHere is a look at what we have started to accumulate in the last few weeks. We have a box of stuff that I am placing things in as I buy what is on the checklist.\n\n \n\n1. A good area rug. This is often overlooked but dorm floors are often industrial and they need a soft place to land when they hop out of their lofted beds.\n\n \n\n2. Bedding. I have all boys...they don't need anything special. My mom made each of my boys a quilt when they graduated {that is special} a pillow a set of sheets and a mattress pad. My son is getting the sheets from his older brother as he has moved out of the dorm and no longer is in a twin bed. We have an extra twin mattresspad, so done with thatcategory!Sometimes you need twin long sheets, so make sure. If you have a daughter, you have my prayers. They will becoordinating withtheir roommate and theywill plan on having it look likea dorm good enough for HGTV.\n\n \n\n3. Bath items. A few large towels, wash cloths and a shower caddy as well as flip flops. I think a robe is optional as I bought large towels.When deciding on a robe Ithink it all depends on the length of the walk from the shower to the room and if they are a boy or a girl. When I graduated my mom bought meseveral sets of brown towels as a graduation gift. It was the worst gift a girl could get. I wanted pink. She gave me practical. I bought my son green that resemble brown. I am my mother!\n\n \n\n4. Electronics. Roommates usually try to coordinate who will bring the TV and gaming systems if you have boys. I have an odd child that does not watch TV but listens to podcasts. He also doesn't play many video games. I know this is a rarity so plan accordingly. We found my oldest had a laptop when he left for college but by his second year he wanted a Surface. A Surface is more portable and easier to take notes on in class. So we will probably skip the laptop purchase with this child.\n\n \n\n5. Hooks. Take advantage of that vertical space. We should have bought stock in 3M as these hooks are genius.My best tip is toput one by the door to hang the keys. They can be used to hang cords from the walls and along beds. Buy a bunch in different stylesas you will thank me later. I also send along an over the door hook to hang up towels and jackets.\n\n \n\n6. Desk organizers. They are usually given desks and are expected to study there. They never do. I think desks should leave dorm rooms. Most people gather in common areas to get their homework done. But if you have a desk look at ways to make good use of the space. Pencils and pens are sometimes still used, so best to find a way to store a few. For my oldest it was highlighters that he used most as everything is typed. Make sure that you frame a picture of yourself and place it on their desk so they don't forget what you look like!\n\n \n\n7. Extra storage.ThinkTV stands and microwave carts. There is often storage here thatshould be maximized. Whenout shopping for one, look for drawers and gooduse of space. Don't just buy it because it looks nice, think practical. They even make futons with drawers underneath for storage.\n\n \n\n8. Closet storage. I am not a fan of the slim hangers as I think it encourages people to buy more clothes because they have more room. But in the case of a dorm room closet I encourage these hangers. I have purchased two boxes as this son of mine likes clothes. I also have hangingfiles made for closetswith storage in them as well. He can roll of sweaters and pants and place in the pockets. We are all about maximizing that small space. I have locker baskets as well as a set of black quilted boxes with lids for storing items like socks and underwearthat can stack.\n\n \n\nJust remember one thing, you have been preparing for this transition for 18 years. They are smart and wise young adults who know how to figure things out. We have been silently showing them how to do things like an adult. They know how to trouble shoot something that is broken by watching a YouTube video. Remember it doesn't have to be perfect. You don't have to have everything on move in day. Whatever you forget they will call you and ask for you to mail it or money to buy it. So forget a few things so that you are guaranteed a call home!\n\n \n\nTo Joyful, Organized Simplicity,\n\n \n\nMS. Simplicity","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\n\n\n \n\nI have reached that time that another child is about to leave the nest. This child going is much harder than the previous one....because I know how I will feel afterward. With my oldest I was excited and told by a friend to only cry tears of pride and joy. And I did. But then a few weeks went by and family mealtime and so many other things weredifferent. He was a good eater and I could experiment with food and he ate it. His brothers didn't eatmy grand mealsand it was no longer fun to cook dinner. Our family had changed forever.\n\nNow another is going to fly away. And I am counting down the days and I am sad. Our family is again going to be changed forever. Our family was changed forever each time we had one of our sons. When we welcome a new baby into our home it was a joyous occasion. We were adding, now we are subtracting.\n\nBut I will put a brave face on and make sure that when he leaves he will have everything he will need to have an organized dorm room. I can control that. I can't control how I will feel. So as someone who enjoys control I will focus on what I know I can do. I can make a list. I can buy stuff. I can make organizing decisions. My friend Geralin Thomas of Metropolitan Organizing, LLC has created a fantastic checklist that we will print off and take with us. I will put this checklist on a clipboard and get to work!\n\nHere is a look at what we have started to accumulate in the last few weeks. We have a box of stuff that I am placing things in as I buy what is on the checklist.\n\n \n\n1. A good area rug. This is often overlooked but dorm floors are often industrial and they need a soft place to land when they hop out of their lofted beds.\n\n \n\n2. Bedding. I have all boys...they don't need anything special. My mom made each of my boys a quilt when they graduated {that is special} a pillow a set of sheets and a mattress pad. My son is getting the sheets from his older brother as he has moved out of the dorm and no longer is in a twin bed. We have an extra twin mattresspad, so done with thatcategory!Sometimes you need twin long sheets, so make sure. If you have a daughter, you have my prayers. They will becoordinating withtheir roommate and theywill plan on having it look likea dorm good enough for HGTV.\n\n \n\n3. Bath items. A few large towels, wash cloths and a shower caddy as well as flip flops. I think a robe is optional as I bought large towels.When deciding on a robe Ithink it all depends on the length of the walk from the shower to the room and if they are a boy or a girl. When I graduated my mom bought meseveral sets of brown towels as a graduation gift. It was the worst gift a girl could get. I wanted pink. She gave me practical. I bought my son green that resemble brown. I am my mother!\n\n \n\n4. Electronics. Roommates usually try to coordinate who will bring the TV and gaming systems if you have boys. I have an odd child that does not watch TV but listens to podcasts. He also doesn't play many video games. I know this is a rarity so plan accordingly. We found my oldest had a laptop when he left for college but by his second year he wanted a Surface. A Surface is more portable and easier to take notes on in class. So we will probably skip the laptop purchase with this child.\n\n \n\n5. Hooks. Take advantage of that vertical space. We should have bought stock in 3M as these hooks are genius.My best tip is toput one by the door to hang the keys. They can be used to hang cords from the walls and along beds. Buy a bunch in different stylesas you will thank me later. I also send along an over the door hook to hang up towels and jackets.\n\n \n\n6. Desk organizers. They are usually given desks and are expected to study there. They never do. I think desks should leave dorm rooms. Most people gather in common areas to get their homework done. But if you have a desk look at ways to make good use of the space. Pencils and pens are sometimes still used, so best to find a way to store a few. For my oldest it was highlighters that he used most as everything is typed. Make sure that you frame a picture of yourself and place it on their desk so they don't forget what you look like!\n\n \n\n7. Extra storage.ThinkTV stands and microwave carts. There is often storage here thatshould be maximized. Whenout shopping for one, look for drawers and gooduse of space. Don't just buy it because it looks nice, think practical. They even make futons with drawers underneath for storage.\n\n \n\n8. Closet storage. I am not a fan of the slim hangers as I think it encourages people to buy more clothes because they have more room. But in the case of a dorm room closet I encourage these hangers. I have purchased two boxes as this son of mine likes clothes. I also have hangingfiles made for closetswith storage in them as well. He can roll of sweaters and pants and place in the pockets. We are all about maximizing that small space. I have locker baskets as well as a set of black quilted boxes with lids for storing items like socks and underwearthat can stack.\n\n \n\nJust remember one thing, you have been preparing for this transition for 18 years. They are smart and wise young adults who know how to figure things out. We have been silently showing them how to do things like an adult. They know how to trouble shoot something that is broken by watching a YouTube video. Remember it doesn't have to be perfect. You don't have to have everything on move in day. Whatever you forget they will call you and ask for you to mail it or money to buy it. So forget a few things so that you are guaranteed a call home!\n\n \n\nTo Joyful, Organized Simplicity,\n\n \n\nMS. Simplicity","numcomments":0,"author":"Melissa Schmalenberger","author_s":"http://mssimplicity.areavoices.com/author/mssimplicity/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-22T17:29:32Z","displaydate":"2014-07-22 17:29:32","displaymodified":"2014-07-22 17:29:32","tags":["college","dorm","MS. Simplicity","organizing"],"categories":["Family","Moms"],"spell":["Dorm Room Packing Essentials","\n\n\n\n \n\nI have reached that time that another child is about to leave the nest. This child going is much harder than the previous one....because I know how I will feel afterward. With my oldest I was excited and told by a friend to only cry tears of pride and joy. And I did. But then a few weeks went by and family mealtime and so many other things were different. He was a good eater and I could experiment with food and he ate it. His brothers didn't eat my grand meals and it was no longer fun to cook dinner. Our family had changed forever.\n\nNow another is going to fly away. And I am counting down the days and I am sad. Our family is again going to be changed forever. Our family was changed forever each time we had one of our sons. When we welcome a new baby into our home it was a joyous occasion. We were adding, now we are subtracting.\n\nBut I will put a brave face on and make sure that when he leaves he will have everything he will need to have an organized dorm room. I can control that. I can't control how I will feel. So as someone who enjoys control I will focus on what I know I can do. I can make a list. I can buy stuff. I can make organizing decisions. My friend Geralin Thomas of Metropolitan Organizing, LLC has created a fantastic checklist that we will print off and take with us. I will put this checklist on a clipboard and get to work!\n\nHere is a look at what we have started to accumulate in the last few weeks. We have a box of stuff that I am placing things in as I buy what is on the checklist.\n\n \n\n1. A good area rug. This is often overlooked but dorm floors are often industrial and they need a soft place to land when they hop out of their lofted beds.\n\n \n\n2. Bedding. I have all boys...they don't need anything special. My mom made each of my boys a quilt when they graduated {that is special} a pillow a set of sheets and a mattress pad. My son is getting the sheets from his older brother as he has moved out of the dorm and no longer is in a twin bed. We have an extra twin mattress pad, so done with that category! Sometimes you need twin long sheets, so make sure. If you have a daughter, you have my prayers. They will be coordinating with their roommate and they will plan on having it look like a dorm good enough for HGTV.\n\n \n\n3. Bath items. A few large towels, wash cloths and a shower caddy as well as flip flops. I think a robe is optional as I bought large towels. When deciding on a robe I think it all depends on the length of the walk from the shower to the room and if they are a boy or a girl. When I graduated my mom bought me several sets of brown towels as a graduation gift. It was the worst gift a girl could get. I wanted pink. She gave me practical. I bought my son green that resemble brown. I am my mother!\n\n \n\n4. Electronics. Roommates usually try to coordinate who will bring the TV and gaming systems if you have boys. I have an odd child that does not watch TV but listens to podcasts. He also doesn't play many video games. I know this is a rarity so plan accordingly. We found my oldest had a laptop when he left for college but by his second year he wanted a Surface. A Surface is more portable and easier to take notes on in class. So we will probably skip the laptop purchase with this child.\n\n \n\n5. Hooks. Take advantage of that vertical space. We should have bought stock in 3M as these hooks are genius. My best tip is to put one by the door to hang the keys. They can be used to hang cords from the walls and along beds. Buy a bunch in different styles as you will thank me later. I also send along an over the door hook to hang up towels and jackets.\n\n \n\n6. Desk organizers. They are usually given desks and are expected to study there. They never do. I think desks should leave dorm rooms. Most people gather in common areas to get their homework done. But if you have a desk look at ways to make good use of the space. Pencils and pens are sometimes still used, so best to find a way to store a few. For my oldest it was highlighters that he used most as everything is typed. Make sure that you frame a picture of yourself and place it on their desk so they don't forget what you look like!\n\n \n\n7. Extra storage. Think TV stands and microwave carts. There is often storage here that should be maximized. When out shopping for one, look for drawers and good use of space. Don't just buy it because it looks nice, think practical.  They even make futons with drawers underneath for storage.\n\n \n\n8. Closet storage. I am not a fan of the slim hangers as I think it encourages people to buy more clothes because they have more room. But in the case of a dorm room closet I encourage these hangers. I have purchased two boxes as this son of mine likes clothes. I also have hanging files made for closets with storage in them as well. He can roll of sweaters and pants and place in the pockets. We are all about maximizing that small space. I have locker baskets as well as a set of black quilted boxes with lids for storing items like socks and underwear that can stack.\n\n \n\nJust remember one thing, you have been preparing for this transition for 18 years. They are smart and wise young adults who know how to figure things out. We have been silently showing them how to do things like an adult. They know how to trouble shoot something that is broken by watching a YouTube video. Remember it doesn't have to be perfect. You don't have to have everything on move in day. Whatever you forget they will call you and ask for you to mail it or money to buy it. So forget a few things so that you are guaranteed a call home!\n\n \n\nTo Joyful, Organized Simplicity,\n\n \n\nMS. Simplicity","Melissa Schmalenberger"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:everydaygourmet.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":187,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"everydaygourmet.areavoices.com/1444","permalink":"http://everydaygourmet.areavoices.com/2014/04/15/fried-green-beans/","blogid":"1511","blogdomain":"everydaygourmet.areavoices.com","hostname":"everydaygourmet.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"\"Fried\" Green Beans","content":"Last night I decided to do a little experimenting in making one of my favorite appetizers....Fried Green Beans!  I love the idea of eating green beans as a snack, but I feel a little guilty because they are fried.  It leaves me a little conflicted.  Does it count as a vegetable if it is dripping in grease?  My baked version still has the bread-like coating, but they are so much crunchier than their fried counter parts.  Serve them with a little pizza sauce and it's a sure way to sneak a serving of vegetables in for the day!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n\"Fried\" Green Beans\n\n\t24 green beans, washed and trimmed\n\t1 egg\n\t1/4 cup milk\n\t1/2 cup Bisquick baking mix\n\t1/4 teaspoon garlic powder\n\t2 cups Italian Seasoned Panko Bread Crumbs\n\t1/2 cup pizza sauce\n\nDirections:\n\nPreheat oven to 425 degrees.  In a small bowl, combine egg, milk, Bisquick, and garlic powder.  Whisk with a fork until smooth.  Pour bread crumbs into a shallow bowl.  Dip each bean into the Bisquick mixture, let the excess drip off and then roll in the bread crumbs.  Lay beans onto a sprayed baking sheet and bake for 15 minute or until golden brown.  Serve with pizza sauce.\n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"Last night I decided to do a little experimenting in making one of my favorite appetizers....Fried Green Beans! I love the idea of eating green beans as a snack, but I feel a little guilty because they are fried. It leaves me a little conflicted. Does it count as a vegetable if it is dripping in grease? My baked version still has the bread-like coating, but they are so much crunchier than their fried counter parts. Serve them with a little pizza sauce and it's a sure way to sneak a serving of vegetables in for the day!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n\"Fried\" Green Beans\n\n24 green beans, washed and trimmed\n1 egg\n1/4 cup milk\n1/2 cup Bisquick baking mix\n1/4 teaspoon garlic powder\n2 cups Italian Seasoned Panko Bread Crumbs\n1/2 cup pizza sauce\n\nDirections:\n\nPreheat oven to 425 degrees. In a small bowl, combine egg, milk, Bisquick, and garlic powder. Whisk with a fork until smooth. Pour bread crumbs into a shallow bowl. Dip each bean into the Bisquick mixture, let the excess drip off and then roll in the bread crumbs. Lay beans onto a sprayed baking sheet and bake for 15 minute or until golden brown. Serve with pizza sauce.\n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"Last night I decided to do a little experimenting in making one of my favorite appetizers....Fried Green Beans! I love the idea of eating green beans as a snack, but I feel a little guilty because they are fried. It leaves me a little conflicted. Does it count as a vegetable if it is dripping in grease? My baked version still has the bread-like coating, but they are so much crunchier than their fried counter parts. Serve them with a little pizza sauce and it's a sure way to sneak a serving of vegetables in for the day!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n\"Fried\" Green Beans\n\n24 green beans, washed and trimmed\n1 egg\n1/4 cup milk\n1/2 cup Bisquick baking mix\n1/4 teaspoon garlic powder\n2 cups Italian Seasoned Panko Bread Crumbs\n1/2 cup pizza sauce\n\nDirections:\n\nPreheat oven to 425 degrees. In a small bowl, combine egg, milk, Bisquick, and garlic powder. Whisk with a fork until smooth. Pour bread crumbs into a shallow bowl. Dip each bean into the Bisquick mixture, let the excess drip off and then roll in the bread crumbs. Lay beans onto a sprayed baking sheet and bake for 15 minute or until golden brown. Serve with pizza sauce.\n\n \n\n ","numcomments":1,"author":"Everyday Gourmet","author_s":"http://everydaygourmet.areavoices.com/author/jsevald/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-04-15T01:01:41Z","displaydate":"2014-04-15 01:01:41","displaymodified":"2014-04-15 12:53:28","tags":["appetizer","appetizers","baked","beans","easy","family","food","Fridays","fried","fries","garlic","gourmet","home","hot","life","moms","quick","recipe","recipes","Snacks","taste","tasty","vegetarian"],"categories":["Appetizers"],"spell":["\"Fried\" Green Beans","Last night I decided to do a little experimenting in making one of my favorite appetizers....Fried Green Beans!  I love the idea of eating green beans as a snack, but I feel a little guilty because they are fried.  It leaves me a little conflicted.  Does it count as a vegetable if it is dripping in grease?  My baked version still has the bread-like coating, but they are so much crunchier than their fried counter parts.  Serve them with a little pizza sauce and it's a sure way to sneak a serving of vegetables in for the day!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n\"Fried\" Green Beans\n\n\t24 green beans, washed and trimmed\n\t1 egg\n\t1/4 cup milk\n\t1/2 cup Bisquick baking mix\n\t1/4 teaspoon garlic powder\n\t2 cups Italian Seasoned Panko Bread Crumbs\n\t1/2 cup pizza sauce\n\nDirections:\n\nPreheat oven to 425 degrees.  In a small bowl, combine egg, milk, Bisquick, and garlic powder.  Whisk with a fork until smooth.  Pour bread crumbs into a shallow bowl.  Dip each bean into the Bisquick mixture, let the excess drip off and then roll in the bread crumbs.  Lay beans onto a sprayed baking sheet and bake for 15 minute or until golden brown.  Serve with pizza sauce.\n\n \n\n ","Everyday Gourmet"],"comments":["This looks like an interesting recipe."]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:goodpeoplegoodbusiness.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":78,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"goodpeoplegoodbusiness.areavoices.com/368","permalink":"http://goodpeoplegoodbusiness.areavoices.com/2014/07/14/minimize-your-focus-to-maximize-your-time-at-work/","blogid":"3486","blogdomain":"goodpeoplegoodbusiness.areavoices.com","hostname":"goodpeoplegoodbusiness.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Minimize your focus to maximize your time at work","content":"// \n\n\nBy Dawn Kaiser, Village Business Institute\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_345\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"233\"] Dawn Kaiser, The Village Business Institute[/caption]\n\nTell the truth: Do you answer your emails while talking to others on the phone or even during conference calls? Do you try to eat and work at your desk at the same time? Do you bring your laptop with you to training sessions and then pretend to take notes while you surf the net or work on other documents?\n\nIt’s not surprising that we are feeling overwhelmed and burned out because we are not mastering our time. Instead we are spending too many hours juggling too many things all at once for an extended period of time, which adds stress to our levels.\n\nWhen you try to do too many things at one time, we actually drain our energy level over the course of the day. The best way for you to re-energize and refuel yourself is to actually do the opposite of what most individuals do and that is to minimize your focus in order to maximize your time. I know this from my own experience both in and outside of work. When I focus without interruption and concentrate on doing one thing at a time I get two to three times more work accomplished. This also allows me to then take a break and step away from desk in order to find a sense of real renewal. This isn’t an easy discipline to practice because our culture lifts up the multi-taskers, but truly when you start to look at the time management of highly successful people we find that they are able to set boundaries when it comes to their time that allow them to focus and bring their best to the table.\n\n\n\nHere are a couple behaviors that are worthwhile disciplines to establish in your daily routines.\n\n\tFocus on getting information out before taking in. Julie Morgenstern, author of Organizing from the Inside Out, encourages folks to work on an important project for 60-90 minutes before they check their email in the morning. Spend that time distraction free and then, once done, take a quick break and notice the difference in your energy.\n\tIdentify your ONE Thing. Last year I came across a question from Gary Keller, the co-founder of the Keller Williams Realty. It changed how I tackled my day. He challenges individuals to ask “what’s the ONE Thing you can do such that by doing it everything else will be easier or unnecessary?” Instead of worrying about a laundry list of tasks, you prioritize each activity and take them one at a time in order to move forward.\n\tSet aside thinking/quiet time. Each day create at least one time during the day when you stop working and spend time thinking or being quiet. Let your mind unwind and process all the information that has come in both directly and indirectly. Some of my best ideas come when I am the most still, which is not to say this is an easy discipline but it definitely helps me to get re-energized and be creative.\n\nStop living your life trying to do multiple things at once. We need to slow down in order to be our best selves and, rather than allow the time to master us, master our time.\n\nFor more tips and tricks on how to maximize your time, sign up for Dawn’s “Time Mastery” webinar at thevbistore.com.\n\nAuthor Bio\nDawn Kaiser is an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) trainer with The Village Business Institute. More about Dawn here.\n\n\n\n\n\nThe Village Business Institute's unique team of professionals improve individual and organizational performance through business and organizational solutions. We serve both public and private organizations\n\nVBI solutions include an employee assistance program, coaching, organizational development and strategic planning, workplace mediation, human resource consultation, critical incident stress management, management and employee training, career transition and outplacement services, and specialized services for nonprofits.\n\n ","rawcontent":"// \n\n\nBy Dawn Kaiser, Village Business Institute\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_345\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"233\"] Dawn Kaiser, The Village Business Institute[/caption]\n\nTell the truth: Do you answer your emails while talking to others on the phone or even during conference calls? Do you try to eat and work at your desk at the same time? Do you bring your laptop with you to training sessions and then pretend to take notes while you surf the net or work on other documents?\n\nIts not surprising that we are feeling overwhelmed and burned out because we are not mastering our time. Instead we are spending too many hours juggling too many things all at once for an extended period of time, which adds stress to our levels.\n\nWhen you try to do too many things at one time, we actually drain our energy level over the course of the day. The best way for you to re-energize and refuel yourself is to actually do the opposite of what most individuals do and that is to minimize your focus in order to maximize your time. I know this from my own experience both in and outside of work. When I focus without interruption and concentrate on doing one thing at a time I get two to three times more work accomplished. This also allows me to then take a break and step away from desk in order to find a sense of real renewal. This isnt an easy discipline to practice because our culture lifts up the multi-taskers, but truly when you start to look at the time management of highly successful people we find that they are able to set boundaries when it comes to their time that allow them to focus and bring their best to the table.\n\n\n\nHere are a couple behaviors that are worthwhile disciplines to establish in your daily routines.\n\nFocus on getting information out before taking in. Julie Morgenstern, author of Organizing from the Inside Out, encourages folks to work on an important project for 60-90 minutes before they check their email in the morning. Spend that time distraction free and then, once done, take a quick break and notice the difference in your energy.\nIdentify your ONE Thing. Last year I came across a question from Gary Keller, the co-founder of the Keller Williams Realty. It changed how I tackled my day. He challenges individuals to ask whats the ONE Thing you can do such that by doing it everything else will be easier or unnecessary? Instead of worrying about a laundry list of tasks, you prioritize each activity and take them one at a time in order to move forward.\nSet aside thinking/quiet time. Each day create at least one time during the day when you stop working and spend time thinking or being quiet. Let your mind unwind and process all the information that has come in both directly and indirectly. Some of my best ideas come when I am the most still, which is not to say this is an easy discipline but it definitely helps me to get re-energized and be creative.\n\nStop living your life trying to do multiple things at once. We need to slow down in order to be our best selves and, rather than allow the time to master us, master our time.\n\nFor more tips and tricks on how to maximize your time, sign up for Dawns Time Mastery webinar at thevbistore.com.\n\nAuthor Bio\nDawn Kaiser is an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) trainer with The Village Business Institute. More about Dawn here.\n\n\n\n\n\nThe Village Business Institute's unique team of professionals improve individual and organizational performance through business and organizational solutions.We serve both public and private organizations\n\nVBI solutions include an employee assistance program, coaching, organizational development and strategic planning, workplace mediation, human resource consultation, critical incident stress management, management and employee training, career transition and outplacement services, and specialized services for nonprofits.\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"// \n\n\nBy Dawn Kaiser, Village Business Institute\n\n\n\nTell the truth: Do you answer your emails while talking to others on the phone or even during conference calls? Do you try to eat and work at your desk at the same time? Do you bring your laptop with you to training sessions and then pretend to take notes while you surf the net or work on other documents?\n\nIts not surprising that we are feeling overwhelmed and burned out because we are not mastering our time. Instead we are spending too many hours juggling too many things all at once for an extended period of time, which adds stress to our levels.\n\nWhen you try to do too many things at one time, we actually drain our energy level over the course of the day. The best way for you to re-energize and refuel yourself is to actually do the opposite of what most individuals do and that is to minimize your focus in order to maximize your time. I know this from my own experience both in and outside of work. When I focus without interruption and concentrate on doing one thing at a time I get two to three times more work accomplished. This also allows me to then take a break and step away from desk in order to find a sense of real renewal. This isnt an easy discipline to practice because our culture lifts up the multi-taskers, but truly when you start to look at the time management of highly successful people we find that they are able to set boundaries when it comes to their time that allow them to focus and bring their best to the table.\n\n\n\nHere are a couple behaviors that are worthwhile disciplines to establish in your daily routines.\n\nFocus on getting information out before taking in. Julie Morgenstern, author of Organizing from the Inside Out, encourages folks to work on an important project for 60-90 minutes before they check their email in the morning. Spend that time distraction free and then, once done, take a quick break and notice the difference in your energy.\nIdentify your ONE Thing. Last year I came across a question from Gary Keller, the co-founder of the Keller Williams Realty. It changed how I tackled my day. He challenges individuals to ask whats the ONE Thing you can do such that by doing it everything else will be easier or unnecessary? Instead of worrying about a laundry list of tasks, you prioritize each activity and take them one at a time in order to move forward.\nSet aside thinking/quiet time. Each day create at least one time during the day when you stop working and spend time thinking or being quiet. Let your mind unwind and process all the information that has come in both directly and indirectly. Some of my best ideas come when I am the most still, which is not to say this is an easy discipline but it definitely helps me to get re-energized and be creative.\n\nStop living your life trying to do multiple things at once. We need to slow down in order to be our best selves and, rather than allow the time to master us, master our time.\n\nFor more tips and tricks on how to maximize your time, sign up for Dawns Time Mastery webinar at thevbistore.com.\n\nAuthor Bio\nDawn Kaiser is an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) trainer with The Village Business Institute. More about Dawn here.\n\n\n\n\n\nThe Village Business Institute's unique team of professionals improve individual and organizational performance through business and organizational solutions.We serve both public and private organizations\n\nVBI solutions include an employee assistance program, coaching, organizational development and strategic planning, workplace mediation, human resource consultation, critical incident stress management, management and employee training, career transition and outplacement services, and specialized services for nonprofits.\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"J. Shane Mercer","author_s":"http://goodpeoplegoodbusiness.areavoices.com/author/shane/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-14T16:25:22Z","displaydate":"2014-07-14 11:25:22","displaymodified":"2014-07-14 18:03:08","tags":["business","news","updates"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Minimize your focus to maximize your time at work","// \n\n\nBy Dawn Kaiser, Village Business Institute\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_345\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"233\"] Dawn Kaiser, The Village Business Institute[/caption]\n\nTell the truth: Do you answer your emails while talking to others on the phone or even during conference calls? Do you try to eat and work at your desk at the same time? Do you bring your laptop with you to training sessions and then pretend to take notes while you surf the net or work on other documents?\n\nIt’s not surprising that we are feeling overwhelmed and burned out because we are not mastering our time. Instead we are spending too many hours juggling too many things all at once for an extended period of time, which adds stress to our levels.\n\nWhen you try to do too many things at one time, we actually drain our energy level over the course of the day. The best way for you to re-energize and refuel yourself is to actually do the opposite of what most individuals do and that is to minimize your focus in order to maximize your time. I know this from my own experience both in and outside of work. When I focus without interruption and concentrate on doing one thing at a time I get two to three times more work accomplished. This also allows me to then take a break and step away from desk in order to find a sense of real renewal. This isn’t an easy discipline to practice because our culture lifts up the multi-taskers, but truly when you start to look at the time management of highly successful people we find that they are able to set boundaries when it comes to their time that allow them to focus and bring their best to the table.\n\n\n\nHere are a couple behaviors that are worthwhile disciplines to establish in your daily routines.\n\n\tFocus on getting information out before taking in. Julie Morgenstern, author of Organizing from the Inside Out, encourages folks to work on an important project for 60-90 minutes before they check their email in the morning. Spend that time distraction free and then, once done, take a quick break and notice the difference in your energy.\n\tIdentify your ONE Thing. Last year I came across a question from Gary Keller, the co-founder of the Keller Williams Realty. It changed how I tackled my day. He challenges individuals to ask “what’s the ONE Thing you can do such that by doing it everything else will be easier or unnecessary?” Instead of worrying about a laundry list of tasks, you prioritize each activity and take them one at a time in order to move forward.\n\tSet aside thinking/quiet time. Each day create at least one time during the day when you stop working and spend time thinking or being quiet. Let your mind unwind and process all the information that has come in both directly and indirectly. Some of my best ideas come when I am the most still, which is not to say this is an easy discipline but it definitely helps me to get re-energized and be creative.\n\nStop living your life trying to do multiple things at once. We need to slow down in order to be our best selves and, rather than allow the time to master us, master our time.\n\nFor more tips and tricks on how to maximize your time, sign up for Dawn’s “Time Mastery” webinar at thevbistore.com.\n\nAuthor Bio\nDawn Kaiser is an Employee Assistance Program (EAP) trainer with The Village Business Institute. More about Dawn here.\n\n\n\n\n\nThe Village Business Institute's unique team of professionals improve individual and organizational performance through business and organizational solutions. We serve both public and private organizations\n\nVBI solutions include an employee assistance program, coaching, organizational development and strategic planning, workplace mediation, human resource consultation, critical incident stress management, management and employee training, career transition and outplacement services, and specialized services for nonprofits.\n\n ","J. Shane Mercer"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:realmoney.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":106,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"realmoney.areavoices.com/831","permalink":"http://realmoney.areavoices.com/2014/07/03/how-does-a-certified-financial-professional-respond-to-job-loss-in-her-family/","blogid":"7503","blogdomain":"realmoney.areavoices.com","hostname":"realmoney.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"How does a certified financial professional respond to job loss in her family?","content":"[caption id=\"attachment_832\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Terri HeinenCertified Financial ProfessionalVillage Financial Resource Center[/caption]\nTwo weeks ago we were notified that my husband’s employer, a large printing company , was going to close the local plant in 60 days. 280 people will be out of work. My husband started at this company 31 years ago, right after graduating from high school, with plans of saving money for college. He enjoyed what he was doing, the pay was decent and he was being promoted on a regular basis so he never took the time to go to any type of post-secondary educational program.\nWas the closing a shock? Not really….printing is a dying industry. But we hoped he could maintain his job until our children were through college. This company has been through numerous buyouts, mergers and a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. We have been working hard to structure our personal finances over the years in such a way that we would not lose our house if he lost his job, we have the recommended 3 to 6 months of living expenses in a savings account and no credit card debt.\nSo we have “prepared” for this day…..yet, to have the major breadwinner in the family lose the income source our family has relied on for 30 years is still SCARY. The “what-if’s” play out in my mind: What if comparable employment is not found in a reasonable time frame? Is it realistic to expect this level of employment without a college education? Health insurance premiums can become major expenses depending on the cost of family coverage – how will this impact the household finances? We have two sons in college – will we be able to honor our offer to help them with college expenses?\nI find my anxiety levels rising and falling like a roller coaster, in part because of what I see as a financial counselor. I meet with individuals on a regular basis that have been seeking employment for an extended period of time without any luck. Many of these individuals hold college degrees. I also see folks that have exhausted all funds from 401k plans - some substantial amounts – to try and stay current on debt obligations once their income no longer supports their lifestyles. I work with seniors that are struggling to pay for basic needs because they used retirement funds to overcome a hardship. Some were self-created hardships and some were situational.\n So the advice I give to others, I now need to apply to my own situation. If you're dealing with the loss of a job, these tips could apply to you, as well:\n\n\n\tChange spending habits the day you learn of the change in employment status – too many times I’ve seen folks that assumed they would find employment before unemployment benefits ran out and they waited too long to adjust spending. This is the perfect time to closely evaluate where we spend our money, what is necessary, what are we locked into and what is fluff. We started eliminating fluff and looking for cheaper alternatives to some of our “needs.” (It’s amazing what we spend on technology between cell phones, TV and internet – and our parents used to complain about long distance phone bills that were more than $50! Today families are spending anywhere from $50 to $500 plus on these services.) This is an area where my husband and I differ on the importance level that some of these “wants” hold in our everyday lives. It can be a challenge compromising on what we can temporarily give up while we prepare for a potential reduction in income.\n\tIn most cases, as counselors, we do not recommend you rob your future (retirement funds) to sustain material possessions today – don’t be afraid to sell the boat, the camper or even the house if need be. These items can be replaced when your situation improves. Or look for ways to make money with these assets by renting them out (will want to visit with your insurance agent and you will most likely have an increase in your insurance premium –weigh the benefits against the cost). Apartment living is generally cheaper than home ownership, even if rent is similar to a mortgage payment. Another benefit to apartment living is lower utility expenses and no property maintenance or repairs to fit into a budget.\n\tActively look for work and use the professional services available at your local unemployment agency. In my husband’s situation, he has never had to prepare a resume or interview for a position outside his current place of employment. He is taking advantage of the trainings he has been offered.\n\tApply with various temporary employment agencies – especially as your unemployment benefits are dwindling. Many times you can be placed in long-term positions that can help make ends meet, even if the position is not paying you at a level of your previous employment, you are still working, which is good for your physical and mental health.\n\tGet a part-time job if you run short on income to cover all expenses – this can apply to any contributing member of the household. You may feel tired after working more hours but the extra money may relieve some of the stress that accompanies a cash flow deficit.\n\nI let the fear of the unknown get the best of me at times, but today is a low-level anxiety day. It helps to take an active role in making changes to the spending and planning for a reduced income level. I’d rather be over-prepared than under-prepared. It also gives us a new adventure, and I will have some additional personal experiences in my tool box when meeting with clients.\n\n\n\n\nIf you are facing financial difficulties or just have money-related questions, The Village Financial Resource Center is here to help. Call us at (800) 450-4019 or visit helpwithmoney.org.\n\n","rawcontent":"[caption id=\"attachment_832\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Terri HeinenCertified Financial ProfessionalVillage Financial Resource Center[/caption]\nTwo weeks ago we were notified that my husbands employer, a large printing company , was going to close the local plant in 60 days. 280 people will be out of work. My husband started at this company 31 years ago, right after graduating from high school, with plans of saving money for college. He enjoyed what he was doing, the pay was decent and he was being promoted on a regular basis so he never took the time to go to any type of post-secondary educational program.\nWas the closing a shock? Not really.printing is a dying industry. But we hoped he could maintain his job until our children were through college. This company has been through numerous buyouts, mergers and a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. We have been working hard to structure our personal finances over the years in such a way that we would not lose our house if he lost his job, we have the recommended 3 to 6 months of living expenses in a savings account and no credit card debt.\nSo we have prepared for this day..yet, to have the major breadwinner in the family lose the income source our family has relied on for 30 years is still SCARY. The what-ifs play out in my mind: What if comparable employment is not found in a reasonable time frame? Is it realistic to expect this level of employment without a college education? Health insurance premiums can become major expenses depending on the cost of family coverage how will this impact the household finances? We have two sons in college will we be able to honor our offer to help them with college expenses?\nI find my anxiety levels rising and falling like a roller coaster, in part because of what I see as a financial counselor. I meet with individuals on a regular basis that have been seeking employment for an extended period of time without any luck. Many of these individuals hold college degrees. I also see folks that have exhausted all funds from 401k plans - some substantial amounts to try and stay current on debt obligations once their income no longer supports their lifestyles. I work with seniors that are struggling to pay for basic needs because they used retirement funds to overcome a hardship. Some were self-created hardships and some were situational.\nSo the advice I give to others, I now need to apply to my own situation. If you're dealing with the loss of a job, these tips could apply to you, as well:\n\n\nChange spending habits the day you learn of the change in employment status too many times Ive seen folks that assumed they would find employment before unemployment benefits ran out and they waited too long to adjust spending. This is the perfect time to closely evaluate where we spend our money, what is necessary, what are we locked into and what is fluff. We started eliminating fluff and looking for cheaper alternatives to some of our needs. (Its amazing what we spend on technology between cell phones, TV and internet and our parents used to complain about long distance phone bills that were more than $50! Today families are spending anywhere from $50 to $500 plus on these services.) This is an area where my husband and I differ on the importance level that some of these wants hold in our everyday lives. It can be a challenge compromising on what we can temporarily give up while we prepare for a potential reduction in income.\nIn most cases, as counselors, we do not recommend you rob your future (retirement funds) to sustain material possessions today dont be afraid to sell the boat, the camper or even the house if need be. These items can be replaced when your situation improves. Or look for ways to make money with these assets by renting them out (will want to visit with your insurance agent and you will most likely have an increase in your insurance premium weigh the benefits against the cost). Apartment living is generally cheaper than home ownership, even if rent is similar to a mortgage payment. Another benefit to apartment living is lower utility expenses and no property maintenance or repairs to fit into a budget.\nActively look for work and use the professional services available at your local unemployment agency. In my husbands situation, he has never had to prepare a resume or interview for a position outside his current place of employment. He is taking advantage of the trainings he has been offered.\nApply with various temporary employment agencies especially as your unemployment benefits are dwindling. Many times you can be placed in long-term positions that can help make ends meet, even if the position is not paying you at a level of your previous employment, you are still working, which is good for your physical and mental health.\nGet a part-time job if you run short on income to cover all expenses this can apply to any contributing member of the household. You may feel tired after working more hours but the extra money may relieve some of the stress that accompanies a cash flow deficit.\n\nI let the fear of the unknown get the best of me at times, but today is a low-level anxiety day. It helps to take an active role in making changes to the spending and planning for a reduced income level. Id rather be over-prepared than under-prepared. It also gives us a new adventure, and I will have some additional personal experiences in my tool box when meeting with clients.\n\n\n\n\nIf you are facing financial difficulties or just have money-related questions, The Village Financial Resource Center is here to help. Call us at (800) 450-4019 or visit helpwithmoney.org.\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"\nTwo weeks ago we were notified that my husbands employer, a large printing company , was going to close the local plant in 60 days. 280 people will be out of work. My husband started at this company 31 years ago, right after graduating from high school, with plans of saving money for college. He enjoyed what he was doing, the pay was decent and he was being promoted on a regular basis so he never took the time to go to any type of post-secondary educational program.\nWas the closing a shock? Not really.printing is a dying industry. But we hoped he could maintain his job until our children were through college. This company has been through numerous buyouts, mergers and a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. We have been working hard to structure our personal finances over the years in such a way that we would not lose our house if he lost his job, we have the recommended 3 to 6 months of living expenses in a savings account and no credit card debt.\nSo we have prepared for this day..yet, to have the major breadwinner in the family lose the income source our family has relied on for 30 years is still SCARY. The what-ifs play out in my mind: What if comparable employment is not found in a reasonable time frame? Is it realistic to expect this level of employment without a college education? Health insurance premiums can become major expenses depending on the cost of family coverage how will this impact the household finances? We have two sons in college will we be able to honor our offer to help them with college expenses?\nI find my anxiety levels rising and falling like a roller coaster, in part because of what I see as a financial counselor. I meet with individuals on a regular basis that have been seeking employment for an extended period of time without any luck. Many of these individuals hold college degrees. I also see folks that have exhausted all funds from 401k plans - some substantial amounts to try and stay current on debt obligations once their income no longer supports their lifestyles. I work with seniors that are struggling to pay for basic needs because they used retirement funds to overcome a hardship. Some were self-created hardships and some were situational.\nSo the advice I give to others, I now need to apply to my own situation. If you're dealing with the loss of a job, these tips could apply to you, as well:\n\n\nChange spending habits the day you learn of the change in employment status too many times Ive seen folks that assumed they would find employment before unemployment benefits ran out and they waited too long to adjust spending. This is the perfect time to closely evaluate where we spend our money, what is necessary, what are we locked into and what is fluff. We started eliminating fluff and looking for cheaper alternatives to some of our needs. (Its amazing what we spend on technology between cell phones, TV and internet and our parents used to complain about long distance phone bills that were more than $50! Today families are spending anywhere from $50 to $500 plus on these services.) This is an area where my husband and I differ on the importance level that some of these wants hold in our everyday lives. It can be a challenge compromising on what we can temporarily give up while we prepare for a potential reduction in income.\nIn most cases, as counselors, we do not recommend you rob your future (retirement funds) to sustain material possessions today dont be afraid to sell the boat, the camper or even the house if need be. These items can be replaced when your situation improves. Or look for ways to make money with these assets by renting them out (will want to visit with your insurance agent and you will most likely have an increase in your insurance premium weigh the benefits against the cost). Apartment living is generally cheaper than home ownership, even if rent is similar to a mortgage payment. Another benefit to apartment living is lower utility expenses and no property maintenance or repairs to fit into a budget.\nActively look for work and use the professional services available at your local unemployment agency. In my husbands situation, he has never had to prepare a resume or interview for a position outside his current place of employment. He is taking advantage of the trainings he has been offered.\nApply with various temporary employment agencies especially as your unemployment benefits are dwindling. Many times you can be placed in long-term positions that can help make ends meet, even if the position is not paying you at a level of your previous employment, you are still working, which is good for your physical and mental health.\nGet a part-time job if you run short on income to cover all expenses this can apply to any contributing member of the household. You may feel tired after working more hours but the extra money may relieve some of the stress that accompanies a cash flow deficit.\n\nI let the fear of the unknown get the best of me at times, but today is a low-level anxiety day. It helps to take an active role in making changes to the spending and planning for a reduced income level. Id rather be over-prepared than under-prepared. It also gives us a new adventure, and I will have some additional personal experiences in my tool box when meeting with clients.\n\n\n\n\nIf you are facing financial difficulties or just have money-related questions, The Village Financial Resource Center is here to help. Call us at (800) 450-4019 or visit helpwithmoney.org.\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"J. Shane Mercer","author_s":"http://realmoney.areavoices.com/author/shane/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-03T15:18:51Z","displaydate":"2014-07-03 10:18:51","displaymodified":"2014-07-03 10:26:09","tags":["business","family","money","shesays","updates"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["How does a certified financial professional respond to job loss in her family?","[caption id=\"attachment_832\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Terri HeinenCertified Financial ProfessionalVillage Financial Resource Center[/caption]\nTwo weeks ago we were notified that my husband’s employer, a large printing company , was going to close the local plant in 60 days. 280 people will be out of work. My husband started at this company 31 years ago, right after graduating from high school, with plans of saving money for college. He enjoyed what he was doing, the pay was decent and he was being promoted on a regular basis so he never took the time to go to any type of post-secondary educational program.\nWas the closing a shock? Not really….printing is a dying industry. But we hoped he could maintain his job until our children were through college. This company has been through numerous buyouts, mergers and a Chapter 11 bankruptcy. We have been working hard to structure our personal finances over the years in such a way that we would not lose our house if he lost his job, we have the recommended 3 to 6 months of living expenses in a savings account and no credit card debt.\nSo we have “prepared” for this day…..yet, to have the major breadwinner in the family lose the income source our family has relied on for 30 years is still SCARY. The “what-if’s” play out in my mind: What if comparable employment is not found in a reasonable time frame? Is it realistic to expect this level of employment without a college education? Health insurance premiums can become major expenses depending on the cost of family coverage – how will this impact the household finances? We have two sons in college – will we be able to honor our offer to help them with college expenses?\nI find my anxiety levels rising and falling like a roller coaster, in part because of what I see as a financial counselor. I meet with individuals on a regular basis that have been seeking employment for an extended period of time without any luck. Many of these individuals hold college degrees. I also see folks that have exhausted all funds from 401k plans - some substantial amounts – to try and stay current on debt obligations once their income no longer supports their lifestyles. I work with seniors that are struggling to pay for basic needs because they used retirement funds to overcome a hardship. Some were self-created hardships and some were situational.\n So the advice I give to others, I now need to apply to my own situation. If you're dealing with the loss of a job, these tips could apply to you, as well:\n\n\n\tChange spending habits the day you learn of the change in employment status – too many times I’ve seen folks that assumed they would find employment before unemployment benefits ran out and they waited too long to adjust spending. This is the perfect time to closely evaluate where we spend our money, what is necessary, what are we locked into and what is fluff. We started eliminating fluff and looking for cheaper alternatives to some of our “needs.” (It’s amazing what we spend on technology between cell phones, TV and internet – and our parents used to complain about long distance phone bills that were more than $50! Today families are spending anywhere from $50 to $500 plus on these services.) This is an area where my husband and I differ on the importance level that some of these “wants” hold in our everyday lives. It can be a challenge compromising on what we can temporarily give up while we prepare for a potential reduction in income.\n\tIn most cases, as counselors, we do not recommend you rob your future (retirement funds) to sustain material possessions today – don’t be afraid to sell the boat, the camper or even the house if need be. These items can be replaced when your situation improves. Or look for ways to make money with these assets by renting them out (will want to visit with your insurance agent and you will most likely have an increase in your insurance premium –weigh the benefits against the cost). Apartment living is generally cheaper than home ownership, even if rent is similar to a mortgage payment. Another benefit to apartment living is lower utility expenses and no property maintenance or repairs to fit into a budget.\n\tActively look for work and use the professional services available at your local unemployment agency. In my husband’s situation, he has never had to prepare a resume or interview for a position outside his current place of employment. He is taking advantage of the trainings he has been offered.\n\tApply with various temporary employment agencies – especially as your unemployment benefits are dwindling. Many times you can be placed in long-term positions that can help make ends meet, even if the position is not paying you at a level of your previous employment, you are still working, which is good for your physical and mental health.\n\tGet a part-time job if you run short on income to cover all expenses – this can apply to any contributing member of the household. You may feel tired after working more hours but the extra money may relieve some of the stress that accompanies a cash flow deficit.\n\nI let the fear of the unknown get the best of me at times, but today is a low-level anxiety day. It helps to take an active role in making changes to the spending and planning for a reduced income level. I’d rather be over-prepared than under-prepared. It also gives us a new adventure, and I will have some additional personal experiences in my tool box when meeting with clients.\n\n\n\n\nIf you are facing financial difficulties or just have money-related questions, The Village Financial Resource Center is here to help. Call us at (800) 450-4019 or visit helpwithmoney.org.\n\n","J. Shane Mercer"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:arlenecocosprairiekitchen.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":65,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"arlenecocosprairiekitchen.areavoices.com/2175","permalink":"http://arlenecocosprairiekitchen.areavoices.com/2013/12/13/top-ten-favorite-holiday-dishes-for-easy-entertaining-part-one/","blogid":"7295","blogdomain":"arlenecocosprairiekitchen.areavoices.com","hostname":"arlenecocosprairiekitchen.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Top Ten Favorite Holiday Dishes for Easy Entertaining- Part One","content":"During the holidays, most of my days are filled with making cookies by the thousands. By the time the weekend comes, I want to entertain and have my friends over, but I am pretty tired at the end of most weeks. That's why I plan ahead to make having people over a breeze.\n\nFirst of all I keep the meals really simple. Think Roast Chicken, wild rice and homegrown carrots from the root cellar.\n\nAppetizers are easy spreads and breads that I have squirreled away from my trips to the gourmet stores.\n\nDessert is sometimes a production if I have energy or It's fresh fruit and ice cream if I don't.\n\nHere are a few do ahead dishes that work great for easy dinner parties. Sometimes I let my guests bring things, but most often I tell them to just bring themselves and a nice bottle of wine.\n\n \n\nSimple roast Chicken is always a welcome comfort of winter-\n\nMartin's Roast Chicken- By far the most popular post on my blog. It's a winner for sure, and I love how it makes the house smell like chicken and garlic...\n\nLately, I have been roasting some local birds, it takes a little longer because the average is about 7 pounds, but the results are worth the wait.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1517\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"363\"] Martin's Roast Chicken, Photo by Dave Ballard[/caption]\n\n Martin's Famous Roast Chicken (click on title for link to post)\n\n \n\nKeeping guests busy in the kitchen-\n\nRisotto is a great dish for entertaining. Although it's not a do-ahead, all the ingredients can be prepped ahead of time and assembled at the last minute. The main advantage of serving this dish is that gives that person that comes over that always wants to help in the kitchen.\n\nWith Risotto, you have to stand over it for about 20 minutes, adding stock. But you can have a glass of bubbly in your hand while you are doing it..\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2039\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Wild Mushrooms are the best![/caption]\n\nWild Mushroom Risotto\n\n\n \n\nApres Ski Bowl of Green-\n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew is fast becoming a favorite in our house. Great for a casual meal around a fire or a pot on the stove for drop in guests, it holds like a champ. I know it's chilly outside to be entertaining, but bonfires are great reasons to have people over. You can eat it standing up with a chunk of cornbread on the side of the bowl. It's great for after ski parties too. At our cabin in the woods, we have a lot of winter company and I make a big pot of Green Chile and serve it right by the fire for a late afternoon lunch.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2098\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Cook it until the potatoes are tender..[/caption]\n\n \n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew\n\n \n\nIt's the Minnesota State Dish for a reason-\n\nHotdish- one word. Casserole for the non Minnesotans. Talk about a great do-ahead meal that warms the heart! I serve mine with a Louisiana Influence-  crawfish tail meat. It can be purchased at of all places Walmart. I serve with with home made crusty bread and a big green salad.  It works great for a crowd of say 10-15 people, just make a couple of them.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2031\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"2048\"] Crawfish, ready for the pot[/caption]\n\n \n\n Crawfish Hotdish\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken is perfect for a Mediterranean Dinner Party\n\nThis recipe can be totally done the day before and reheated. It's the ultimate easy entree.\n\nGreat for pot luck dinners, as it can be reheated in the microwave. I make it with Chicken thighs. Meaty and full of flavor, they hold well while waiting for guests.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1900\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Martini Chicken[/caption]\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken\n\n \n\nStay tuned next week for more easy dishes for entertaining...","rawcontent":"During the holidays, most of my days are filled with making cookies by the thousands. By the time the weekend comes, I want to entertain and have my friends over, but I am pretty tired at the end of most weeks. That's why I plan ahead to make having people over a breeze.\n\nFirst of all I keep the meals really simple. Think Roast Chicken, wild rice and homegrown carrots from the root cellar.\n\nAppetizers are easy spreads and breads that I have squirreled away from my trips to the gourmet stores.\n\nDessert is sometimes a production if I have energy or It's fresh fruit and ice cream if I don't.\n\nHere are a few do ahead dishes that work great for easy dinner parties. Sometimes I let my guests bring things, but most often I tell them to just bring themselves and a nice bottle of wine.\n\n \n\nSimple roast Chicken is always a welcome comfort of winter-\n\nMartin's Roast Chicken- By far the most popular post on my blog. It's a winner for sure, and I love how it makes the house smell like chicken and garlic...\n\nLately, I have been roasting some local birds, it takes a little longer because the average is about 7 pounds, but the results are worth the wait.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1517\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"363\"] Martin's Roast Chicken, Photo by Dave Ballard[/caption]\n\nMartin's Famous Roast Chicken (click on title for link to post)\n\n \n\nKeeping guests busy in the kitchen-\n\nRisotto is a great dish for entertaining. Although it's not a do-ahead, all the ingredients can be prepped ahead of time and assembled at the last minute. The main advantage of serving this dish is that gives that person that comes over that always wants to help in the kitchen.\n\nWith Risotto, you have to stand over it for about 20 minutes, adding stock. But you can have a glass of bubbly in your hand while you are doing it..\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2039\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Wild Mushrooms are the best![/caption]\n\nWild Mushroom Risotto\n\n\n \n\nApres Ski Bowl of Green-\n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew is fast becoming a favorite in our house. Great for a casual meal around a fire or a pot on the stove for drop in guests, it holds like a champ. I know it's chilly outside to be entertaining, but bonfires are great reasons to have people over. You can eat it standing up with a chunk of cornbread on the side of the bowl. It's great for after ski parties too. At our cabin in the woods, we have a lot of winter company and I make a big pot of Green Chile and serve it right by the fire for a late afternoon lunch.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2098\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Cook it until the potatoes are tender..[/caption]\n\n \n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew\n\n \n\nIt's the Minnesota State Dish for a reason-\n\nHotdish- one word. Casserole for the non Minnesotans. Talk about a great do-ahead meal that warms the heart! I serve mine with a Louisiana Influence- crawfish tail meat. It can be purchased at of all places Walmart. I serve with with home made crusty bread and a big green salad. It works great for a crowd of say 10-15 people, just make a couple of them.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2031\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"2048\"] Crawfish, ready for the pot[/caption]\n\n \n\nCrawfish Hotdish\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken is perfect for a Mediterranean Dinner Party\n\nThis recipe can be totally done the day before and reheated. It's the ultimate easy entree.\n\nGreat for pot luck dinners, as it can be reheated in the microwave. I make it with Chicken thighs. Meaty and full of flavor, they hold well while waiting for guests.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1900\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Martini Chicken[/caption]\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken\n\n \n\nStay tuned next week for more easy dishes for entertaining...","contentnoshortcodes":"During the holidays, most of my days are filled with making cookies by the thousands. By the time the weekend comes, I want to entertain and have my friends over, but I am pretty tired at the end of most weeks. That's why I plan ahead to make having people over a breeze.\n\nFirst of all I keep the meals really simple. Think Roast Chicken, wild rice and homegrown carrots from the root cellar.\n\nAppetizers are easy spreads and breads that I have squirreled away from my trips to the gourmet stores.\n\nDessert is sometimes a production if I have energy or It's fresh fruit and ice cream if I don't.\n\nHere are a few do ahead dishes that work great for easy dinner parties. Sometimes I let my guests bring things, but most often I tell them to just bring themselves and a nice bottle of wine.\n\n \n\nSimple roast Chicken is always a welcome comfort of winter-\n\nMartin's Roast Chicken- By far the most popular post on my blog. It's a winner for sure, and I love how it makes the house smell like chicken and garlic...\n\nLately, I have been roasting some local birds, it takes a little longer because the average is about 7 pounds, but the results are worth the wait.\n\n\n\nMartin's Famous Roast Chicken (click on title for link to post)\n\n \n\nKeeping guests busy in the kitchen-\n\nRisotto is a great dish for entertaining. Although it's not a do-ahead, all the ingredients can be prepped ahead of time and assembled at the last minute. The main advantage of serving this dish is that gives that person that comes over that always wants to help in the kitchen.\n\nWith Risotto, you have to stand over it for about 20 minutes, adding stock. But you can have a glass of bubbly in your hand while you are doing it..\n\n\n\nWild Mushroom Risotto\n\n\n \n\nApres Ski Bowl of Green-\n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew is fast becoming a favorite in our house. Great for a casual meal around a fire or a pot on the stove for drop in guests, it holds like a champ. I know it's chilly outside to be entertaining, but bonfires are great reasons to have people over. You can eat it standing up with a chunk of cornbread on the side of the bowl. It's great for after ski parties too. At our cabin in the woods, we have a lot of winter company and I make a big pot of Green Chile and serve it right by the fire for a late afternoon lunch.\n\n\n\n \n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew\n\n \n\nIt's the Minnesota State Dish for a reason-\n\nHotdish- one word. Casserole for the non Minnesotans. Talk about a great do-ahead meal that warms the heart! I serve mine with a Louisiana Influence- crawfish tail meat. It can be purchased at of all places Walmart. I serve with with home made crusty bread and a big green salad. It works great for a crowd of say 10-15 people, just make a couple of them.\n\n\n\n \n\nCrawfish Hotdish\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken is perfect for a Mediterranean Dinner Party\n\nThis recipe can be totally done the day before and reheated. It's the ultimate easy entree.\n\nGreat for pot luck dinners, as it can be reheated in the microwave. I make it with Chicken thighs. Meaty and full of flavor, they hold well while waiting for guests.\n\n\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken\n\n \n\nStay tuned next week for more easy dishes for entertaining...","numcomments":0,"author":"Arlene Coco","author_s":"http://arlenecocosprairiekitchen.areavoices.com/author/ishould3/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-12-13T16:40:00Z","displaydate":"2013-12-13 10:40:00","displaymodified":"2013-12-13 10:40:20","tags":["cooking","food","holiday food","one dish meals","recipes"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Top Ten Favorite Holiday Dishes for Easy Entertaining- Part One","During the holidays, most of my days are filled with making cookies by the thousands. By the time the weekend comes, I want to entertain and have my friends over, but I am pretty tired at the end of most weeks. That's why I plan ahead to make having people over a breeze.\n\nFirst of all I keep the meals really simple. Think Roast Chicken, wild rice and homegrown carrots from the root cellar.\n\nAppetizers are easy spreads and breads that I have squirreled away from my trips to the gourmet stores.\n\nDessert is sometimes a production if I have energy or It's fresh fruit and ice cream if I don't.\n\nHere are a few do ahead dishes that work great for easy dinner parties. Sometimes I let my guests bring things, but most often I tell them to just bring themselves and a nice bottle of wine.\n\n \n\nSimple roast Chicken is always a welcome comfort of winter-\n\nMartin's Roast Chicken- By far the most popular post on my blog. It's a winner for sure, and I love how it makes the house smell like chicken and garlic...\n\nLately, I have been roasting some local birds, it takes a little longer because the average is about 7 pounds, but the results are worth the wait.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1517\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"363\"] Martin's Roast Chicken, Photo by Dave Ballard[/caption]\n\n Martin's Famous Roast Chicken (click on title for link to post)\n\n \n\nKeeping guests busy in the kitchen-\n\nRisotto is a great dish for entertaining. Although it's not a do-ahead, all the ingredients can be prepped ahead of time and assembled at the last minute. The main advantage of serving this dish is that gives that person that comes over that always wants to help in the kitchen.\n\nWith Risotto, you have to stand over it for about 20 minutes, adding stock. But you can have a glass of bubbly in your hand while you are doing it..\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2039\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Wild Mushrooms are the best![/caption]\n\nWild Mushroom Risotto\n\n\n \n\nApres Ski Bowl of Green-\n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew is fast becoming a favorite in our house. Great for a casual meal around a fire or a pot on the stove for drop in guests, it holds like a champ. I know it's chilly outside to be entertaining, but bonfires are great reasons to have people over. You can eat it standing up with a chunk of cornbread on the side of the bowl. It's great for after ski parties too. At our cabin in the woods, we have a lot of winter company and I make a big pot of Green Chile and serve it right by the fire for a late afternoon lunch.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2098\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Cook it until the potatoes are tender..[/caption]\n\n \n\nVail Green Chile Pork Stew\n\n \n\nIt's the Minnesota State Dish for a reason-\n\nHotdish- one word. Casserole for the non Minnesotans. Talk about a great do-ahead meal that warms the heart! I serve mine with a Louisiana Influence-  crawfish tail meat. It can be purchased at of all places Walmart. I serve with with home made crusty bread and a big green salad.  It works great for a crowd of say 10-15 people, just make a couple of them.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_2031\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"2048\"] Crawfish, ready for the pot[/caption]\n\n \n\n Crawfish Hotdish\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken is perfect for a Mediterranean Dinner Party\n\nThis recipe can be totally done the day before and reheated. It's the ultimate easy entree.\n\nGreat for pot luck dinners, as it can be reheated in the microwave. I make it with Chicken thighs. Meaty and full of flavor, they hold well while waiting for guests.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1900\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"640\"] Martini Chicken[/caption]\n\n \n\nMartini Chicken\n\n \n\nStay tuned next week for more easy dishes for entertaining...","Arlene Coco"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:travelingtod.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":65,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"travelingtod.areavoices.com/187","permalink":"http://travelingtod.areavoices.com/2012/12/04/new-years-eve-around-the-world/","blogid":"4219","blogdomain":"travelingtod.areavoices.com","hostname":"travelingtod.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"New Year’s Eve Around the World","content":"New Year’s Eve is a truly worldwide event, and a great holiday to experience away from home. One of the world’s most iconic celebrations is in Sydney, Australia, which puts on a spectacular fireworks display in Sydney Harbor. Actually, there are two displays: a 9 p.m. show to accommodate families with young (or not-so-young) members who will fall asleep before midnight; and a show that starts at the stroke of 12 a.m. There’s a lot to see in the harbor before and between the fireworks, too, including demonstrations of aerial acrobatics and a parade of vessels illuminated by miles and miles of rope lights.\n\n \n\nFor a more exotic far eastern celebration, consider Tokyo, Japan. New Year is an important holiday here, a time to let go of old sorrows and welcome new hopes of good fortune. There are “Countdown Parities” all over the city, and when the clock strikes midnight, you can join the crowds who head to the city’s shrines and temples for the first visit of the New Year. The atmosphere at most shrines is festive, with food and lucky charms for sale.\n\n \n\nTo be in the center of the celebration in Paris, France, head to the Champs-Elysees. There are lots of cafes and clubs along the famous street where you can dine and dance while waiting for midnight. At midnight, the Eiffel Tower will light up as fireworks illuminate the sky. To celebrate with a smaller crowd, head to the plaza in front of Sacré-Coeur Basilica in Montmartre, the city’s highest point. You’ll have a view of the fireworks, and there are plenty of clubs and bars in the surrounding streets.\n\n \n\nIn Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, New Year’s Eve – commonly referred to as Réveillon – is second only to Carnival for glamorous fun. You can attend an elegant Réveillon party at one of the city’s hotels or museums. Or, head to the beach at Copacabana to enjoy live music from multiple stages and see a massive fireworks display. Note that it’s traditional to wear white to this party, which attracts as many as two million people to the 2.5 miles of beachfront.\n\n \n\nAs always, all eyes will be on New York City as the famous New Year’s Eve Ball descends in Times Square just before midnight. While the live music and blizzard of confetti in Times Square are fantastic, there are celebrations and special performance across the city, from the New York Philharmonic at Lincoln Center to the Concert for Peace at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.\n\n \n\nTo make your arrangements for a global New Year’s Eve celebration, talk with your travel professional.","rawcontent":"New Years Eve is a truly worldwide event, and a great holiday to experience away from home. One of the worlds most iconic celebrations is in Sydney, Australia, which puts on a spectacular fireworks display in Sydney Harbor. Actually, there are two displays: a 9 p.m. show to accommodate families with young (or not-so-young) members who will fall asleep before midnight; and a show that starts at the stroke of 12 a.m. Theres a lot to see in the harbor before and between the fireworks, too, including demonstrations of aerial acrobatics and a parade of vessels illuminated by miles and miles of rope lights.\n\n \n\nFor a more exotic far eastern celebration, consider Tokyo, Japan. New Year is an important holiday here, a time to let go of old sorrows and welcome new hopes of good fortune. There are Countdown Parities all over the city, and when the clock strikes midnight, you can join the crowds who head to the citys shrines and temples for the first visit of the New Year. The atmosphere at most shrines is festive, with food and lucky charms for sale.\n\n \n\nTo be in the center of the celebration in Paris, France, head to the Champs-Elysees. There are lots of cafes and clubs along the famous street where you can dine and dance while waiting for midnight. At midnight, the Eiffel Tower will light up as fireworks illuminate the sky. To celebrate with a smaller crowd, head to the plaza in front of Sacr-Coeur Basilica in Montmartre, the citys highest point. Youll have a view of the fireworks, and there are plenty of clubs and bars in the surrounding streets.\n\n \n\nIn Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, New Years Eve commonly referred to as Rveillon is second only to Carnival for glamorous fun. You can attend an elegant Rveillon party at one of the citys hotels or museums. Or, head to the beach at Copacabana to enjoy live music from multiple stages and see a massive fireworks display. Note that its traditional to wear white to this party, which attracts as many as two million people to the 2.5 miles of beachfront.\n\n \n\nAs always, all eyes will be on New York City as the famous New Years Eve Ball descends in Times Square just before midnight. While the live music and blizzard of confetti in Times Square are fantastic, there are celebrations and special performance across the city, from the New York Philharmonic at Lincoln Center to the Concert for Peace at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.\n\n \n\nTo make your arrangements for a global New Years Eve celebration, talk with your travel professional.","contentnoshortcodes":"New Years Eve is a truly worldwide event, and a great holiday to experience away from home. One of the worlds most iconic celebrations is in Sydney, Australia, which puts on a spectacular fireworks display in Sydney Harbor. Actually, there are two displays: a 9 p.m. show to accommodate families with young (or not-so-young) members who will fall asleep before midnight; and a show that starts at the stroke of 12 a.m. Theres a lot to see in the harbor before and between the fireworks, too, including demonstrations of aerial acrobatics and a parade of vessels illuminated by miles and miles of rope lights.\n\n \n\nFor a more exotic far eastern celebration, consider Tokyo, Japan. New Year is an important holiday here, a time to let go of old sorrows and welcome new hopes of good fortune. There are Countdown Parities all over the city, and when the clock strikes midnight, you can join the crowds who head to the citys shrines and temples for the first visit of the New Year. The atmosphere at most shrines is festive, with food and lucky charms for sale.\n\n \n\nTo be in the center of the celebration in Paris, France, head to the Champs-Elysees. There are lots of cafes and clubs along the famous street where you can dine and dance while waiting for midnight. At midnight, the Eiffel Tower will light up as fireworks illuminate the sky. To celebrate with a smaller crowd, head to the plaza in front of Sacr-Coeur Basilica in Montmartre, the citys highest point. Youll have a view of the fireworks, and there are plenty of clubs and bars in the surrounding streets.\n\n \n\nIn Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, New Years Eve commonly referred to as Rveillon is second only to Carnival for glamorous fun. You can attend an elegant Rveillon party at one of the citys hotels or museums. Or, head to the beach at Copacabana to enjoy live music from multiple stages and see a massive fireworks display. Note that its traditional to wear white to this party, which attracts as many as two million people to the 2.5 miles of beachfront.\n\n \n\nAs always, all eyes will be on New York City as the famous New Years Eve Ball descends in Times Square just before midnight. While the live music and blizzard of confetti in Times Square are fantastic, there are celebrations and special performance across the city, from the New York Philharmonic at Lincoln Center to the Concert for Peace at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.\n\n \n\nTo make your arrangements for a global New Years Eve celebration, talk with your travel professional.","numcomments":0,"author":"Tod Ganje","author_s":"http://travelingtod.areavoices.com/author/travelingtod/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-12-04T17:43:23Z","displaydate":"2012-12-04 12:43:23","displaymodified":"2012-12-04 12:43:23","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["New Year’s Eve Around the World","New Year’s Eve is a truly worldwide event, and a great holiday to experience away from home. One of the world’s most iconic celebrations is in Sydney, Australia, which puts on a spectacular fireworks display in Sydney Harbor. Actually, there are two displays: a 9 p.m. show to accommodate families with young (or not-so-young) members who will fall asleep before midnight; and a show that starts at the stroke of 12 a.m. There’s a lot to see in the harbor before and between the fireworks, too, including demonstrations of aerial acrobatics and a parade of vessels illuminated by miles and miles of rope lights.\n\n \n\nFor a more exotic far eastern celebration, consider Tokyo, Japan. New Year is an important holiday here, a time to let go of old sorrows and welcome new hopes of good fortune. There are “Countdown Parities” all over the city, and when the clock strikes midnight, you can join the crowds who head to the city’s shrines and temples for the first visit of the New Year. The atmosphere at most shrines is festive, with food and lucky charms for sale.\n\n \n\nTo be in the center of the celebration in Paris, France, head to the Champs-Elysees. There are lots of cafes and clubs along the famous street where you can dine and dance while waiting for midnight. At midnight, the Eiffel Tower will light up as fireworks illuminate the sky. To celebrate with a smaller crowd, head to the plaza in front of Sacré-Coeur Basilica in Montmartre, the city’s highest point. You’ll have a view of the fireworks, and there are plenty of clubs and bars in the surrounding streets.\n\n \n\nIn Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, New Year’s Eve – commonly referred to as Réveillon – is second only to Carnival for glamorous fun. You can attend an elegant Réveillon party at one of the city’s hotels or museums. Or, head to the beach at Copacabana to enjoy live music from multiple stages and see a massive fireworks display. Note that it’s traditional to wear white to this party, which attracts as many as two million people to the 2.5 miles of beachfront.\n\n \n\nAs always, all eyes will be on New York City as the famous New Year’s Eve Ball descends in Times Square just before midnight. While the live music and blizzard of confetti in Times Square are fantastic, there are celebrations and special performance across the city, from the New York Philharmonic at Lincoln Center to the Concert for Peace at the Cathedral of St. John the Divine.\n\n \n\nTo make your arrangements for a global New Year’s Eve celebration, talk with your travel professional.","Tod Ganje"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:exploreminnesota.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":126,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"exploreminnesota.areavoices.com/373","permalink":"http://exploreminnesota.areavoices.com/2012/05/23/explore-minnesota-concerts-performances-40/","blogid":"15958","blogdomain":"exploreminnesota.areavoices.com","hostname":"exploreminnesota.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Explore Minnesota Concerts & Performances","content":"May 23, 2012\n\nThis listing is brought to you by Explore Minnesota.\n\nTo match up these events with local lodgings, go to http://exploreminnesota.com/places-to-stay/index.aspx\n\n \n\nLMFAO with Far East Movement, The Quest Crew, Sidney Samson, & More at the Target Center in Minneapolis, May 25\nAvicii at the Target Center, May 26\nRodney Carrington at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel in Prior Lake, June 1\nWyatt Cenac at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul, June 1\nAlison Scott at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 2\nFeist at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater in Apple Valley, June 2\nStudio 4 Dancers present \"The Time of My Life\" at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, June 2 & 3\nRoger Waters: The Wall Live at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul in St. Paul, June 3\nChris Koza at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 8\nThe 7th Annual Spotlight Showcase at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, June 11\nBobcat Goldthwait with St. Vincent at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 15\nPenn & Teller at Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, June 15\nThe Blue Man Group at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, June 15-24\nT. Michael Rambo at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 16\nThe Global Warming Tour featuring Aerosmith & Cheap Trick at the Target Center, June 16\nJerry Jeff Walker at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 17\nKristin Chenoweth at the Historic State Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nUnder the Streetlamp at the Pantages Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nBruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 19\nBrandi Carlile at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 20\nFoster the People at the Target Center, June 22\nThe River's Edge Music Festival on Harriet Island in St. Paul, June 23 & 24\nTedeschi Trucks Band at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 24\nJohn Prine at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 29\nEmmylou Harris at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 28\nAmy Sedaris at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 30\nDavid Gray at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 1\nIdina Menzel at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 7\nChips Ahoy! & Ritz present AMERICAN IDOL LIVE! at the Target Center, July 9\nNeil Diamond Live In Concert at the Xcel Energy Center, July 11\nMarc Cohn at the Minesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 13\nFiona Apple at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 16\nLyle Lovett at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 21\nMerle Haggard & Kris Kristofferson at the Historic State Theatre, July 25\nThe Bodeans at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 27 & 28\nBig Time Summer Tour with Big Time Rush, Cody Simpson and Rachel Crow at the Target Center, July 28\nEnrique, JLO, Wisin & Yandel at the Target Center, August 1\nMary Chapin Carpenter at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 1\nIl Divo at the Target Center in Minneapolis, August 2\nDave Koz at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 3\nJeff Dunham at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel, August 3\nCrosby, Stills & Nash at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 6\nLast Summer on Earth Tour at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 7\nColdplay at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, August 10 & 11\nRufus Wainwright at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 11\nIl Volo at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 12\nTower of Power at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 15\nBrian Culbertson & David Sanborn: The Dream Tour at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, August 25\nThe B-52s at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 28\nThe Cedar Presents Amon Tobin at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 6\nAvicii at the Minneapolis Convention Center, September 7\nMetric at the Historic State Theatre, September 11\nBatman Live at the Xcel Energy Center, September 13-16\nThe Legend Of Zelda at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 22\nCarrie Underwood: The Blown Away Tour at the Target Center, September 27\nWanda Sykes at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 28\nNorah Jones at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, October 7\nDakota Valley Symphony - Afternoon at Pops: A Salute to John Williams at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, October 14\nCeltic Thunder at the Historic State Theatre, October 20\nDisney's Phineas and Ferb Live: The Best Live Tour Ever! at the Xcel Energy Center, October 21\nThe Red Hot Chili Peppers at the Target Center, October 30\nMadonna at the Xcel Energy Center, November 3 & 4\nDavid Sedaris at the Historic State Theatre, November 10\nStraight No Chaser at the Historic State Theatre, November 17\nA Don't Hug Me Christmas Carol at the New Century Theatre in Minneapolis, November 23-December 31\nAdvance Auto Parts Monster Jam at the Hubert H Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, December 1\nDakota Valley Symphony - Handel's Messiah at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, December 2\nThe Nutcracker Moscow Ballet Classique at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, December 7 & 8\nFor further information on any of these performances or events, contact Ticketmaster. 651/989-5151\n\nThis listing was brought to you by Explore Minnesota Tourism.\n\n ","rawcontent":"May 23, 2012\n\nThis listing is brought to you by Explore Minnesota.\n\nTo match up these events with local lodgings, go to http://exploreminnesota.com/places-to-stay/index.aspx\n\n \n\nLMFAO with Far East Movement, The Quest Crew, Sidney Samson, & More at the Target Center in Minneapolis, May 25\nAvicii at the Target Center, May 26\nRodney Carrington at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel in Prior Lake, June 1\nWyatt Cenac at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul, June 1\nAlison Scott at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 2\nFeist at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater in Apple Valley, June 2\nStudio 4 Dancers present \"The Time of My Life\" at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, June 2 & 3\nRoger Waters: The Wall Live at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul in St. Paul, June 3\nChris Koza at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 8\nThe 7th Annual Spotlight Showcase at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, June 11\nBobcat Goldthwait with St. Vincent at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 15\nPenn & Teller at Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, June 15\nThe Blue Man Group at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, June 15-24\nT. Michael Rambo at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 16\nThe Global Warming Tour featuring Aerosmith & Cheap Trick at the Target Center, June 16\nJerry Jeff Walker at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 17\nKristin Chenoweth at the Historic State Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nUnder the Streetlamp at the Pantages Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nBruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 19\nBrandi Carlile at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 20\nFoster the People at the Target Center, June 22\nThe River's Edge Music Festival on Harriet Island in St. Paul, June 23 & 24\nTedeschi Trucks Band at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 24\nJohn Prine at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 29\nEmmylou Harris at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 28\nAmy Sedaris at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 30\nDavid Gray at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 1\nIdina Menzel at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 7\nChips Ahoy! & Ritz present AMERICAN IDOL LIVE! at the Target Center, July 9\nNeil Diamond Live In Concert at the Xcel Energy Center, July 11\nMarc Cohn at the Minesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 13\nFiona Apple at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 16\nLyle Lovett at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 21\nMerle Haggard & Kris Kristofferson at the Historic State Theatre, July 25\nThe Bodeans at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 27 & 28\nBig Time Summer Tour with Big Time Rush, Cody Simpson and Rachel Crow at the Target Center, July 28\nEnrique, JLO, Wisin & Yandel at the Target Center, August 1\nMary Chapin Carpenter at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 1\nIl Divo at the Target Center in Minneapolis, August 2\nDave Koz at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 3\nJeff Dunham at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel, August 3\nCrosby, Stills & Nash at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 6\nLast Summer on Earth Tour at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 7\nColdplay at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, August 10 & 11\nRufus Wainwright at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 11\nIl Volo at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 12\nTower of Power at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 15\nBrian Culbertson & David Sanborn: The Dream Tour at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, August 25\nThe B-52s at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 28\nThe Cedar Presents Amon Tobin at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 6\nAvicii at the Minneapolis Convention Center, September 7\nMetric at the Historic State Theatre, September 11\nBatman Live at the Xcel Energy Center, September 13-16\nThe Legend Of Zelda at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 22\nCarrie Underwood: The Blown Away Tour at the Target Center, September 27\nWanda Sykes at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 28\nNorah Jones at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, October 7\nDakota Valley Symphony - Afternoon at Pops: A Salute to John Williams at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, October 14\nCeltic Thunder at the Historic State Theatre, October 20\nDisney's Phineas and Ferb Live: The Best Live Tour Ever! at the Xcel Energy Center, October 21\nThe Red Hot Chili Peppers at the Target Center, October 30\nMadonna at the Xcel Energy Center, November 3 & 4\nDavid Sedaris at the Historic State Theatre, November 10\nStraight No Chaser at the Historic State Theatre, November 17\nA Don't Hug Me Christmas Carol at the New Century Theatre in Minneapolis, November 23-December 31\nAdvance Auto Parts Monster Jam at the Hubert H Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, December 1\nDakota Valley Symphony - Handel's Messiah at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, December 2\nThe Nutcracker Moscow Ballet Classique at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, December 7 & 8\nFor further information on any of these performances or events, contact Ticketmaster. 651/989-5151\n\nThis listing was brought to you by Explore Minnesota Tourism.\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"May 23, 2012\n\nThis listing is brought to you by Explore Minnesota.\n\nTo match up these events with local lodgings, go to http://exploreminnesota.com/places-to-stay/index.aspx\n\n \n\nLMFAO with Far East Movement, The Quest Crew, Sidney Samson, & More at the Target Center in Minneapolis, May 25\nAvicii at the Target Center, May 26\nRodney Carrington at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel in Prior Lake, June 1\nWyatt Cenac at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul, June 1\nAlison Scott at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 2\nFeist at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater in Apple Valley, June 2\nStudio 4 Dancers present \"The Time of My Life\" at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, June 2 & 3\nRoger Waters: The Wall Live at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul in St. Paul, June 3\nChris Koza at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 8\nThe 7th Annual Spotlight Showcase at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, June 11\nBobcat Goldthwait with St. Vincent at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 15\nPenn & Teller at Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, June 15\nThe Blue Man Group at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, June 15-24\nT. Michael Rambo at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 16\nThe Global Warming Tour featuring Aerosmith & Cheap Trick at the Target Center, June 16\nJerry Jeff Walker at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 17\nKristin Chenoweth at the Historic State Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nUnder the Streetlamp at the Pantages Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nBruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 19\nBrandi Carlile at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 20\nFoster the People at the Target Center, June 22\nThe River's Edge Music Festival on Harriet Island in St. Paul, June 23 & 24\nTedeschi Trucks Band at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 24\nJohn Prine at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 29\nEmmylou Harris at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 28\nAmy Sedaris at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 30\nDavid Gray at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 1\nIdina Menzel at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 7\nChips Ahoy! & Ritz present AMERICAN IDOL LIVE! at the Target Center, July 9\nNeil Diamond Live In Concert at the Xcel Energy Center, July 11\nMarc Cohn at the Minesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 13\nFiona Apple at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 16\nLyle Lovett at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 21\nMerle Haggard & Kris Kristofferson at the Historic State Theatre, July 25\nThe Bodeans at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 27 & 28\nBig Time Summer Tour with Big Time Rush, Cody Simpson and Rachel Crow at the Target Center, July 28\nEnrique, JLO, Wisin & Yandel at the Target Center, August 1\nMary Chapin Carpenter at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 1\nIl Divo at the Target Center in Minneapolis, August 2\nDave Koz at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 3\nJeff Dunham at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel, August 3\nCrosby, Stills & Nash at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 6\nLast Summer on Earth Tour at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 7\nColdplay at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, August 10 & 11\nRufus Wainwright at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 11\nIl Volo at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 12\nTower of Power at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 15\nBrian Culbertson & David Sanborn: The Dream Tour at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, August 25\nThe B-52s at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 28\nThe Cedar Presents Amon Tobin at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 6\nAvicii at the Minneapolis Convention Center, September 7\nMetric at the Historic State Theatre, September 11\nBatman Live at the Xcel Energy Center, September 13-16\nThe Legend Of Zelda at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 22\nCarrie Underwood: The Blown Away Tour at the Target Center, September 27\nWanda Sykes at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 28\nNorah Jones at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, October 7\nDakota Valley Symphony - Afternoon at Pops: A Salute to John Williams at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, October 14\nCeltic Thunder at the Historic State Theatre, October 20\nDisney's Phineas and Ferb Live: The Best Live Tour Ever! at the Xcel Energy Center, October 21\nThe Red Hot Chili Peppers at the Target Center, October 30\nMadonna at the Xcel Energy Center, November 3 & 4\nDavid Sedaris at the Historic State Theatre, November 10\nStraight No Chaser at the Historic State Theatre, November 17\nA Don't Hug Me Christmas Carol at the New Century Theatre in Minneapolis, November 23-December 31\nAdvance Auto Parts Monster Jam at the Hubert H Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, December 1\nDakota Valley Symphony - Handel's Messiah at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, December 2\nThe Nutcracker Moscow Ballet Classique at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, December 7 & 8\nFor further information on any of these performances or events, contact Ticketmaster. 651/989-5151\n\nThis listing was brought to you by Explore Minnesota Tourism.\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Chuck Lennon, Explore Minnesota Tourism-twitter @mntourism","author_s":"http://exploreminnesota.areavoices.com/author/chucklennon/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-05-23T14:32:21Z","displaydate":"2012-05-23 14:32:21","displaymodified":"2012-05-23 14:32:21","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Explore Minnesota Concerts & Performances","May 23, 2012\n\nThis listing is brought to you by Explore Minnesota.\n\nTo match up these events with local lodgings, go to http://exploreminnesota.com/places-to-stay/index.aspx\n\n \n\nLMFAO with Far East Movement, The Quest Crew, Sidney Samson, & More at the Target Center in Minneapolis, May 25\nAvicii at the Target Center, May 26\nRodney Carrington at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel in Prior Lake, June 1\nWyatt Cenac at the Fitzgerald Theater in St. Paul, June 1\nAlison Scott at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 2\nFeist at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater in Apple Valley, June 2\nStudio 4 Dancers present \"The Time of My Life\" at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, June 2 & 3\nRoger Waters: The Wall Live at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul in St. Paul, June 3\nChris Koza at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 8\nThe 7th Annual Spotlight Showcase at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, June 11\nBobcat Goldthwait with St. Vincent at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 15\nPenn & Teller at Mystic Lake Casino Hotel, June 15\nThe Blue Man Group at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, June 15-24\nT. Michael Rambo at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 16\nThe Global Warming Tour featuring Aerosmith & Cheap Trick at the Target Center, June 16\nJerry Jeff Walker at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 17\nKristin Chenoweth at the Historic State Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nUnder the Streetlamp at the Pantages Theatre in Minneapolis, June 17\nBruce Hornsby & the Noisemakers at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 19\nBrandi Carlile at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 20\nFoster the People at the Target Center, June 22\nThe River's Edge Music Festival on Harriet Island in St. Paul, June 23 & 24\nTedeschi Trucks Band at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 24\nJohn Prine at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 29\nEmmylou Harris at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, June 28\nAmy Sedaris at the Fitzgerald Theater, June 30\nDavid Gray at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 1\nIdina Menzel at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 7\nChips Ahoy! & Ritz present AMERICAN IDOL LIVE! at the Target Center, July 9\nNeil Diamond Live In Concert at the Xcel Energy Center, July 11\nMarc Cohn at the Minesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 13\nFiona Apple at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, July 16\nLyle Lovett at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 21\nMerle Haggard & Kris Kristofferson at the Historic State Theatre, July 25\nThe Bodeans at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, July 27 & 28\nBig Time Summer Tour with Big Time Rush, Cody Simpson and Rachel Crow at the Target Center, July 28\nEnrique, JLO, Wisin & Yandel at the Target Center, August 1\nMary Chapin Carpenter at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 1\nIl Divo at the Target Center in Minneapolis, August 2\nDave Koz at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 3\nJeff Dunham at Mystic Lake Casino & Hotel, August 3\nCrosby, Stills & Nash at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 6\nLast Summer on Earth Tour at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 7\nColdplay at the Xcel Energy Center in St. Paul, August 10 & 11\nRufus Wainwright at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 11\nIl Volo at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, August 12\nTower of Power at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 15\nBrian Culbertson & David Sanborn: The Dream Tour at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, August 25\nThe B-52s at the Minnesota Zoo Amphitheater, August 28\nThe Cedar Presents Amon Tobin at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 6\nAvicii at the Minneapolis Convention Center, September 7\nMetric at the Historic State Theatre, September 11\nBatman Live at the Xcel Energy Center, September 13-16\nThe Legend Of Zelda at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 22\nCarrie Underwood: The Blown Away Tour at the Target Center, September 27\nWanda Sykes at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, September 28\nNorah Jones at the Historic Orpheum Theatre, October 7\nDakota Valley Symphony - Afternoon at Pops: A Salute to John Williams at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, October 14\nCeltic Thunder at the Historic State Theatre, October 20\nDisney's Phineas and Ferb Live: The Best Live Tour Ever! at the Xcel Energy Center, October 21\nThe Red Hot Chili Peppers at the Target Center, October 30\nMadonna at the Xcel Energy Center, November 3 & 4\nDavid Sedaris at the Historic State Theatre, November 10\nStraight No Chaser at the Historic State Theatre, November 17\nA Don't Hug Me Christmas Carol at the New Century Theatre in Minneapolis, November 23-December 31\nAdvance Auto Parts Monster Jam at the Hubert H Humphrey Metrodome in Minneapolis, December 1\nDakota Valley Symphony - Handel's Messiah at the Burnsville Performing Arts Center, December 2\nThe Nutcracker Moscow Ballet Classique at the Historic Orpheum Theatre in Minneapolis, December 7 & 8\nFor further information on any of these performances or events, contact Ticketmaster. 651/989-5151\n\nThis listing was brought to you by Explore Minnesota Tourism.\n\n ","Chuck Lennon, Explore Minnesota Tourism-twitter @mntourism"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:productrecalls.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":400,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"productrecalls.areavoices.com/2042","permalink":"http://productrecalls.areavoices.com/2013/03/15/u-s-divers-recalls-youth-snorkeling-mask-sets/","blogid":"15964","blogdomain":"productrecalls.areavoices.com","hostname":"productrecalls.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"U.S. Divers Recalls Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets","content":"U.S. Divers Recalls Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets Due to Laceration Hazard; Sold Exclusively at Costco\n\nConsumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.\n\nRecall date: March 07, 2013\n\nRecall number: 13-133\n\nName of product: Martinique LX Jr. Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets\n\nHazard: Notches in the tempered glass lens on the mask can break under certain water pressure, posing a laceration hazard to the user.\n\nRemedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled masks and contact U.S. Divers for a replacement mask.\n\nConsumer Contact: U.S. Divers; toll-free at (888) 606-6162 anytime, or online atwww.usdivers.com and click on \"Recall Notice\" for more information.\n\nUnits: About 44,000 units\n\nPhotos are available at: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/US-Divers-Recalls-Youth-Snorkeling-Mask-Sets/\n\nDescription: This recall involves Martinique Jr. single paned, tempered glass youth snorkeling masks sold in a set with snorkel and fins. The masks feature a silicone face skirt, strap and adjustable buckles. The mask is blue with a silver accent piece that frames the tempered glass lens. The U.S. Divers logo is on the upper bridge of the mask as well as inset on the tempered glass lens. The lens is also labeled as tempered. The buckles are each printed with the U.S. Divers \"wave\" logo.\n\nIncidents/Injuries: The firm has received eight reports of the lens cracking or breaking, including four reports of cuts and scratches to the face.\n\nSold exclusively at: Costco Wholesale stores nationwide from November 2010 through July 2011 for about $30.\n\nImporter: Aqua Lung Inc. dba U.S. Divers, of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufacturer: Aqua Lung Inc., of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufactured in: Thailand","rawcontent":"U.S. Divers Recalls Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets Due to Laceration Hazard; Sold Exclusively at Costco\n\nConsumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.\n\nRecall date: March 07, 2013\n\nRecall number: 13-133\n\nName of product: Martinique LX Jr. Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets\n\nHazard: Notches in the tempered glass lens on the mask can break under certain water pressure, posing a laceration hazard to the user.\n\nRemedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled masks and contact U.S. Divers for a replacement mask.\n\nConsumer Contact: U.S. Divers; toll-free at(888) 606-6162anytime, or online atwww.usdivers.comand click on \"Recall Notice\" for more information.\n\nUnits: About 44,000 units\n\nPhotos are available at:http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/US-Divers-Recalls-Youth-Snorkeling-Mask-Sets/\n\nDescription: This recall involves Martinique Jr. single paned, tempered glass youth snorkeling masks sold in a set with snorkel and fins. The masks feature a silicone face skirt, strap and adjustable buckles. The mask is blue with a silver accent piece that frames the tempered glass lens. The U.S. Divers logo is on the upper bridge of the mask as well as inset on the tempered glass lens. The lens is also labeled as tempered. The buckles are each printed with the U.S. Divers \"wave\" logo.\n\nIncidents/Injuries: The firm has received eight reports of the lens cracking or breaking, including four reports of cuts and scratches to the face.\n\nSold exclusively at: Costco Wholesale stores nationwide from November 2010 through July 2011 for about $30.\n\nImporter: Aqua Lung Inc. dba U.S. Divers, of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufacturer: Aqua Lung Inc., of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufactured in: Thailand","contentnoshortcodes":"U.S. Divers Recalls Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets Due to Laceration Hazard; Sold Exclusively at Costco\n\nConsumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.\n\nRecall date: March 07, 2013\n\nRecall number: 13-133\n\nName of product: Martinique LX Jr. Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets\n\nHazard: Notches in the tempered glass lens on the mask can break under certain water pressure, posing a laceration hazard to the user.\n\nRemedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled masks and contact U.S. Divers for a replacement mask.\n\nConsumer Contact: U.S. Divers; toll-free at(888) 606-6162anytime, or online atwww.usdivers.comand click on \"Recall Notice\" for more information.\n\nUnits: About 44,000 units\n\nPhotos are available at:http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/US-Divers-Recalls-Youth-Snorkeling-Mask-Sets/\n\nDescription: This recall involves Martinique Jr. single paned, tempered glass youth snorkeling masks sold in a set with snorkel and fins. The masks feature a silicone face skirt, strap and adjustable buckles. The mask is blue with a silver accent piece that frames the tempered glass lens. The U.S. Divers logo is on the upper bridge of the mask as well as inset on the tempered glass lens. The lens is also labeled as tempered. The buckles are each printed with the U.S. Divers \"wave\" logo.\n\nIncidents/Injuries: The firm has received eight reports of the lens cracking or breaking, including four reports of cuts and scratches to the face.\n\nSold exclusively at: Costco Wholesale stores nationwide from November 2010 through July 2011 for about $30.\n\nImporter: Aqua Lung Inc. dba U.S. Divers, of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufacturer: Aqua Lung Inc., of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufactured in: Thailand","numcomments":0,"author":"bethkern","author_s":"http://productrecalls.areavoices.com/author/bethkern/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-03-15T16:41:45Z","displaydate":"2013-03-15 16:41:45","displaymodified":"2013-03-15 16:41:45","categories":["Sports and Recreation"],"spell":["U.S. Divers Recalls Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets","U.S. Divers Recalls Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets Due to Laceration Hazard; Sold Exclusively at Costco\n\nConsumers should stop using this product unless otherwise instructed. It is illegal to resell or attempt to resell a recalled consumer product.\n\nRecall date: March 07, 2013\n\nRecall number: 13-133\n\nName of product: Martinique LX Jr. Youth Snorkeling Mask Sets\n\nHazard: Notches in the tempered glass lens on the mask can break under certain water pressure, posing a laceration hazard to the user.\n\nRemedy: Consumers should immediately stop using the recalled masks and contact U.S. Divers for a replacement mask.\n\nConsumer Contact: U.S. Divers; toll-free at (888) 606-6162 anytime, or online atwww.usdivers.com and click on \"Recall Notice\" for more information.\n\nUnits: About 44,000 units\n\nPhotos are available at: http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2013/US-Divers-Recalls-Youth-Snorkeling-Mask-Sets/\n\nDescription: This recall involves Martinique Jr. single paned, tempered glass youth snorkeling masks sold in a set with snorkel and fins. The masks feature a silicone face skirt, strap and adjustable buckles. The mask is blue with a silver accent piece that frames the tempered glass lens. The U.S. Divers logo is on the upper bridge of the mask as well as inset on the tempered glass lens. The lens is also labeled as tempered. The buckles are each printed with the U.S. Divers \"wave\" logo.\n\nIncidents/Injuries: The firm has received eight reports of the lens cracking or breaking, including four reports of cuts and scratches to the face.\n\nSold exclusively at: Costco Wholesale stores nationwide from November 2010 through July 2011 for about $30.\n\nImporter: Aqua Lung Inc. dba U.S. Divers, of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufacturer: Aqua Lung Inc., of Vista, Calif.\n\nManufactured in: Thailand","bethkern"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:running.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":54,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"running.areavoices.com/493","permalink":"http://running.areavoices.com/contact/","blogid":"15195","blogdomain":"running.areavoices.com","hostname":"running.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"contact","content":"Here I am.","rawcontent":"Here I am.","contentnoshortcodes":"Here I am.","numcomments":0,"author":"J. Shane Mercer","author_s":"http://running.areavoices.com/author/shane/","type":"page","publishtime":"2014-03-14T01:27:19Z","displaydate":"2014-03-13 20:27:19","displaymodified":"2014-03-13 20:27:19","spell":["contact","Here I am.","J. Shane Mercer"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:farside.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":2197,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"farside.areavoices.com/92965","permalink":"http://farside.areavoices.com/2013/12/28/six-year-journey-ends/","blogid":"378","blogdomain":"farside.areavoices.com","hostname":"farside.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Six Year Journey Ends","content":"Six years ago I began this blogging journey.  It has been an experience…good, bad, sad, happy and everything inbetween.  I have met many wonderful bloggers from all over the world.  It has been a pleasure.\n\nI write at night instead of watching TV, I use a program called Live Writer.  I don’t have an index of my blogs … sometimes I think I may be re telling a story I already told.  I am getting old what do you expect?\n\nWhen I began blogging we still had our Greenhouse business ( I closed it in the winter of 2008 a very hard decision), Far Guy had just been diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia, Chance was three years old, I had a 2 megapixel camera and I was younger.\n\nWhy Blog?  To leave some small part of me behind for my Grands.  Just like a diary and they are in it!  Some things will fade in their memories as they get older and they may have some questions about their family history…well they might find that info in the blog.\n\nSelfishly I also wanted to collect enough photos and blooming information about the wildflowers in our area to write a book.  The blog was a great place to collect some of that information.  It is also a good place to document the things that happen in our area.\n\nLocally the blog is carried by Area Voices in a difficult format (Wordpress), the publishing company has difficult rules for me to follow…I am limited to the number of photos I can use. It is a free platform and they call all the shots.\n\nMy time with them has come to an end after six years.   Readers can always find me HERE or just Google Far Side of Fifty and you will find me. Thanks for reading!","rawcontent":"Six years ago I began this blogging journey. It has been an experiencegood, bad, sad, happyand everything inbetween. I have met many wonderful bloggers from all over the world. It has been a pleasure.\n\nI write at night instead of watching TV, I use a program called Live Writer. I dont have an index of my blogs sometimes I think I may be re telling a story I already told. I am getting old what do you expect?\n\nWhen I began blogging we still had our Greenhouse business ( I closed it in the winter of 2008 a very hard decision), Far Guy had just been diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia, Chance was three years old, I had a 2 megapixel camera and I was younger.\n\nWhy Blog? To leave some small part of me behind for my Grands. Just like a diary and they are in it! Some things will fade in their memories as they get older and they may have some questions about their family historywell they might find that info in the blog.\n\nSelfishly I also wanted to collect enough photos and blooming information about the wildflowers in our area to write a book. The blog was a great place to collect some of that information. It is also a good place to document the things that happen in our area.\n\nLocally the blog is carried by Area Voices in a difficult format (Wordpress), the publishing company has difficult rules for me to followI am limited tothe number of photos I can use. It is a free platform and they call all the shots.\n\nMy time with them has come to an end after six years. Readers can always find me HERE or just Google Far Side of Fifty and you will find me. Thanks for reading!","contentnoshortcodes":"Six years ago I began this blogging journey. It has been an experiencegood, bad, sad, happyand everything inbetween. I have met many wonderful bloggers from all over the world. It has been a pleasure.\n\nI write at night instead of watching TV, I use a program called Live Writer. I dont have an index of my blogs sometimes I think I may be re telling a story I already told. I am getting old what do you expect?\n\nWhen I began blogging we still had our Greenhouse business ( I closed it in the winter of 2008 a very hard decision), Far Guy had just been diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia, Chance was three years old, I had a 2 megapixel camera and I was younger.\n\nWhy Blog? To leave some small part of me behind for my Grands. Just like a diary and they are in it! Some things will fade in their memories as they get older and they may have some questions about their family historywell they might find that info in the blog.\n\nSelfishly I also wanted to collect enough photos and blooming information about the wildflowers in our area to write a book. The blog was a great place to collect some of that information. It is also a good place to document the things that happen in our area.\n\nLocally the blog is carried by Area Voices in a difficult format (Wordpress), the publishing company has difficult rules for me to followI am limited tothe number of photos I can use. It is a free platform and they call all the shots.\n\nMy time with them has come to an end after six years. Readers can always find me HERE or just Google Far Side of Fifty and you will find me. Thanks for reading!","numcomments":0,"author":"farside","author_s":"http://farside.areavoices.com/author/farside/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-12-28T12:05:33Z","displaydate":"2013-12-28 06:05:33","displaymodified":"2013-12-27 20:07:44","categories":["blog anniversary"],"spell":["Six Year Journey Ends","Six years ago I began this blogging journey.  It has been an experience…good, bad, sad, happy and everything inbetween.  I have met many wonderful bloggers from all over the world.  It has been a pleasure.\n\nI write at night instead of watching TV, I use a program called Live Writer.  I don’t have an index of my blogs … sometimes I think I may be re telling a story I already told.  I am getting old what do you expect?\n\nWhen I began blogging we still had our Greenhouse business ( I closed it in the winter of 2008 a very hard decision), Far Guy had just been diagnosed with Trigeminal Neuralgia, Chance was three years old, I had a 2 megapixel camera and I was younger.\n\nWhy Blog?  To leave some small part of me behind for my Grands.  Just like a diary and they are in it!  Some things will fade in their memories as they get older and they may have some questions about their family history…well they might find that info in the blog.\n\nSelfishly I also wanted to collect enough photos and blooming information about the wildflowers in our area to write a book.  The blog was a great place to collect some of that information.  It is also a good place to document the things that happen in our area.\n\nLocally the blog is carried by Area Voices in a difficult format (Wordpress), the publishing company has difficult rules for me to follow…I am limited to the number of photos I can use. It is a free platform and they call all the shots.\n\nMy time with them has come to an end after six years.   Readers can always find me HERE or just Google Far Side of Fifty and you will find me. Thanks for reading!","farside"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:ridgewater.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":71,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"ridgewater.areavoices.com/744","permalink":"http://ridgewater.areavoices.com/2013/10/08/loud-rumbling-booms/","blogid":"4988","blogdomain":"ridgewater.areavoices.com","hostname":"ridgewater.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Loud, rumbling BOOMS","content":"September 17, 2013\n\nOn my way to the market this morning, I heard them in the distance--loud, rumbling booms that I had been warned about.  Not thunder, though thunder would have been plausible during this most unusual rainy stretch.  Instead, I heard Soviet-era bombs, left over from the Cold War, detonating just southwest of Pereyaslav.  Every Tuesday, this ritual commences and subsides in about an hour's time, like clockwork, I have been told.  Now that the distant rumbling is gone,, only the sounds of everyday life here remain: dogs bantering back and forth, a goat negotiating loudly his way to high grasses, women chattering away on the corner, workers pounding water pipes in a nearby trench, my heart beating in rhythm with this country so far removed from my home.","rawcontent":"September 17, 2013\n\nOn my way to the market this morning, I heard them in the distance--loud, rumbling booms that I had been warned about. Not thunder, though thunder would have been plausible during this most unusual rainy stretch. Instead, I heard Soviet-era bombs, left over from the Cold War, detonating just southwest of Pereyaslav. Every Tuesday, this ritual commences and subsides in about an hour's time, like clockwork, I have been told. Now that the distant rumbling is gone,, only the sounds of everyday life here remain: dogs bantering back and forth, a goat negotiating loudly his way to high grasses, women chattering away on the corner, workers pounding water pipes in a nearby trench, my heart beating in rhythm with this country so far removed from my home.","contentnoshortcodes":"September 17, 2013\n\nOn my way to the market this morning, I heard them in the distance--loud, rumbling booms that I had been warned about. Not thunder, though thunder would have been plausible during this most unusual rainy stretch. Instead, I heard Soviet-era bombs, left over from the Cold War, detonating just southwest of Pereyaslav. Every Tuesday, this ritual commences and subsides in about an hour's time, like clockwork, I have been told. Now that the distant rumbling is gone,, only the sounds of everyday life here remain: dogs bantering back and forth, a goat negotiating loudly his way to high grasses, women chattering away on the corner, workers pounding water pipes in a nearby trench, my heart beating in rhythm with this country so far removed from my home.","numcomments":0,"author":"Ridgewater Voices","author_s":"http://ridgewater.areavoices.com/author/ridgewatervoices/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-10-08T17:00:38Z","displaydate":"2013-10-08 12:00:38","displaymodified":"2013-10-08 12:00:38","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Loud, rumbling BOOMS","September 17, 2013\n\nOn my way to the market this morning, I heard them in the distance--loud, rumbling booms that I had been warned about.  Not thunder, though thunder would have been plausible during this most unusual rainy stretch.  Instead, I heard Soviet-era bombs, left over from the Cold War, detonating just southwest of Pereyaslav.  Every Tuesday, this ritual commences and subsides in about an hour's time, like clockwork, I have been told.  Now that the distant rumbling is gone,, only the sounds of everyday life here remain: dogs bantering back and forth, a goat negotiating loudly his way to high grasses, women chattering away on the corner, workers pounding water pipes in a nearby trench, my heart beating in rhythm with this country so far removed from my home.","Ridgewater Voices"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:repbrucevogel.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":142,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"repbrucevogel.areavoices.com/191","permalink":"http://repbrucevogel.areavoices.com/2013/05/08/tax-the-middle-class/","blogid":"17984","blogdomain":"repbrucevogel.areavoices.com","hostname":"repbrucevogel.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Tax the middle class","content":"\"Under the House Democrat Tax bill, 60 percent of people in the middle income tax bracket will see an income tax increase.\" And this is from the party that campaigned on helping the middle class. When all is said and done, this session, they will have done great damage to the struggling middle class!\n","rawcontent":"\"Under the House Democrat Tax bill, 60 percent of people in the middle income tax bracket will see an income tax increase.\" And this is from the party that campaigned on helping the middle class. When all is said and done, this session, they will have done great damage to the struggling middle class!\n","contentnoshortcodes":"\"Under the House Democrat Tax bill, 60 percent of people in the middle income tax bracket will see an income tax increase.\" And this is from the party that campaigned on helping the middle class. When all is said and done, this session, they will have done great damage to the struggling middle class!\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Bruce Vogel","author_s":"http://repbrucevogel.areavoices.com/author/repbrucevogel/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-05-08T15:54:35Z","displaydate":"2013-05-08 15:54:35","displaymodified":"2013-05-08 15:54:35","tags":["middle class","Taxes"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Tax the middle class","\"Under the House Democrat Tax bill, 60 percent of people in the middle income tax bracket will see an income tax increase.\" And this is from the party that campaigned on helping the middle class. When all is said and done, this session, they will have done great damage to the struggling middle class!\n","Bruce Vogel"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:family.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":163,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"family.areavoices.com/1196","permalink":"http://family.areavoices.com/2014/07/22/safe-kids-grand-forks-talks-bike-helmets/","blogid":"1354","blogdomain":"family.areavoices.com","hostname":"family.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Safe Kids Grand Forks Talks Bike Helmets","content":"Summer is in full swing and kids are wheeling their bikes out in the nice weather. It is important for both parents and children to remember to wear their helmets at all times when riding a bike. Helmets are 85% effective in reducing head injuries. Head injuries can cause life altering injuries, disabilities, or even death. It is important for parents to set the example and wear helmets when riding, not just as a role model for children, but for their own protection.\n\nHere are some injury statistics concerning wheeled sports activities:\n\n\tOn average over 80 children 14 and under are killed in cycle-related incidents.\n\tOver 200,000 children are injured in cycle-related crashes each year.\n\tEach year, over 60,000 children 14 and under are injured while using skateboards, inline skates or scooters.\n\tHead-injury is the leading cause of wheeled sports-related deaths and the most important determinant of permanent disability after a crash.\n\nHere's the good news:\n\n\tSince 1988, bicycle injury deaths have decreased by 78%.\n\tNationwide, the use of wheeled sports helmets by children has increased from 15% to nearly 45%.\n\tBicycle helmets have been proven to decrease the risk of a brain injury by almost 90%.\n\nWearing a helmet for wheeled sports is the single most effective way to prevent serious injury or death.\n\n\n\nThis is a bicycle helmet. If you fall off your bike, you are most likely to hit the side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head. It is for bike riding only – it should not be used for any other wheeled sports, as it does not provide adequate protection!\n\n\n\nThis is a multi-sport helmet. It can be used for all non-motorized wheeled sports (inline skating, skateboarding, scooter, bicycling). If you fall when doing some of these activities, you are most likely to hit the back, side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head.\n\n\n\nThis is a toddler helmet. It is usually used by children who ride on tricycles as they tend to tip over backwards and thus need additional protection at the base of the brain. This helmet looks a lot like a multi-sport helmet.\n\nIf you would like to purchase bike helmets at a reduced price, Safe Kids Grand Forks has two types of helmets available for both adults and children.\n\nBike helmets are available for $8, and are to be used exclusively on bikes.\n\nMulti-sport helmets are also available, which can be used for skateboarding, biking, rollerblading, and on scooters. The multi-sport helmets cost $12 each.\n\nBoth bike and multi-sport helmets come in a variety of colors.\n\nFor more information, contact Safe Kids Grand Forks at safekids@altru.org. Altru Health System is proud to serve as the lead agency for Safe Kids Grand Forks.\n\nIf you would like to receive email notification when our new posts are available, please email jwangen@altru.org. Asked to be added to our notification list for the Area Voices blog and/or Safe Kids quarterly newsletter.\n\n","rawcontent":"Summer is in full swing and kids are wheeling their bikes out in the nice weather. It is important for both parents and children to remember to wear their helmets at all times when riding a bike. Helmets are 85% effective in reducing head injuries. Head injuries can cause life altering injuries, disabilities, or even death. It is important for parents to set the example and wear helmets when riding, not just as a role model for children, but for their own protection.\n\nHere are some injury statistics concerning wheeled sports activities:\n\nOn average over 80 children 14 and under are killed in cycle-related incidents.\nOver 200,000 children are injured in cycle-related crashes each year.\nEach year, over 60,000 children 14 and under are injured while using skateboards, inline skates or scooters.\nHead-injury is the leading cause of wheeled sports-related deaths and the most important determinant of permanent disability after a crash.\n\nHere's the good news:\n\nSince 1988, bicycle injury deaths have decreased by 78%.\nNationwide, the use of wheeled sports helmets by children has increased from 15% to nearly 45%.\nBicycle helmets have been proven to decrease the risk of a brain injury by almost 90%.\n\nWearing a helmet for wheeled sports is the single most effective way to prevent serious injury or death.\n\n\n\nThis is a bicycle helmet. If you fall off your bike, you are most likely to hit the side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head. It is for bike riding only it should not be used for any other wheeled sports, as it does not provide adequate protection!\n\n\n\nThis is a multi-sport helmet. It can be used for all non-motorized wheeled sports (inline skating, skateboarding, scooter, bicycling). If you fall when doing some of these activities, you are most likely to hit the back, side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head.\n\n\n\nThis is a toddler helmet. It is usually used by children who ride on tricycles as they tend to tip over backwards and thus need additional protection at the base of the brain. This helmet looks a lot like a multi-sport helmet.\n\nIf you would like to purchase bike helmets at a reduced price, Safe Kids Grand Forks has two types of helmets available for both adults and children.\n\nBike helmets are available for $8, and are to be used exclusively on bikes.\n\nMulti-sport helmets are also available, which can be used for skateboarding, biking, rollerblading, and on scooters. The multi-sport helmets cost $12 each.\n\nBoth bike and multi-sport helmets come in a variety of colors.\n\nFor more information, contact Safe Kids Grand Forks at safekids@altru.org. Altru Health System is proud to serve as the lead agency for Safe Kids Grand Forks.\n\nIf you would like to receive email notification when our new posts are available, please email jwangen@altru.org. Asked to be added to our notification list for the Area Voices blog and/or Safe Kids quarterly newsletter.\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"Summer is in full swing and kids are wheeling their bikes out in the nice weather. It is important for both parents and children to remember to wear their helmets at all times when riding a bike. Helmets are 85% effective in reducing head injuries. Head injuries can cause life altering injuries, disabilities, or even death. It is important for parents to set the example and wear helmets when riding, not just as a role model for children, but for their own protection.\n\nHere are some injury statistics concerning wheeled sports activities:\n\nOn average over 80 children 14 and under are killed in cycle-related incidents.\nOver 200,000 children are injured in cycle-related crashes each year.\nEach year, over 60,000 children 14 and under are injured while using skateboards, inline skates or scooters.\nHead-injury is the leading cause of wheeled sports-related deaths and the most important determinant of permanent disability after a crash.\n\nHere's the good news:\n\nSince 1988, bicycle injury deaths have decreased by 78%.\nNationwide, the use of wheeled sports helmets by children has increased from 15% to nearly 45%.\nBicycle helmets have been proven to decrease the risk of a brain injury by almost 90%.\n\nWearing a helmet for wheeled sports is the single most effective way to prevent serious injury or death.\n\n\n\nThis is a bicycle helmet. If you fall off your bike, you are most likely to hit the side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head. It is for bike riding only it should not be used for any other wheeled sports, as it does not provide adequate protection!\n\n\n\nThis is a multi-sport helmet. It can be used for all non-motorized wheeled sports (inline skating, skateboarding, scooter, bicycling). If you fall when doing some of these activities, you are most likely to hit the back, side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head.\n\n\n\nThis is a toddler helmet. It is usually used by children who ride on tricycles as they tend to tip over backwards and thus need additional protection at the base of the brain. This helmet looks a lot like a multi-sport helmet.\n\nIf you would like to purchase bike helmets at a reduced price, Safe Kids Grand Forks has two types of helmets available for both adults and children.\n\nBike helmets are available for $8, and are to be used exclusively on bikes.\n\nMulti-sport helmets are also available, which can be used for skateboarding, biking, rollerblading, and on scooters. The multi-sport helmets cost $12 each.\n\nBoth bike and multi-sport helmets come in a variety of colors.\n\nFor more information, contact Safe Kids Grand Forks at safekids@altru.org. Altru Health System is proud to serve as the lead agency for Safe Kids Grand Forks.\n\nIf you would like to receive email notification when our new posts are available, please email jwangen@altru.org. Asked to be added to our notification list for the Area Voices blog and/or Safe Kids quarterly newsletter.\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"safekids","author_s":"http://family.areavoices.com/author/safekids/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-22T13:46:16Z","displaydate":"2014-07-22 08:46:16","displaymodified":"2014-07-22 08:46:16","categories":["Bike","Family","Parents","Role Model","Safety","Unintentional Injury"],"spell":["Safe Kids Grand Forks Talks Bike Helmets","Summer is in full swing and kids are wheeling their bikes out in the nice weather. It is important for both parents and children to remember to wear their helmets at all times when riding a bike. Helmets are 85% effective in reducing head injuries. Head injuries can cause life altering injuries, disabilities, or even death. It is important for parents to set the example and wear helmets when riding, not just as a role model for children, but for their own protection.\n\nHere are some injury statistics concerning wheeled sports activities:\n\n\tOn average over 80 children 14 and under are killed in cycle-related incidents.\n\tOver 200,000 children are injured in cycle-related crashes each year.\n\tEach year, over 60,000 children 14 and under are injured while using skateboards, inline skates or scooters.\n\tHead-injury is the leading cause of wheeled sports-related deaths and the most important determinant of permanent disability after a crash.\n\nHere's the good news:\n\n\tSince 1988, bicycle injury deaths have decreased by 78%.\n\tNationwide, the use of wheeled sports helmets by children has increased from 15% to nearly 45%.\n\tBicycle helmets have been proven to decrease the risk of a brain injury by almost 90%.\n\nWearing a helmet for wheeled sports is the single most effective way to prevent serious injury or death.\n\n\n\nThis is a bicycle helmet. If you fall off your bike, you are most likely to hit the side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head. It is for bike riding only – it should not be used for any other wheeled sports, as it does not provide adequate protection!\n\n\n\nThis is a multi-sport helmet. It can be used for all non-motorized wheeled sports (inline skating, skateboarding, scooter, bicycling). If you fall when doing some of these activities, you are most likely to hit the back, side or front of your head. This helmet protects those parts of your head.\n\n\n\nThis is a toddler helmet. It is usually used by children who ride on tricycles as they tend to tip over backwards and thus need additional protection at the base of the brain. This helmet looks a lot like a multi-sport helmet.\n\nIf you would like to purchase bike helmets at a reduced price, Safe Kids Grand Forks has two types of helmets available for both adults and children.\n\nBike helmets are available for $8, and are to be used exclusively on bikes.\n\nMulti-sport helmets are also available, which can be used for skateboarding, biking, rollerblading, and on scooters. The multi-sport helmets cost $12 each.\n\nBoth bike and multi-sport helmets come in a variety of colors.\n\nFor more information, contact Safe Kids Grand Forks at safekids@altru.org. Altru Health System is proud to serve as the lead agency for Safe Kids Grand Forks.\n\nIf you would like to receive email notification when our new posts are available, please email jwangen@altru.org. Asked to be added to our notification list for the Area Voices blog and/or Safe Kids quarterly newsletter.\n\n","safekids"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:TheDirt.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:eraofsuccess.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:traveltravel.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":13,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"traveltravel.areavoices.com/336","permalink":"http://traveltravel.areavoices.com/2014/04/23/jamaica/","blogid":"37012","blogdomain":"traveltravel.areavoices.com","hostname":"traveltravel.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Could This Be Love?","content":"\nJamaica......what an amazing adventure!\nI was able to spend 6 days in Jamaica in March/April and WOW.  Is it time to go back?? From the sun to the sand, everything was warm, friendly, and FUN!\nWe were able to go to Ocho Rios, Jamaica which was very active!   While we were there we did ziplining, rode a bobsled, and a what we like to call \"ski lift\" up and over the trees!  We also climbed Dunn's River Falls and took a catamaran cruise.  Oh.. and can't forget to mention the continuous listening to Bob Marley!\n\nThere were multiple pools at our resort.. this was one of the main ones.  Lots of time spent here lounging around and soaking up the sun!\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \nMy favorite spot was of course on the beach..  We could watch all the boats on the ocean, go swimming around for fish, and of course just enjoy the sound of the waves!\nUntil next time,\n\n \n\nSharon\nTravel Agent","rawcontent":"\nJamaica......what an amazing adventure!\nI was able to spend 6 days in Jamaica in March/April and WOW. Is it time to go back?? From the sun to the sand, everything was warm, friendly, and FUN!\nWe were able to go to Ocho Rios, Jamaica which was very active! While we were there we did ziplining, rode a bobsled, and a what we like to call \"ski lift\" up and over the trees! We also climbed Dunn's River Falls and took a catamaran cruise. Oh.. and can't forget to mention the continuous listening to Bob Marley!\n\nThere were multiple pools at our resort.. this was one of the main ones. Lots of time spent here lounging around and soaking up the sun!\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \nMy favorite spot was of course on the beach.. We could watch all the boats on the ocean, go swimming around for fish, and of course just enjoy the sound of the waves!\nUntil next time,\n\n \n\nSharon\nTravel Agent","contentnoshortcodes":"\nJamaica......what an amazing adventure!\nI was able to spend 6 days in Jamaica in March/April and WOW. Is it time to go back?? From the sun to the sand, everything was warm, friendly, and FUN!\nWe were able to go to Ocho Rios, Jamaica which was very active! While we were there we did ziplining, rode a bobsled, and a what we like to call \"ski lift\" up and over the trees! We also climbed Dunn's River Falls and took a catamaran cruise. Oh.. and can't forget to mention the continuous listening to Bob Marley!\n\nThere were multiple pools at our resort.. this was one of the main ones. Lots of time spent here lounging around and soaking up the sun!\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \nMy favorite spot was of course on the beach.. We could watch all the boats on the ocean, go swimming around for fish, and of course just enjoy the sound of the waves!\nUntil next time,\n\n \n\nSharon\nTravel Agent","numcomments":0,"author":"christravels","author_s":"http://traveltravel.areavoices.com/author/christravels/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-04-23T18:10:50Z","displaydate":"2014-04-23 13:10:50","displaymodified":"2014-04-23 13:13:12","categories":["Agent Adventure Journal","Fun in the Sun"],"spell":["Could This Be Love?","\nJamaica......what an amazing adventure!\nI was able to spend 6 days in Jamaica in March/April and WOW.  Is it time to go back?? From the sun to the sand, everything was warm, friendly, and FUN!\nWe were able to go to Ocho Rios, Jamaica which was very active!   While we were there we did ziplining, rode a bobsled, and a what we like to call \"ski lift\" up and over the trees!  We also climbed Dunn's River Falls and took a catamaran cruise.  Oh.. and can't forget to mention the continuous listening to Bob Marley!\n\nThere were multiple pools at our resort.. this was one of the main ones.  Lots of time spent here lounging around and soaking up the sun!\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \nMy favorite spot was of course on the beach..  We could watch all the boats on the ocean, go swimming around for fish, and of course just enjoy the sound of the waves!\nUntil next time,\n\n \n\nSharon\nTravel Agent","christravels"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:isaacontech.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":16,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"isaacontech.areavoices.com/377","permalink":"http://isaacontech.areavoices.com/2012/06/06/clay-tablets-or-real-ipads-which-do-you-prefer/","blogid":"7232","blogdomain":"isaacontech.areavoices.com","hostname":"isaacontech.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Clay tablets or real iPads - which do you prefer?","content":"Scammers recently paid cash for some iPad 2s in Vancouver, replaced the real iPads with carefully-weighed bags of modeling clay, resealed the packaging, and returned them to the store for a full refund.\n\nThe first buyers of the \"refurbished\" iPads were treated suspiciously like criminals when they tried to return their bags of modeling clay.  It wasn't until the mainstream media caught wind of the story that other victims came forward.\n\nThe moral of the story: You can't always trust retail packaging.\nIsaac Grover is the senior I.T. consultant at Quality Computer Services.  When he’s not enveloped in technology, he enjoys being with his family and being involved in the community.","rawcontent":"Scammers recently paid cash for some iPad 2s in Vancouver, replaced the real iPads with carefully-weighed bags of modeling clay, resealed the packaging, and returned them to the store for a full refund.\n\nThe first buyers of the \"refurbished\" iPads were treated suspiciously like criminals when they tried to return their bags of modeling clay. It wasn't until the mainstream media caught wind of the story that other victims came forward.\n\nThe moral of the story: You can't always trust retail packaging.\nIsaac Grover is the senior I.T. consultant at Quality Computer Services. When hes not enveloped in technology, he enjoys being with his family and being involved in the community.","contentnoshortcodes":"Scammers recently paid cash for some iPad 2s in Vancouver, replaced the real iPads with carefully-weighed bags of modeling clay, resealed the packaging, and returned them to the store for a full refund.\n\nThe first buyers of the \"refurbished\" iPads were treated suspiciously like criminals when they tried to return their bags of modeling clay. It wasn't until the mainstream media caught wind of the story that other victims came forward.\n\nThe moral of the story: You can't always trust retail packaging.\nIsaac Grover is the senior I.T. consultant at Quality Computer Services. When hes not enveloped in technology, he enjoys being with his family and being involved in the community.","numcomments":0,"author":"Isaac Grover","author_s":"http://isaacontech.areavoices.com/author/isaacgrover/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-06-07T01:57:08Z","displaydate":"2012-06-06 20:57:08","displaymodified":"2012-06-06 20:58:34","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Clay tablets or real iPads - which do you prefer?","Scammers recently paid cash for some iPad 2s in Vancouver, replaced the real iPads with carefully-weighed bags of modeling clay, resealed the packaging, and returned them to the store for a full refund.\n\nThe first buyers of the \"refurbished\" iPads were treated suspiciously like criminals when they tried to return their bags of modeling clay.  It wasn't until the mainstream media caught wind of the story that other victims came forward.\n\nThe moral of the story: You can't always trust retail packaging.\nIsaac Grover is the senior I.T. consultant at Quality Computer Services.  When he’s not enveloped in technology, he enjoys being with his family and being involved in the community.","Isaac Grover"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:twinsfocus.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":4,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"twinsfocus.areavoices.com/958","permalink":"http://twinsfocus.areavoices.com/2012/02/26/mri-reveals-torn-ucl-for-joel-zumaya/","blogid":"18679","blogdomain":"twinsfocus.areavoices.com","hostname":"twinsfocus.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"MRI Reveals Torn UCL for Joel Zumaya","content":"Multiple sources are reporting that the MRI Joel Zumaya had this morning revealed a torn UCL in his right elbow.  A torn UCL will mean Tommy John surgery and that he will not pitch in the 2012 season.\n\nZumaya, who has battled numerous injuries the past 5 years, none worse than this which could end his career.  Zumaya could get another shot in a year or two but may have to contemplate retirement now.\n\n \n\nHere is the definition of a torn UCL via ConcordOrtho.com:\n\nThe ulnar collateral ligament can become stretched, frayed or torn through the stress of repetitive throwing motions. If the force on the soft tissues is greater than the tensile strength of the structure, then tiny tears of the ligament can develop. Months (and even years) of throwing hard cause a process of microtears, degeneration, and finally, rupture of the ligament. The dominant arm is affected most often. Eventually the weakened tendon my rupture completely causing a pop and immediate pain. The athlete may report the injury occurred during a single throw, but the reality is usually that the ligament simply finally became weakened to the point that it finally ruptured.\n\n \n\nZumaya was a low risk, high reward signing for the Twins which didn't work out.  The Twins could have signed another right handed reliever for around $1 million but opted not to this offseason.\n\nTerry Ryan will meet with reporters down in Fort Myers Florida later today to provide more details, Phil Mackey of 1500ESPN tweeted: Just talked to Terry Ryan, who said #Twins will likely stay in-house to patch bullpen w/ Zumaya out. Said Zumaya is \"distraught.\"\n\nReliever Michael Wuertz is still on the market and could be a cheap replacement option for the Twins but it appears as of right now they will not explore that option.  That could change in the coming weeks if no one stands out in camp and shows they can help the Twins bullpen in 2012.\n\n \n\nFeel free to share your thoughts below on Zumaya's injury and what the Twins should do next\n\n \n\nPhoto credit to news-press.com","rawcontent":"Multiple sources are reporting that the MRI Joel Zumaya had this morning revealed a torn UCL in his right elbow. A torn UCL will mean Tommy John surgery and that he will not pitch in the 2012 season.\n\nZumaya, who has battled numerous injuries the past 5 years, none worse than this which could end his career. Zumaya could get another shot in a year or two but may have tocontemplateretirement now.\n\n \n\nHere is the definition of a torn UCL via ConcordOrtho.com:\n\nThe ulnar collateral ligament can become stretched, frayed or torn through the stress of repetitive throwing motions. If the force on the soft tissues is greater than the tensile strength of the structure, then tiny tears of the ligament can develop. Months (and even years) of throwing hard cause a process of microtears, degeneration, and finally, rupture of the ligament. The dominant arm is affected most often. Eventually the weakened tendon my rupture completely causing a pop and immediate pain. The athlete may report the injury occurred during a single throw, but the reality is usually that the ligament simply finally became weakened to the point that it finally ruptured.\n\n \n\nZumaya was a low risk, high reward signing for the Twins which didn't work out. The Twins could have signed another right handed reliever for around $1 million but opted not to this offseason.\n\nTerry Ryan will meet with reporters down in Fort Myers Florida later today to provide more details, Phil Mackey of 1500ESPN tweeted:Just talked to Terry Ryan, who said#Twinswill likely stay in-house to patch bullpen w/ Zumaya out. Said Zumaya is \"distraught.\"\n\nReliever Michael Wuertz is still on the market and could be a cheap replacement option for the Twins but it appears as of right now they will not explore that option. That could change in the coming weeks if no one stands out in camp and shows they can help the Twins bullpen in 2012.\n\n \n\nFeel free to share your thoughts below on Zumaya's injury and what the Twins should do next\n\n \n\nPhoto credit to news-press.com","contentnoshortcodes":"Multiple sources are reporting that the MRI Joel Zumaya had this morning revealed a torn UCL in his right elbow. A torn UCL will mean Tommy John surgery and that he will not pitch in the 2012 season.\n\nZumaya, who has battled numerous injuries the past 5 years, none worse than this which could end his career. Zumaya could get another shot in a year or two but may have tocontemplateretirement now.\n\n \n\nHere is the definition of a torn UCL via ConcordOrtho.com:\n\nThe ulnar collateral ligament can become stretched, frayed or torn through the stress of repetitive throwing motions. If the force on the soft tissues is greater than the tensile strength of the structure, then tiny tears of the ligament can develop. Months (and even years) of throwing hard cause a process of microtears, degeneration, and finally, rupture of the ligament. The dominant arm is affected most often. Eventually the weakened tendon my rupture completely causing a pop and immediate pain. The athlete may report the injury occurred during a single throw, but the reality is usually that the ligament simply finally became weakened to the point that it finally ruptured.\n\n \n\nZumaya was a low risk, high reward signing for the Twins which didn't work out. The Twins could have signed another right handed reliever for around $1 million but opted not to this offseason.\n\nTerry Ryan will meet with reporters down in Fort Myers Florida later today to provide more details, Phil Mackey of 1500ESPN tweeted:Just talked to Terry Ryan, who said#Twinswill likely stay in-house to patch bullpen w/ Zumaya out. Said Zumaya is \"distraught.\"\n\nReliever Michael Wuertz is still on the market and could be a cheap replacement option for the Twins but it appears as of right now they will not explore that option. That could change in the coming weeks if no one stands out in camp and shows they can help the Twins bullpen in 2012.\n\n \n\nFeel free to share your thoughts below on Zumaya's injury and what the Twins should do next\n\n \n\nPhoto credit to news-press.com","numcomments":0,"author":"Chad Jacobsen","author_s":"http://twinsfocus.areavoices.com/author/chadjacobsen/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-02-26T18:44:34Z","displaydate":"2012-02-26 12:44:34","displaymodified":"2012-02-26 12:46:04","tags":["Baseball","Entertainment","injury","Joel Zumaya","Michael Wuertz","Minnesota Twins","News","Sports","Spring training","Twins"],"categories":["Spring Training"],"spell":["MRI Reveals Torn UCL for Joel Zumaya","Multiple sources are reporting that the MRI Joel Zumaya had this morning revealed a torn UCL in his right elbow.  A torn UCL will mean Tommy John surgery and that he will not pitch in the 2012 season.\n\nZumaya, who has battled numerous injuries the past 5 years, none worse than this which could end his career.  Zumaya could get another shot in a year or two but may have to contemplate retirement now.\n\n \n\nHere is the definition of a torn UCL via ConcordOrtho.com:\n\nThe ulnar collateral ligament can become stretched, frayed or torn through the stress of repetitive throwing motions. If the force on the soft tissues is greater than the tensile strength of the structure, then tiny tears of the ligament can develop. Months (and even years) of throwing hard cause a process of microtears, degeneration, and finally, rupture of the ligament. The dominant arm is affected most often. Eventually the weakened tendon my rupture completely causing a pop and immediate pain. The athlete may report the injury occurred during a single throw, but the reality is usually that the ligament simply finally became weakened to the point that it finally ruptured.\n\n \n\nZumaya was a low risk, high reward signing for the Twins which didn't work out.  The Twins could have signed another right handed reliever for around $1 million but opted not to this offseason.\n\nTerry Ryan will meet with reporters down in Fort Myers Florida later today to provide more details, Phil Mackey of 1500ESPN tweeted: Just talked to Terry Ryan, who said #Twins will likely stay in-house to patch bullpen w/ Zumaya out. Said Zumaya is \"distraught.\"\n\nReliever Michael Wuertz is still on the market and could be a cheap replacement option for the Twins but it appears as of right now they will not explore that option.  That could change in the coming weeks if no one stands out in camp and shows they can help the Twins bullpen in 2012.\n\n \n\nFeel free to share your thoughts below on Zumaya's injury and what the Twins should do next\n\n \n\nPhoto credit to news-press.com","Chad Jacobsen"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:positivelybeautiful.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":145,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"positivelybeautiful.areavoices.com/735","permalink":"http://positivelybeautiful.areavoices.com/2014/07/02/3-innocent-habits-that-are-just-as-bad-for-your-health-as-smoking/","blogid":"18629","blogdomain":"positivelybeautiful.areavoices.com","hostname":"positivelybeautiful.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"3 \"innocent\" habits that are just as bad for your health as smoking...","content":"We may love the show, but I’m so glad we don’t live in the Mad Men era anymore, when casual smoking at work was a total thumbs up. (Just like hurling offensive comments at female employees, and having a triple-martini lunch!) These days, most people recognize that cigarettes are a terrible health risk. My son Grant plugs his nose and holds his breath if we walk by someone smoking. He sometimes slips out a less than polite comment too. Although I don’t like smoking, I don’t like him being rude either. But when it comes to your health and longevity, there are several other habits that are just as bad — if not worse — than having a smoke.   1.    Sitting all day. As this NPR story reports: “Men who reported more than 23 hours a week of sedentary activity had a 64 percent greater risk of dying from heart disease than those who reported less than 11 hours a week of sedentary activity.” Sitting at your desk absolutely counts as “sedentary activity.” If you’re working at your computer for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, you’re already clocking in at 30 hours. (And that’s before you factor in that Netflix movie marathon on the couch after work!) To fight back against this health risk, invest in a standing desk. Or, at the very least, take a 10-minute stretch break every 90 minutes to get your circulation flowing. I recently wrote about taking walking meetings, or doing stand-up huddles to get things done. 2. Not getting enough sleep. As a physician who is board-certified in sleep medicine, as well as ENT and integrative medicine, I’ve studied the effects of sleep deprivation firsthand, and let me tell you… it’s pretty scary. Lack of sleep (or low-quality sleep that’s being disrupted by blinking lights, snoring or sleep apnea) raises your risk for stroke, heart disease, hypertension, depression and diabetes. If you’re frequently groggy in the morning, like you can’t pull yourself out of bed without a gallon of coffee, make some lifestyle adjustments — or consult with a sleep specialist! 3. Unresolved anger. It doesn’t matter if you’re angry at yourself, your parents, your partner, or “the entire world” — living in a state of chronic anger + bitterness can be deadly. As this article reports, summarizing a study from Washington State University: “People over the age of 50 who express their anger by lashing out are more likely to have calcium deposits in their coronary arteries — an indication that you’re at a high risk for a heart attack.” Lashing out is bad, but suppressing your anger isn’t any better. Bottling it up has been linked to elevated blood pressure and heart rate. Some researchers suspect that suppressing negative emotions can actually triple your risk for a heart attack. The solution is to find healthy ways to uncork your emotions. Psychologist Dr. Suzanne Gelb recommends thwacking a pillow with a knotted up towel. I guess the punching bag workout would be great as well! Or, like sculptor Pablo Solomon, you could try banging a stone with a hammer and chisel, turning your emotions into a work of art! Do what it takes to work on these three health risks. Your well-being is worth it. ~ Dr. Sue P.S. What’s the toughest habit you’ve ever had to kick?","rawcontent":"We may love the show, but Im so glad we dont live in the Mad Men era anymore, when casual smoking at work was a total thumbs up. (Just like hurling offensive comments at female employees, and having a triple-martini lunch!) These days, most people recognize that cigarettes are a terrible health risk. My son Grant plugs his nose and holds his breath if we walk by someone smoking. He sometimes slips out a less than polite comment too. Although I dont like smoking, I dont like him being rude either. But when it comes to your health and longevity, there are several other habits that are just as bad if not worse than having a smoke. 1. Sitting all day. As thisNPR story reports: Men who reported more than 23 hours a week of sedentary activity had a 64 percent greater risk of dying from heart disease than those who reported less than 11 hours a week of sedentary activity. Sitting at your desk absolutely counts as sedentary activity. If youre working at your computer for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, youre already clocking in at 30 hours. (And thats before you factor in that Netflix movie marathon on the couch after work!) To fight back against this health risk, invest in a standing desk. Or, at the very least, take a 10-minute stretch break every 90 minutes to get your circulation flowing. I recently wrote about taking walking meetings, or doing stand-up huddles to get things done. 2. Not getting enough sleep. As a physician who is board-certified in sleep medicine, as well as ENT and integrative medicine, Ive studied the effects of sleep deprivation firsthand, and let me tell you its pretty scary. Lack of sleep (or low-quality sleep thats being disrupted by blinking lights, snoring or sleep apnea) raises your risk for stroke, heart disease, hypertension, depression and diabetes. If youre frequently groggy in the morning, like you cant pull yourself out of bed without a gallon of coffee, make somelifestyle adjustments or consult with a sleep specialist! 3. Unresolved anger. It doesnt matter if youre angry at yourself, your parents, your partner, or the entire world living in a state of chronic anger + bitterness can be deadly. Asthis article reports, summarizing a study from Washington State University: People over the age of 50 who express their anger by lashing out are more likely to have calcium deposits in their coronary arteries an indication that youre at a high risk for a heart attack. Lashing out is bad, but suppressing your anger isnt any better. Bottling it up has been linked to elevated blood pressure and heart rate. Some researchers suspect that suppressing negative emotions can actually triple your risk for a heart attack. The solution is to find healthy ways to uncork your emotions. Psychologist Dr. Suzanne Gelb recommends thwacking a pillow with a knotted up towel. I guess the punching bag workout would be great as well! Or, like sculptor Pablo Solomon, you could try banging a stone with a hammer and chisel, turning your emotions into a work of art! Do what it takes to work on these three health risks. Your well-being is worth it. ~ Dr. Sue P.S. Whats the toughest habit youve ever had to kick?","contentnoshortcodes":"We may love the show, but Im so glad we dont live in the Mad Men era anymore, when casual smoking at work was a total thumbs up. (Just like hurling offensive comments at female employees, and having a triple-martini lunch!) These days, most people recognize that cigarettes are a terrible health risk. My son Grant plugs his nose and holds his breath if we walk by someone smoking. He sometimes slips out a less than polite comment too. Although I dont like smoking, I dont like him being rude either. But when it comes to your health and longevity, there are several other habits that are just as bad if not worse than having a smoke. 1. Sitting all day. As thisNPR story reports: Men who reported more than 23 hours a week of sedentary activity had a 64 percent greater risk of dying from heart disease than those who reported less than 11 hours a week of sedentary activity. Sitting at your desk absolutely counts as sedentary activity. If youre working at your computer for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, youre already clocking in at 30 hours. (And thats before you factor in that Netflix movie marathon on the couch after work!) To fight back against this health risk, invest in a standing desk. Or, at the very least, take a 10-minute stretch break every 90 minutes to get your circulation flowing. I recently wrote about taking walking meetings, or doing stand-up huddles to get things done. 2. Not getting enough sleep. As a physician who is board-certified in sleep medicine, as well as ENT and integrative medicine, Ive studied the effects of sleep deprivation firsthand, and let me tell you its pretty scary. Lack of sleep (or low-quality sleep thats being disrupted by blinking lights, snoring or sleep apnea) raises your risk for stroke, heart disease, hypertension, depression and diabetes. If youre frequently groggy in the morning, like you cant pull yourself out of bed without a gallon of coffee, make somelifestyle adjustments or consult with a sleep specialist! 3. Unresolved anger. It doesnt matter if youre angry at yourself, your parents, your partner, or the entire world living in a state of chronic anger + bitterness can be deadly. Asthis article reports, summarizing a study from Washington State University: People over the age of 50 who express their anger by lashing out are more likely to have calcium deposits in their coronary arteries an indication that youre at a high risk for a heart attack. Lashing out is bad, but suppressing your anger isnt any better. Bottling it up has been linked to elevated blood pressure and heart rate. Some researchers suspect that suppressing negative emotions can actually triple your risk for a heart attack. The solution is to find healthy ways to uncork your emotions. Psychologist Dr. Suzanne Gelb recommends thwacking a pillow with a knotted up towel. I guess the punching bag workout would be great as well! Or, like sculptor Pablo Solomon, you could try banging a stone with a hammer and chisel, turning your emotions into a work of art! Do what it takes to work on these three health risks. Your well-being is worth it. ~ Dr. Sue P.S. Whats the toughest habit youve ever had to kick?","numcomments":0,"author":"Dr. Susan Mathison","author_s":"http://positivelybeautiful.areavoices.com/author/susanmathison/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-02T14:37:46Z","displaydate":"2014-07-02 09:37:46","displaymodified":"2014-07-02 09:37:46","categories":["Positively Beautiful"],"spell":["3 \"innocent\" habits that are just as bad for your health as smoking...","We may love the show, but I’m so glad we don’t live in the Mad Men era anymore, when casual smoking at work was a total thumbs up. (Just like hurling offensive comments at female employees, and having a triple-martini lunch!) These days, most people recognize that cigarettes are a terrible health risk. My son Grant plugs his nose and holds his breath if we walk by someone smoking. He sometimes slips out a less than polite comment too. Although I don’t like smoking, I don’t like him being rude either. But when it comes to your health and longevity, there are several other habits that are just as bad — if not worse — than having a smoke.   1.    Sitting all day. As this NPR story reports: “Men who reported more than 23 hours a week of sedentary activity had a 64 percent greater risk of dying from heart disease than those who reported less than 11 hours a week of sedentary activity.” Sitting at your desk absolutely counts as “sedentary activity.” If you’re working at your computer for 6 hours a day, 5 days a week, you’re already clocking in at 30 hours. (And that’s before you factor in that Netflix movie marathon on the couch after work!) To fight back against this health risk, invest in a standing desk. Or, at the very least, take a 10-minute stretch break every 90 minutes to get your circulation flowing. I recently wrote about taking walking meetings, or doing stand-up huddles to get things done. 2. Not getting enough sleep. As a physician who is board-certified in sleep medicine, as well as ENT and integrative medicine, I’ve studied the effects of sleep deprivation firsthand, and let me tell you… it’s pretty scary. Lack of sleep (or low-quality sleep that’s being disrupted by blinking lights, snoring or sleep apnea) raises your risk for stroke, heart disease, hypertension, depression and diabetes. If you’re frequently groggy in the morning, like you can’t pull yourself out of bed without a gallon of coffee, make some lifestyle adjustments — or consult with a sleep specialist! 3. Unresolved anger. It doesn’t matter if you’re angry at yourself, your parents, your partner, or “the entire world” — living in a state of chronic anger + bitterness can be deadly. As this article reports, summarizing a study from Washington State University: “People over the age of 50 who express their anger by lashing out are more likely to have calcium deposits in their coronary arteries — an indication that you’re at a high risk for a heart attack.” Lashing out is bad, but suppressing your anger isn’t any better. Bottling it up has been linked to elevated blood pressure and heart rate. Some researchers suspect that suppressing negative emotions can actually triple your risk for a heart attack. The solution is to find healthy ways to uncork your emotions. Psychologist Dr. Suzanne Gelb recommends thwacking a pillow with a knotted up towel. I guess the punching bag workout would be great as well! Or, like sculptor Pablo Solomon, you could try banging a stone with a hammer and chisel, turning your emotions into a work of art! Do what it takes to work on these three health risks. Your well-being is worth it. ~ Dr. Sue P.S. What’s the toughest habit you’ve ever had to kick?","Dr. Susan Mathison"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:holyresurrection.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":245,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"holyresurrection.areavoices.com/1324","permalink":"http://holyresurrection.areavoices.com/2014/07/02/new-north-dakota-orthodox-christian-temple-a-pastoral-reflection/","blogid":"17587","blogdomain":"holyresurrection.areavoices.com","hostname":"holyresurrection.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"New North Dakota Orthodox Christian Temple: a Pastoral Reflection","content":"Orthodox Christianity in North Dakota is on the opposite end of the demographic scale from Lutheranism, so when an Orthodox mission plant grows enough to purchase its first building, it 's a big deal.  Currently, there are only two Orthodox Church in America (OCA) parishes in North Dakota.  There is a parish in Minot that has existed since the early twentieth century and a parish in Fargo, which started in 1987 but didn't experience serious growth until 2007.  It has taken seven years since that time, but this past Sunday, Holy Resurrection Orthodox Mission Church moved into its new building at 1604 52nd Ave South:\n\n\n\nFor a small mission that has been living out of boxes, this is a big deal yet it is important for mission plants to remember just why it is important as they develop and grow into more established parishes.  Obtaining a building is a calling, it is not an end in itself.  This might seem to be a trite statement, but we all have seen situations with established parishes and cathedrals (of any tradition) that have become bogged down with fights over issues relating to \"the building.\"  New carpet versus new windows, for instance.  Or balancing the budget on the back of the priest while expanding the building.  These things happen.  When they do, they are signs of parishes that have begun to lose their way.  Buildings are callings because obtaining one provides opportunities.  How these opportunities will be fulfilled will vary from place to place but they will be there, such as:  inviting outsiders in for dinners, ministries, etc., having a place to produce and provide food for those who are hungry, having a safe haven for prayer, etc.  A building builds a parish to the degree it serves the parish's entry into a deeper relationship with God and a deeper love for one's neighbor.  May the building in Fargo be seen as an opportunity and not an end in itself.","rawcontent":"Orthodox Christianity in North Dakota is on the opposite end of the demographic scale from Lutheranism, so when an Orthodox mission plant grows enough to purchase its first building, it 's a big deal. Currently, there are only two Orthodox Church in America (OCA) parishes in North Dakota. There is a parish in Minot that has existed since the early twentieth century and a parish in Fargo, which started in 1987 but didn't experience serious growth until 2007. It has taken seven years since that time, but this past Sunday, Holy Resurrection Orthodox Mission Church moved into its new building at 1604 52nd Ave South:\n\n\n\nFor a small mission that has been living out of boxes, this is a big deal yet it is important for mission plants to remember just why it is important as they develop and grow into more established parishes. Obtaining a building is a calling, it is not an end in itself. This might seem to be a trite statement, but we all have seen situations with established parishes and cathedrals (of any tradition) that have become bogged down with fights over issues relating to \"the building.\" New carpet versus new windows, for instance. Or balancing the budget on the back of the priest while expanding the building. These things happen. When they do, they are signs of parishes that have begun to lose their way. Buildings are callings because obtaining one provides opportunities. How these opportunities will be fulfilled will vary from place to place but they will be there, such as: inviting outsiders in for dinners, ministries, etc., having a place to produce and provide food for those who are hungry, having a safe haven for prayer, etc. A building builds a parish to the degree it serves the parish's entry into a deeper relationship with God and a deeper love for one's neighbor. May the building in Fargo be seen as an opportunity and not an end in itself.","contentnoshortcodes":"Orthodox Christianity in North Dakota is on the opposite end of the demographic scale from Lutheranism, so when an Orthodox mission plant grows enough to purchase its first building, it 's a big deal. Currently, there are only two Orthodox Church in America (OCA) parishes in North Dakota. There is a parish in Minot that has existed since the early twentieth century and a parish in Fargo, which started in 1987 but didn't experience serious growth until 2007. It has taken seven years since that time, but this past Sunday, Holy Resurrection Orthodox Mission Church moved into its new building at 1604 52nd Ave South:\n\n\n\nFor a small mission that has been living out of boxes, this is a big deal yet it is important for mission plants to remember just why it is important as they develop and grow into more established parishes. Obtaining a building is a calling, it is not an end in itself. This might seem to be a trite statement, but we all have seen situations with established parishes and cathedrals (of any tradition) that have become bogged down with fights over issues relating to \"the building.\" New carpet versus new windows, for instance. Or balancing the budget on the back of the priest while expanding the building. These things happen. When they do, they are signs of parishes that have begun to lose their way. Buildings are callings because obtaining one provides opportunities. How these opportunities will be fulfilled will vary from place to place but they will be there, such as: inviting outsiders in for dinners, ministries, etc., having a place to produce and provide food for those who are hungry, having a safe haven for prayer, etc. A building builds a parish to the degree it serves the parish's entry into a deeper relationship with God and a deeper love for one's neighbor. May the building in Fargo be seen as an opportunity and not an end in itself.","numcomments":0,"author":"Rev. Oliver Herbel","author_s":"http://holyresurrection.areavoices.com/author/holyresurrection/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-02T01:55:02Z","displaydate":"2014-07-02 01:55:02","displaymodified":"2014-07-02 01:56:00","tags":["building ownership","church building","Fargo","mission plant","new building","North Dakota","Orthodox Christian","Orthodoxy","purchase","Temple"],"categories":["Fargo","Holy Resurrection Parish Events","Minot","North Dakota","Practical Theology"],"spell":["New North Dakota Orthodox Christian Temple: a Pastoral Reflection","Orthodox Christianity in North Dakota is on the opposite end of the demographic scale from Lutheranism, so when an Orthodox mission plant grows enough to purchase its first building, it 's a big deal.  Currently, there are only two Orthodox Church in America (OCA) parishes in North Dakota.  There is a parish in Minot that has existed since the early twentieth century and a parish in Fargo, which started in 1987 but didn't experience serious growth until 2007.  It has taken seven years since that time, but this past Sunday, Holy Resurrection Orthodox Mission Church moved into its new building at 1604 52nd Ave South:\n\n\n\nFor a small mission that has been living out of boxes, this is a big deal yet it is important for mission plants to remember just why it is important as they develop and grow into more established parishes.  Obtaining a building is a calling, it is not an end in itself.  This might seem to be a trite statement, but we all have seen situations with established parishes and cathedrals (of any tradition) that have become bogged down with fights over issues relating to \"the building.\"  New carpet versus new windows, for instance.  Or balancing the budget on the back of the priest while expanding the building.  These things happen.  When they do, they are signs of parishes that have begun to lose their way.  Buildings are callings because obtaining one provides opportunities.  How these opportunities will be fulfilled will vary from place to place but they will be there, such as:  inviting outsiders in for dinners, ministries, etc., having a place to produce and provide food for those who are hungry, having a safe haven for prayer, etc.  A building builds a parish to the degree it serves the parish's entry into a deeper relationship with God and a deeper love for one's neighbor.  May the building in Fargo be seen as an opportunity and not an end in itself.","Rev. Oliver Herbel"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:lookatthis.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":37,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"lookatthis.areavoices.com/2368","permalink":"http://lookatthis.areavoices.com/2014/07/17/2014-alumni-association-annual-meeting/","blogid":"21313","blogdomain":"lookatthis.areavoices.com","hostname":"lookatthis.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"2014 Alumni Association Annual Meeting","content":"112th Annual Alumni Association MeetingAtwater High SchoolAtwater – Grove City High SchoolAtwater – Cosmos – Grove City High SchoolSaturday, July 12, 2014\n\n\n Photo by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1939 – 75 year class – Diamond ClassEdna Carlson Grof   \nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1944 – 70 year class   \nRussell Miller, Fern Magnuson Levik Fredrick, Dorothy Olson Nelson, Randy Paulsen\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\n AHS Class of 1949 – 65 year class\n\nFront Row:  Arlene Gratz Behm, Ramona Zaeska Werner, Carol Nelson Sonsteby, Gloria Magnuson Peterson, Janet Miller Johnson, (insert) David Solbrack\n\nBack Row:  Ralph Hall, Gordon Bloomquist, Bob Arends\n\nNot Pictured:: Marvis Okeson Dickinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 – 60 year class\n \n\nPurple and White 1954 Panther Hats made by Jim Quist\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 – 60 year class\n\n\nFront Row:  Sylvia Goodsen MacRunnel, Roberta Nelson Swenson, Phyllis Theisen Nelson, Bessie Klose Johnson, Phyllis Gratz Quist, Grace Johnson Peterson, Shirley Nelson Larson\n\nBack Row:  Ruthie Quistad Huisinga Meyering, Rachel Munson Anthony, Kenneth Gratz, Paul Nelson, Jim Quist, Dale Nelson, Jack Tait, Bruce Larson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1959 – 55 year class\n\n\nFront Row:  Karin Johnson, Darlene Kragenbring Bratberg, Jackie Nelson Powell, Peg Tat Condon\n\nBack Row:  Jerry Rossell, Ken Orsten, Rob Paulson , Betty Paulson, Dennis Baker\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 – 50 year class – Golden Class\n\nFront row: Gary Behm, Jeanette Palmer Mayer, Leone Gratz Blommer, Carol Rodekuhr Haviland, Caroline Nelson Eisenreich, Joyce Larson Bjur, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson,\n\nSecond row: Mike Tagtow, Lloyd Urban, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Terre Windsor Holm, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Diana Ackerman Smith, Jane Anderson Taubman, Janice Johnson Bicknell, Doug Beecroft, Don Amdahl, Bill Moll\n\nThird row:  John Williamson, Jon Olson, Wayne Denton, Larry Slinden, Charles Miller, Gerald Larson\n\nNot Pictured:  John Wyman Hovey\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 – 50 year class\n\nFront row;  Lloyd Urban, Carol Rodeduhr Haviland, Doug Beecroft, Terre Windsor Holm, Jane Anderson Taubman, Joyce Larson Bjur, Diana Ackerman Smith, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson\nSecond row:  Gary Behm, Wyman Hovey, John Williamson, Wayne Denton, Marlene Hoepner Wittman, Leone Gratz Blommer, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Jon Olson, Mike Tagtow\n\nThird row: Gerald Larson, Bill Moll, Larry Slinden, Stanley Peterson, Lee Elton, Charles Millier, Don Amdahl, Randy Kragenbring\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1974 – 40 year class\n\n\nFront Row: LeAnn Latterell Larson, Bev Sebring Hasbrook, Anne Windson, Zella Tagtow Link, Sheryl Gross Downes, Dennis Peterson, Becky Monson Prieto\n\nBack Row: Tom Kingery, Lloyd Nelson, Donn Peterson, Howard Behm, Paul Hedberg, Roger Johnson, Gary Carlson, Kathy Behm Black, Jim Swenson, Denise Buer Hedberg, Scott Peterson, Kevin Gertgen, Larry Miller, Mark Hutchinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\n ","rawcontent":"112th Annual Alumni Association MeetingAtwater High SchoolAtwater Grove City High SchoolAtwater Cosmos Grove City High SchoolSaturday, July 12, 2014\n\n\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1939 75 year class Diamond ClassEdna Carlson Grof\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1944 70 year class\nRussell Miller, Fern Magnuson Levik Fredrick, Dorothy Olson Nelson, Randy Paulsen\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1949 65 year class\n\nFront Row: Arlene Gratz Behm, Ramona Zaeska Werner, Carol Nelson Sonsteby, Gloria Magnuson Peterson, Janet Miller Johnson, (insert) David Solbrack\n\nBack Row: Ralph Hall, Gordon Bloomquist, Bob Arends\n\nNot Pictured:: Marvis Okeson Dickinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 60 year class\n\n\nPurple and White 1954 Panther Hats made by Jim Quist\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 60 year class\n\n\nFront Row: Sylvia Goodsen MacRunnel, Roberta Nelson Swenson, Phyllis Theisen Nelson, Bessie Klose Johnson, Phyllis Gratz Quist, Grace Johnson Peterson, Shirley Nelson Larson\n\nBack Row: Ruthie Quistad Huisinga Meyering, Rachel Munson Anthony, Kenneth Gratz, Paul Nelson, Jim Quist, Dale Nelson, Jack Tait, Bruce Larson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1959 55 year class\n\n\nFront Row: Karin Johnson, Darlene Kragenbring Bratberg, Jackie Nelson Powell, Peg Tat Condon\n\nBack Row: Jerry Rossell, Ken Orsten, Rob Paulson , Betty Paulson, Dennis Baker\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 50 year class Golden Class\n\nFront row: Gary Behm, Jeanette Palmer Mayer, Leone Gratz Blommer, Carol Rodekuhr Haviland, Caroline Nelson Eisenreich, Joyce Larson Bjur, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson,\n\nSecond row: Mike Tagtow, Lloyd Urban, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Terre Windsor Holm, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Diana Ackerman Smith, Jane Anderson Taubman, Janice Johnson Bicknell, Doug Beecroft, Don Amdahl, Bill Moll\n\nThird row: John Williamson, Jon Olson, Wayne Denton, Larry Slinden, Charles Miller, Gerald Larson\n\nNot Pictured: John Wyman Hovey\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 50 year class\n\nFront row; Lloyd Urban, Carol Rodeduhr Haviland, Doug Beecroft, Terre Windsor Holm, Jane Anderson Taubman, Joyce Larson Bjur, Diana Ackerman Smith, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson\nSecond row: Gary Behm, Wyman Hovey, John Williamson, Wayne Denton, Marlene Hoepner Wittman, Leone Gratz Blommer, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Jon Olson, Mike Tagtow\n\nThird row: Gerald Larson, Bill Moll, Larry Slinden, Stanley Peterson, Lee Elton, Charles Millier, Don Amdahl, Randy Kragenbring\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1974 40 year class\n\n\nFront Row: LeAnn Latterell Larson, Bev Sebring Hasbrook, Anne Windson, Zella Tagtow Link, Sheryl Gross Downes, Dennis Peterson, Becky Monson Prieto\n\nBack Row: Tom Kingery, Lloyd Nelson, Donn Peterson, Howard Behm, Paul Hedberg, Roger Johnson, Gary Carlson, Kathy Behm Black, Jim Swenson, Denise Buer Hedberg, Scott Peterson, Kevin Gertgen, Larry Miller, Mark Hutchinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"112th Annual Alumni Association MeetingAtwater High SchoolAtwater Grove City High SchoolAtwater Cosmos Grove City High SchoolSaturday, July 12, 2014\n\n\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1939 75 year class Diamond ClassEdna Carlson Grof\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1944 70 year class\nRussell Miller, Fern Magnuson Levik Fredrick, Dorothy Olson Nelson, Randy Paulsen\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1949 65 year class\n\nFront Row: Arlene Gratz Behm, Ramona Zaeska Werner, Carol Nelson Sonsteby, Gloria Magnuson Peterson, Janet Miller Johnson, (insert) David Solbrack\n\nBack Row: Ralph Hall, Gordon Bloomquist, Bob Arends\n\nNot Pictured:: Marvis Okeson Dickinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 60 year class\n\n\nPurple and White 1954 Panther Hats made by Jim Quist\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 60 year class\n\n\nFront Row: Sylvia Goodsen MacRunnel, Roberta Nelson Swenson, Phyllis Theisen Nelson, Bessie Klose Johnson, Phyllis Gratz Quist, Grace Johnson Peterson, Shirley Nelson Larson\n\nBack Row: Ruthie Quistad Huisinga Meyering, Rachel Munson Anthony, Kenneth Gratz, Paul Nelson, Jim Quist, Dale Nelson, Jack Tait, Bruce Larson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1959 55 year class\n\n\nFront Row: Karin Johnson, Darlene Kragenbring Bratberg, Jackie Nelson Powell, Peg Tat Condon\n\nBack Row: Jerry Rossell, Ken Orsten, Rob Paulson , Betty Paulson, Dennis Baker\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 50 year class Golden Class\n\nFront row: Gary Behm, Jeanette Palmer Mayer, Leone Gratz Blommer, Carol Rodekuhr Haviland, Caroline Nelson Eisenreich, Joyce Larson Bjur, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson,\n\nSecond row: Mike Tagtow, Lloyd Urban, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Terre Windsor Holm, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Diana Ackerman Smith, Jane Anderson Taubman, Janice Johnson Bicknell, Doug Beecroft, Don Amdahl, Bill Moll\n\nThird row: John Williamson, Jon Olson, Wayne Denton, Larry Slinden, Charles Miller, Gerald Larson\n\nNot Pictured: John Wyman Hovey\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 50 year class\n\nFront row; Lloyd Urban, Carol Rodeduhr Haviland, Doug Beecroft, Terre Windsor Holm, Jane Anderson Taubman, Joyce Larson Bjur, Diana Ackerman Smith, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson\nSecond row: Gary Behm, Wyman Hovey, John Williamson, Wayne Denton, Marlene Hoepner Wittman, Leone Gratz Blommer, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Jon Olson, Mike Tagtow\n\nThird row: Gerald Larson, Bill Moll, Larry Slinden, Stanley Peterson, Lee Elton, Charles Millier, Don Amdahl, Randy Kragenbring\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1974 40 year class\n\n\nFront Row: LeAnn Latterell Larson, Bev Sebring Hasbrook, Anne Windson, Zella Tagtow Link, Sheryl Gross Downes, Dennis Peterson, Becky Monson Prieto\n\nBack Row: Tom Kingery, Lloyd Nelson, Donn Peterson, Howard Behm, Paul Hedberg, Roger Johnson, Gary Carlson, Kathy Behm Black, Jim Swenson, Denise Buer Hedberg, Scott Peterson, Kevin Gertgen, Larry Miller, Mark Hutchinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Tami Tagtow","author_s":"http://lookatthis.areavoices.com/author/ttagtow/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-18T01:40:55Z","displaydate":"2014-07-17 20:40:55","displaymodified":"2014-07-18 13:32:52","tags":["ACGC","ACGC School","Atwater","Atwater Alumni","Atwater High School"],"categories":["ACGC","Alumni","Atwater"],"spell":["2014 Alumni Association Annual Meeting","112th Annual Alumni Association MeetingAtwater High SchoolAtwater – Grove City High SchoolAtwater – Cosmos – Grove City High SchoolSaturday, July 12, 2014\n\n\n Photo by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1939 – 75 year class – Diamond ClassEdna Carlson Grof   \nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1944 – 70 year class   \nRussell Miller, Fern Magnuson Levik Fredrick, Dorothy Olson Nelson, Randy Paulsen\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\n AHS Class of 1949 – 65 year class\n\nFront Row:  Arlene Gratz Behm, Ramona Zaeska Werner, Carol Nelson Sonsteby, Gloria Magnuson Peterson, Janet Miller Johnson, (insert) David Solbrack\n\nBack Row:  Ralph Hall, Gordon Bloomquist, Bob Arends\n\nNot Pictured:: Marvis Okeson Dickinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 – 60 year class\n \n\nPurple and White 1954 Panther Hats made by Jim Quist\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1954 – 60 year class\n\n\nFront Row:  Sylvia Goodsen MacRunnel, Roberta Nelson Swenson, Phyllis Theisen Nelson, Bessie Klose Johnson, Phyllis Gratz Quist, Grace Johnson Peterson, Shirley Nelson Larson\n\nBack Row:  Ruthie Quistad Huisinga Meyering, Rachel Munson Anthony, Kenneth Gratz, Paul Nelson, Jim Quist, Dale Nelson, Jack Tait, Bruce Larson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1959 – 55 year class\n\n\nFront Row:  Karin Johnson, Darlene Kragenbring Bratberg, Jackie Nelson Powell, Peg Tat Condon\n\nBack Row:  Jerry Rossell, Ken Orsten, Rob Paulson , Betty Paulson, Dennis Baker\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 – 50 year class – Golden Class\n\nFront row: Gary Behm, Jeanette Palmer Mayer, Leone Gratz Blommer, Carol Rodekuhr Haviland, Caroline Nelson Eisenreich, Joyce Larson Bjur, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson,\n\nSecond row: Mike Tagtow, Lloyd Urban, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Terre Windsor Holm, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Diana Ackerman Smith, Jane Anderson Taubman, Janice Johnson Bicknell, Doug Beecroft, Don Amdahl, Bill Moll\n\nThird row:  John Williamson, Jon Olson, Wayne Denton, Larry Slinden, Charles Miller, Gerald Larson\n\nNot Pictured:  John Wyman Hovey\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1964 – 50 year class\n\nFront row;  Lloyd Urban, Carol Rodeduhr Haviland, Doug Beecroft, Terre Windsor Holm, Jane Anderson Taubman, Joyce Larson Bjur, Diana Ackerman Smith, Arlyss Knudsen Engelson\nSecond row:  Gary Behm, Wyman Hovey, John Williamson, Wayne Denton, Marlene Hoepner Wittman, Leone Gratz Blommer, Eunice Mahn McBroom, Audrey Narragon Hoppke, Verdell Benson Pelvit, Jon Olson, Mike Tagtow\n\nThird row: Gerald Larson, Bill Moll, Larry Slinden, Stanley Peterson, Lee Elton, Charles Millier, Don Amdahl, Randy Kragenbring\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\nAHS Class of 1974 – 40 year class\n\n\nFront Row: LeAnn Latterell Larson, Bev Sebring Hasbrook, Anne Windson, Zella Tagtow Link, Sheryl Gross Downes, Dennis Peterson, Becky Monson Prieto\n\nBack Row: Tom Kingery, Lloyd Nelson, Donn Peterson, Howard Behm, Paul Hedberg, Roger Johnson, Gary Carlson, Kathy Behm Black, Jim Swenson, Denise Buer Hedberg, Scott Peterson, Kevin Gertgen, Larry Miller, Mark Hutchinson\nPhoto by Denny Baker of Baker Printing in Spicer, MN\n ","Tami Tagtow"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:willmarstudentsfirst.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:repandrewfalk.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":13,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"repandrewfalk.areavoices.com/96","permalink":"http://repandrewfalk.areavoices.com/2013/05/19/house-approves-hhs-budget-that-saves-50-million-through-reforms/","blogid":"7242","blogdomain":"repandrewfalk.areavoices.com","hostname":"repandrewfalk.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"House approves HHS budget that saves $50 million through reforms","content":"Bill includes first increase for nursing home funding in four years\nST. PAUL – The Minnesota House of Representatives approved on Friday night the Omnibus Health and Human Services bill by a 73-61 vote.\n\nThe bill reduces the HHS budget by $50 million over two years through targeted cuts, reforms, and re-prioritization within the budget yet still remains true to the mission of HHS – to protect our most vulnerable and ensure the highest quality of life for Minnesota.\n\nA provision that would have cost rural hospitals tens of thousands of dollars a year has been removed, and the pay increase for human services workers has been increases since the bill originally passed the House. The bill provides for 5 percent rate increase for nursing home providers. Of this total percent, 3.75 percent will go to employee compensation, and 1.25 percent will be tied to a quality assessment. They will receive an additional 3.2 percent increase in 2015.\n\nMany of these improvements are due to a strong push from rural legislators.\n\n“We know that our nursing home workers need more support from the state,” said Rep. Andrew Falk (DFL – Murdock). “This bill gives them a pay increase that is well deserved and it helps make responsible reforms to one of the biggest areas of our budget.  Two years ago, Republicans cut $1 billion from the human services budget.  That kind of cutting isn’t sustainable. Our budget makes responsible cuts and invests in workers who deserve quality compensation.”\n\nLong-term care and home and community-based providers will receive a 1 percent rate increase effective April 1, 2014. They are eligible to receive an additional rate increase based on service quality. And the bill provides for repealing the 1.67 percent rate reduction for long-term care providers that was to go into effect on on July 1, 2013.\n\nIt provides a rate increase for nursing homes and long-term care providers, funds innovative mental health initiatives for children and adults, improves Minnesota’s health care and public health programs and helps thousands of low-income families and children. In addition to the original House bill, the bill makes further investments in child-focused programs, provides Medical Assistance (MA) rate increases for a range of health care providers and lowers MinnesotaCare premiums, among others.\n\nThe combination of some wise cuts and reforms and increased spending is achieved through additional Affordable Care Act (ACA) savings, reducing HMO allowable administrative expenses, and reforming the payment methods for the HMO and hospital surcharges.\n\nThe reforms include reducing allowable HMO administrative expenses, capturing savings from ACA primary care rate increase, reforming the HMO and hospital surcharge process, suspending inflation payments for nursing facilities, capturing rebates for diabetic test strips, fixing MA drug pricing gaps, reducing drug reimbursement rates and maximizing rebates for HIV drugs, increasing DHS audit and recovery capability, increasing county share of cost of care for Anoka Regional Treatment Center and Minnesota Security Hospital patients, eliminating the Alternative to Moose Lake Grant, and recognizing CCAP savings from all-day kindergarten expansion.\n\nIn addition, the bill continues implementation of federal health reform, including a modernizing of MinnesotaCare through the Basic Health Plan, a major opportunity to assert more state-based control over federal health care dollars.\n\nThe bill also:\n\nProvides new and expanded opportunities for treating the mentally ill The bill funds cost-preventive mental health initiatives for adults and children, such as fully-funding the Governor’s request for expanding school-based mental health services and mental health crisis response services.\n\nContinues to implement the Affordable Care Act The House bill removes bureaucratic and wasteful barriers to coverage for Medical Assistance for children and adults. It protects and improves MinnesotaCare for middle class families as part of the ongoing process to implement federal health care reform. Hospitals and health care providers should see a decrease in uncompensated care due to MA expansion and a substantial influx of dollars over the next four years. Recognizing that Minnesota hospitals are expected to see a nearly $1 billion increase in funding over the next four years, the bill includes about $100 million in hospital surcharges. The surcharge allows for a strategic modification of hospital funding in Minnesota, including new incentive payments for every hospital that makes it a priority to serve more “safety net” clients. Even after the surcharge is implemented, Minnesota hospitals statewide are expected to see a four-year, $800 million increase in state and federal funds due to the implementation of federal health care reform.","rawcontent":"Bill includes first increase for nursing home funding in four years\nST. PAUL The Minnesota House of Representatives approved on Friday night the Omnibus Health and Human Services bill by a 73-61 vote.\n\nThe bill reduces the HHS budget by $50 million over two years through targeted cuts, reforms, and re-prioritization within the budget yet still remains true to the mission of HHS to protect our most vulnerable and ensure the highest quality of life for Minnesota.\n\nA provision that would have cost rural hospitals tens of thousands of dollars a year has been removed, and the pay increase for human services workers has been increases since the bill originally passed the House. The bill provides for 5 percent rate increase for nursing home providers. Of this total percent, 3.75 percent will go to employee compensation, and 1.25 percent will be tied to a quality assessment. They will receive an additional 3.2 percent increase in 2015.\n\nMany of these improvements are due to a strong push from rural legislators.\n\nWe know that our nursing home workers need more support from the state, said Rep. Andrew Falk (DFL Murdock). This bill gives them a pay increase that is well deserved and it helps make responsible reforms to one of the biggest areas of our budget. Two years ago, Republicans cut $1 billion from the human services budget. That kind of cutting isnt sustainable. Our budget makes responsible cuts and invests in workers who deserve quality compensation.\n\nLong-term care and home and community-based providers will receive a 1 percent rate increase effective April 1, 2014. They are eligible to receive an additional rate increase based on service quality. And the bill provides for repealing the 1.67 percent rate reduction for long-term care providers that was to go into effect on on July 1, 2013.\n\nIt provides a rate increase for nursing homes and long-term care providers, funds innovative mental health initiatives for children and adults, improves Minnesotas health care and public health programs and helps thousands of low-income families and children. In addition to the original House bill, the bill makes further investments in child-focused programs, provides Medical Assistance (MA) rate increases for a range of health care providers and lowers MinnesotaCare premiums, among others.\n\nThe combination of some wise cuts and reforms and increased spending is achieved through additional Affordable Care Act (ACA) savings, reducing HMO allowable administrative expenses, and reforming the payment methods for the HMO and hospital surcharges.\n\nThe reforms include reducing allowable HMO administrative expenses, capturing savings from ACA primary care rate increase, reforming the HMO and hospital surcharge process, suspending inflation payments for nursing facilities, capturing rebates for diabetic test strips, fixing MA drug pricing gaps, reducing drug reimbursement rates and maximizing rebates for HIV drugs, increasing DHS audit and recovery capability, increasing county share of cost of care for Anoka Regional Treatment Center and Minnesota Security Hospital patients, eliminating the Alternative to Moose Lake Grant, and recognizing CCAP savings from all-day kindergarten expansion.\n\nIn addition, the bill continues implementation of federal health reform, including a modernizing of MinnesotaCare through the Basic Health Plan, a major opportunity to assert more state-based control over federal health care dollars.\n\nThe bill also:\n\nProvides new and expanded opportunities for treating the mentally illThe bill funds cost-preventive mental health initiatives for adults and children, such as fully-funding the Governors request for expanding school-based mental health services and mental health crisis response services.\n\nContinues to implement the Affordable Care ActThe House bill removes bureaucratic and wasteful barriers to coverage for Medical Assistance for children and adults. It protects and improves MinnesotaCare for middle class families as part of the ongoing process to implement federal health care reform. Hospitals and health care providers should see a decrease in uncompensated care due to MA expansion and a substantial influx of dollars over the next four years. Recognizing that Minnesota hospitals are expected to see a nearly $1 billion increase in funding over the next four years, the bill includes about $100 million in hospital surcharges. The surcharge allows for a strategic modification of hospital funding in Minnesota, including new incentive payments for every hospital that makes it a priority to serve more safety net clients. Even after the surcharge is implemented, Minnesota hospitals statewide are expected to see a four-year, $800 million increase in state and federal funds due to the implementation of federal health care reform.","contentnoshortcodes":"Bill includes first increase for nursing home funding in four years\nST. PAUL The Minnesota House of Representatives approved on Friday night the Omnibus Health and Human Services bill by a 73-61 vote.\n\nThe bill reduces the HHS budget by $50 million over two years through targeted cuts, reforms, and re-prioritization within the budget yet still remains true to the mission of HHS to protect our most vulnerable and ensure the highest quality of life for Minnesota.\n\nA provision that would have cost rural hospitals tens of thousands of dollars a year has been removed, and the pay increase for human services workers has been increases since the bill originally passed the House. The bill provides for 5 percent rate increase for nursing home providers. Of this total percent, 3.75 percent will go to employee compensation, and 1.25 percent will be tied to a quality assessment. They will receive an additional 3.2 percent increase in 2015.\n\nMany of these improvements are due to a strong push from rural legislators.\n\nWe know that our nursing home workers need more support from the state, said Rep. Andrew Falk (DFL Murdock). This bill gives them a pay increase that is well deserved and it helps make responsible reforms to one of the biggest areas of our budget. Two years ago, Republicans cut $1 billion from the human services budget. That kind of cutting isnt sustainable. Our budget makes responsible cuts and invests in workers who deserve quality compensation.\n\nLong-term care and home and community-based providers will receive a 1 percent rate increase effective April 1, 2014. They are eligible to receive an additional rate increase based on service quality. And the bill provides for repealing the 1.67 percent rate reduction for long-term care providers that was to go into effect on on July 1, 2013.\n\nIt provides a rate increase for nursing homes and long-term care providers, funds innovative mental health initiatives for children and adults, improves Minnesotas health care and public health programs and helps thousands of low-income families and children. In addition to the original House bill, the bill makes further investments in child-focused programs, provides Medical Assistance (MA) rate increases for a range of health care providers and lowers MinnesotaCare premiums, among others.\n\nThe combination of some wise cuts and reforms and increased spending is achieved through additional Affordable Care Act (ACA) savings, reducing HMO allowable administrative expenses, and reforming the payment methods for the HMO and hospital surcharges.\n\nThe reforms include reducing allowable HMO administrative expenses, capturing savings from ACA primary care rate increase, reforming the HMO and hospital surcharge process, suspending inflation payments for nursing facilities, capturing rebates for diabetic test strips, fixing MA drug pricing gaps, reducing drug reimbursement rates and maximizing rebates for HIV drugs, increasing DHS audit and recovery capability, increasing county share of cost of care for Anoka Regional Treatment Center and Minnesota Security Hospital patients, eliminating the Alternative to Moose Lake Grant, and recognizing CCAP savings from all-day kindergarten expansion.\n\nIn addition, the bill continues implementation of federal health reform, including a modernizing of MinnesotaCare through the Basic Health Plan, a major opportunity to assert more state-based control over federal health care dollars.\n\nThe bill also:\n\nProvides new and expanded opportunities for treating the mentally illThe bill funds cost-preventive mental health initiatives for adults and children, such as fully-funding the Governors request for expanding school-based mental health services and mental health crisis response services.\n\nContinues to implement the Affordable Care ActThe House bill removes bureaucratic and wasteful barriers to coverage for Medical Assistance for children and adults. It protects and improves MinnesotaCare for middle class families as part of the ongoing process to implement federal health care reform. Hospitals and health care providers should see a decrease in uncompensated care due to MA expansion and a substantial influx of dollars over the next four years. Recognizing that Minnesota hospitals are expected to see a nearly $1 billion increase in funding over the next four years, the bill includes about $100 million in hospital surcharges. The surcharge allows for a strategic modification of hospital funding in Minnesota, including new incentive payments for every hospital that makes it a priority to serve more safety net clients. Even after the surcharge is implemented, Minnesota hospitals statewide are expected to see a four-year, $800 million increase in state and federal funds due to the implementation of federal health care reform.","numcomments":0,"author":"State Rep. Andrew Falk (District 17A)","author_s":"http://repandrewfalk.areavoices.com/author/repandrewfalk/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-05-19T20:34:44Z","displaydate":"2013-05-19 20:34:44","displaymodified":"2013-05-19 20:34:44","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["House approves HHS budget that saves $50 million through reforms","Bill includes first increase for nursing home funding in four years\nST. PAUL – The Minnesota House of Representatives approved on Friday night the Omnibus Health and Human Services bill by a 73-61 vote.\n\nThe bill reduces the HHS budget by $50 million over two years through targeted cuts, reforms, and re-prioritization within the budget yet still remains true to the mission of HHS – to protect our most vulnerable and ensure the highest quality of life for Minnesota.\n\nA provision that would have cost rural hospitals tens of thousands of dollars a year has been removed, and the pay increase for human services workers has been increases since the bill originally passed the House. The bill provides for 5 percent rate increase for nursing home providers. Of this total percent, 3.75 percent will go to employee compensation, and 1.25 percent will be tied to a quality assessment. They will receive an additional 3.2 percent increase in 2015.\n\nMany of these improvements are due to a strong push from rural legislators.\n\n“We know that our nursing home workers need more support from the state,” said Rep. Andrew Falk (DFL – Murdock). “This bill gives them a pay increase that is well deserved and it helps make responsible reforms to one of the biggest areas of our budget.  Two years ago, Republicans cut $1 billion from the human services budget.  That kind of cutting isn’t sustainable. Our budget makes responsible cuts and invests in workers who deserve quality compensation.”\n\nLong-term care and home and community-based providers will receive a 1 percent rate increase effective April 1, 2014. They are eligible to receive an additional rate increase based on service quality. And the bill provides for repealing the 1.67 percent rate reduction for long-term care providers that was to go into effect on on July 1, 2013.\n\nIt provides a rate increase for nursing homes and long-term care providers, funds innovative mental health initiatives for children and adults, improves Minnesota’s health care and public health programs and helps thousands of low-income families and children. In addition to the original House bill, the bill makes further investments in child-focused programs, provides Medical Assistance (MA) rate increases for a range of health care providers and lowers MinnesotaCare premiums, among others.\n\nThe combination of some wise cuts and reforms and increased spending is achieved through additional Affordable Care Act (ACA) savings, reducing HMO allowable administrative expenses, and reforming the payment methods for the HMO and hospital surcharges.\n\nThe reforms include reducing allowable HMO administrative expenses, capturing savings from ACA primary care rate increase, reforming the HMO and hospital surcharge process, suspending inflation payments for nursing facilities, capturing rebates for diabetic test strips, fixing MA drug pricing gaps, reducing drug reimbursement rates and maximizing rebates for HIV drugs, increasing DHS audit and recovery capability, increasing county share of cost of care for Anoka Regional Treatment Center and Minnesota Security Hospital patients, eliminating the Alternative to Moose Lake Grant, and recognizing CCAP savings from all-day kindergarten expansion.\n\nIn addition, the bill continues implementation of federal health reform, including a modernizing of MinnesotaCare through the Basic Health Plan, a major opportunity to assert more state-based control over federal health care dollars.\n\nThe bill also:\n\nProvides new and expanded opportunities for treating the mentally ill The bill funds cost-preventive mental health initiatives for adults and children, such as fully-funding the Governor’s request for expanding school-based mental health services and mental health crisis response services.\n\nContinues to implement the Affordable Care Act The House bill removes bureaucratic and wasteful barriers to coverage for Medical Assistance for children and adults. It protects and improves MinnesotaCare for middle class families as part of the ongoing process to implement federal health care reform. Hospitals and health care providers should see a decrease in uncompensated care due to MA expansion and a substantial influx of dollars over the next four years. Recognizing that Minnesota hospitals are expected to see a nearly $1 billion increase in funding over the next four years, the bill includes about $100 million in hospital surcharges. The surcharge allows for a strategic modification of hospital funding in Minnesota, including new incentive payments for every hospital that makes it a priority to serve more “safety net” clients. Even after the surcharge is implemented, Minnesota hospitals statewide are expected to see a four-year, $800 million increase in state and federal funds due to the implementation of federal health care reform.","State Rep. Andrew Falk (District 17A)"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:rovingreporter.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":51,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"rovingreporter.areavoices.com/891","permalink":"http://rovingreporter.areavoices.com/2012/08/14/peru-one-year-later/","blogid":"22098","blogdomain":"rovingreporter.areavoices.com","hostname":"rovingreporter.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Peru: One year later","content":"Why do we travel? What compels a person to leave the familiar comforts of home to strike into the unknown?\n\nFor most, I think, it's pure boredom. You sit one evening absently eating mac and cheese and watching the news and think maybe a new exotic locale with winding dirt paths and spicy foods might cheer you up a bit.\n\nFor me, it took a job loss, a bad economy and the general sense that I had nothing to lose.\n\nRegular readers know the story. I was a reporter at a U.S. daily. I was laid off. I sunk into deep despair, careening into a downward spiral of self-pity and Daily Show reruns.\n\nThen, in the deepest dark corner of my gloom, a shining beacon appeared: A job offer in the dusty Latin American capital of Lima, Peru. I took it without question. The next day, I started this blog. In my inaugural post, I posed the following question:\n... was it random chance that I found a job in Peru while idly browsing international job listings, or was it the grand narrative arc that would bring me from rock bottom into something amounting to self-actualization?\nWell, some time has passed since then. What's the answer?\n\nLet me begin with a small caveat. Those closest to me know that I can be a heartless cynic. I don't believe in ghost stories or hear voices in the wind. I hated The Notebook.  I think things are what they are, and nothing more.\n\nBut even the hardest realist might get a little choked up at what I experienced -- that on my first night in Peru, riddled with the anxiety of a new unknown place, the very first person I met in the doorway of my new home would become the one I'd spend my life with. That her smile and laugh reinvigorated me and filled my heart with joy. That one year and four months later, we would be getting married in the only country we've known together.\n\nIt's a story made to star Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams, but it's real life. Destiny or random event, I don't really give a damn. I'm happy.\n\nThanks, Peru, for a great year.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_897\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"300\"] Me and the special lady in Montreal.[/caption]","rawcontent":"Why do we travel?What compels a person to leave the familiar comforts of home to strike into the unknown?\n\nFor most, I think, it's pure boredom.You sit one evening absently eating mac and cheese and watching the news and think maybe a new exotic locale with winding dirt paths and spicy foods might cheer you up a bit.\n\nFor me, it took a job loss, a bad economy and the general sense that I had nothing to lose.\n\nRegular readers know the story. I was a reporter at a U.S. daily. I was laid off. I sunk into deep despair, careening into a downward spiral of self-pity and Daily Show reruns.\n\nThen, in the deepest dark corner of my gloom, a shining beacon appeared: A job offer in the dusty Latin American capital of Lima, Peru. I took it without question. The next day, I started this blog. In my inaugural post, Iposed the following question:\n... was it random chance that I found a job in Peru while idly browsing international job listings, or was it the grand narrative arc that would bring me from rock bottom into something amounting to self-actualization?\nWell, some time has passed since then. What's the answer?\n\nLet me begin with a small caveat. Those closest to me know that I can be a heartless cynic. I don't believe in ghost stories or hear voices in the wind. I hated The Notebook.I think things are what they are, and nothing more.\n\nBut even the hardest realist might get a little choked up at what I experienced -- that on my first night in Peru, riddled with the anxiety of a new unknown place, the very first person I met in the doorway of my new home would become the one I'd spend my life with. That her smile and laugh reinvigorated me and filled my heart with joy. That one year and four months later, we would be getting married in the only country we've known together.\n\nIt's a story made to star Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams, but it's real life. Destiny or random event, I don't really give a damn. I'm happy.\n\nThanks, Peru, for a great year.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_897\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"300\"] Me and the special lady in Montreal.[/caption]","contentnoshortcodes":"Why do we travel?What compels a person to leave the familiar comforts of home to strike into the unknown?\n\nFor most, I think, it's pure boredom.You sit one evening absently eating mac and cheese and watching the news and think maybe a new exotic locale with winding dirt paths and spicy foods might cheer you up a bit.\n\nFor me, it took a job loss, a bad economy and the general sense that I had nothing to lose.\n\nRegular readers know the story. I was a reporter at a U.S. daily. I was laid off. I sunk into deep despair, careening into a downward spiral of self-pity and Daily Show reruns.\n\nThen, in the deepest dark corner of my gloom, a shining beacon appeared: A job offer in the dusty Latin American capital of Lima, Peru. I took it without question. The next day, I started this blog. In my inaugural post, Iposed the following question:\n... was it random chance that I found a job in Peru while idly browsing international job listings, or was it the grand narrative arc that would bring me from rock bottom into something amounting to self-actualization?\nWell, some time has passed since then. What's the answer?\n\nLet me begin with a small caveat. Those closest to me know that I can be a heartless cynic. I don't believe in ghost stories or hear voices in the wind. I hated The Notebook.I think things are what they are, and nothing more.\n\nBut even the hardest realist might get a little choked up at what I experienced -- that on my first night in Peru, riddled with the anxiety of a new unknown place, the very first person I met in the doorway of my new home would become the one I'd spend my life with. That her smile and laugh reinvigorated me and filled my heart with joy. That one year and four months later, we would be getting married in the only country we've known together.\n\nIt's a story made to star Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams, but it's real life. Destiny or random event, I don't really give a damn. I'm happy.\n\nThanks, Peru, for a great year.\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Eric Ludy","author_s":"http://rovingreporter.areavoices.com/author/ericludy/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-08-15T02:26:32Z","displaydate":"2012-08-14 21:26:32","displaymodified":"2012-08-14 21:31:52","categories":["How I've come to flee the country"],"spell":["Peru: One year later","Why do we travel? What compels a person to leave the familiar comforts of home to strike into the unknown?\n\nFor most, I think, it's pure boredom. You sit one evening absently eating mac and cheese and watching the news and think maybe a new exotic locale with winding dirt paths and spicy foods might cheer you up a bit.\n\nFor me, it took a job loss, a bad economy and the general sense that I had nothing to lose.\n\nRegular readers know the story. I was a reporter at a U.S. daily. I was laid off. I sunk into deep despair, careening into a downward spiral of self-pity and Daily Show reruns.\n\nThen, in the deepest dark corner of my gloom, a shining beacon appeared: A job offer in the dusty Latin American capital of Lima, Peru. I took it without question. The next day, I started this blog. In my inaugural post, I posed the following question:\n... was it random chance that I found a job in Peru while idly browsing international job listings, or was it the grand narrative arc that would bring me from rock bottom into something amounting to self-actualization?\nWell, some time has passed since then. What's the answer?\n\nLet me begin with a small caveat. Those closest to me know that I can be a heartless cynic. I don't believe in ghost stories or hear voices in the wind. I hated The Notebook.  I think things are what they are, and nothing more.\n\nBut even the hardest realist might get a little choked up at what I experienced -- that on my first night in Peru, riddled with the anxiety of a new unknown place, the very first person I met in the doorway of my new home would become the one I'd spend my life with. That her smile and laugh reinvigorated me and filled my heart with joy. That one year and four months later, we would be getting married in the only country we've known together.\n\nIt's a story made to star Ryan Gosling and Rachel McAdams, but it's real life. Destiny or random event, I don't really give a damn. I'm happy.\n\nThanks, Peru, for a great year.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_897\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"300\"] Me and the special lady in Montreal.[/caption]","Eric Ludy"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:newplateaus.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":166,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"newplateaus.areavoices.com/5080","permalink":"http://newplateaus.areavoices.com/2013/05/28/thank-you-good-bye-and-hello/","blogid":"15787","blogdomain":"newplateaus.areavoices.com","hostname":"newplateaus.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Thank You, Good Bye...and hello. ","content":"After two years of articles on places as distant as China to Minnesota to Moldova, and on topics as diverse as law to technology to stories of interesting people, I've decided to discontinue this blog.\n\nBut this isn't an end. It's a beginning.\n\nOver the last couple months, I've built a new website under a new name which will continue to feature the same type of content as New Plateaus. (I also transferred all the content from New Plateaus.) This new site is called The Periphery and can be reached at theperiphery.areavoices.com. I'm excited about the new site and eager to continue to offer thought-provoking material under this fresh start!\n\nPlease subscribe to, or visit, The Periphery to check out the latest pieces. If your newspaper is in the Area Voices network, but doesn't yet subscribe to it on their website, let them know and I'm sure they'll be happy to do so.\n\nThank you for reading New Plateaus and now let me welcome you to the new home of this content: The Periphery. My first piece comes out tomorrow morning about Native American veterans I met over the weekend.\n\n \n\n-Brandon Ferdig\n\n\n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"After two years of articles on places as distant as China to Minnesota to Moldova, and on topics as diverse as law to technology to stories of interesting people, I've decided to discontinue this blog.\n\nBut this isn't an end. It's a beginning.\n\nOver the last couple months, I've built a new website under a new name which will continue to feature the same type of content as New Plateaus. (I also transferred all the content from New Plateaus.) This new site is called The Periphery and can be reached at theperiphery.areavoices.com. I'm excited about the new site and eager to continue to offer thought-provoking material under this fresh start!\n\nPlease subscribe to, or visit, The Periphery to check out the latest pieces. If your newspaper isin the Area Voices network, butdoesn't yet subscribe to it on their website, let them know and I'm sure they'll be happy to do so.\n\nThank you for reading New Plateaus and now let me welcome you to the new home of this content: The Periphery. My first piece comes out tomorrow morning about Native American veterans I met over the weekend.\n\n \n\n-Brandon Ferdig\n\n\n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"After two years of articles on places as distant as China to Minnesota to Moldova, and on topics as diverse as law to technology to stories of interesting people, I've decided to discontinue this blog.\n\nBut this isn't an end. It's a beginning.\n\nOver the last couple months, I've built a new website under a new name which will continue to feature the same type of content as New Plateaus. (I also transferred all the content from New Plateaus.) This new site is called The Periphery and can be reached at theperiphery.areavoices.com. I'm excited about the new site and eager to continue to offer thought-provoking material under this fresh start!\n\nPlease subscribe to, or visit, The Periphery to check out the latest pieces. If your newspaper isin the Area Voices network, butdoesn't yet subscribe to it on their website, let them know and I'm sure they'll be happy to do so.\n\nThank you for reading New Plateaus and now let me welcome you to the new home of this content: The Periphery. My first piece comes out tomorrow morning about Native American veterans I met over the weekend.\n\n \n\n-Brandon Ferdig\n\n\n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Brandon Ferdig","author_s":"http://newplateaus.areavoices.com/author/brandonferdig/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-05-28T12:55:55Z","displaydate":"2013-05-28 07:55:55","displaymodified":"2013-05-28 07:55:55","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Thank You, Good Bye...and hello. ","After two years of articles on places as distant as China to Minnesota to Moldova, and on topics as diverse as law to technology to stories of interesting people, I've decided to discontinue this blog.\n\nBut this isn't an end. It's a beginning.\n\nOver the last couple months, I've built a new website under a new name which will continue to feature the same type of content as New Plateaus. (I also transferred all the content from New Plateaus.) This new site is called The Periphery and can be reached at theperiphery.areavoices.com. I'm excited about the new site and eager to continue to offer thought-provoking material under this fresh start!\n\nPlease subscribe to, or visit, The Periphery to check out the latest pieces. If your newspaper is in the Area Voices network, but doesn't yet subscribe to it on their website, let them know and I'm sure they'll be happy to do so.\n\nThank you for reading New Plateaus and now let me welcome you to the new home of this content: The Periphery. My first piece comes out tomorrow morning about Native American veterans I met over the weekend.\n\n \n\n-Brandon Ferdig\n\n\n\n \n\n ","Brandon Ferdig"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:shiny.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":813,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"shiny.areavoices.com/85797","permalink":"http://shiny.areavoices.com/2014/07/08/remembering-jerry-kainz/","blogid":"1000","blogdomain":"shiny.areavoices.com","hostname":"shiny.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Remembering Jerry Kainz","content":"Sometimes it's hard to say goodbye.\n\nFor me, that applies to a lot of things, including shoes. I'll buy a pair of shoes and, if I like them, I'll wear them in, wear them out, and then keep on wearing them until they literally start to fall apart. In a few cases I've even attempted to glue them back together again just so I can wear them a little more.\n\nI was wearing a pair of shoes a little longer than I should have when I stepped into the Jamestown Fire Department building one evening, and one of the soles had finally given up the ghost, flapping against the bottom of the rest of the shoe and the fire hall floor. I ignored them and looked for a firefighter, so I could get some basic information about a fire that had happened earlier.\n\nIt was Deputy Chief Jerry Kainz who helped me out, but not without pointing out the problem I was having with my shoe and teasing me a bit about it. We both thought it was pretty funny, actually--my shoe was flapping every step I took and I had to be careful not to trip on it.\n\nAfter that, every time I stopped by at the JFD in the evening, I looked for Jerry. Everybody in that fire department is really helpful, but I remembered Jerry because of my shoe. He remembered my shoe too, because just about every time I'd go in there we'd have a bit of banter about whatever shoes I happened to be wearing that day.\n\nAnd Jerry always knew the answers to all my reporter questions, too, and gave neat, organized answers. How many people were at the fire? How many trucks? What did you use to put it out? Any injuries? Is it totally destroyed? What caused the fire?\n\nI was saddened to hear today that Jerry had passed away yesterday. I can't say that I knew him very well, but I absolutely can say that he made me smile, more than once. He made my job easier, more than once.\n\nWhile I never look forward to fires, I never minded going over to the fire hall, and part of that was because I knew Jerry was likely to be there, with both information and a quip about my (occasionally dubious) footwear.\n\nI have since said goodbye to the shoe that prompted the initial exchange. I don't even miss it.\n\nI already miss Jerry Kainz, though--his quick smile, his knowledge and the ready way he shared them both. He made a difference to a great many people through his work with the JFD--saving homes, preventing property damage, saving lives.\n\nBut he also made a difference to me, even with just a smile and a helpful word.\n\nThanks, Jerry. Thank you.","rawcontent":"Sometimes it's hard to say goodbye.\n\nFor me, that applies to a lot of things, including shoes. I'll buy a pair of shoes and, if I like them, I'll wear them in, wear them out, and then keep on wearing them until they literally start to fall apart. In a few cases I've even attempted to glue them back together again just so I can wear them a little more.\n\nI was wearing a pair of shoes a little longer than I should have when I stepped into the Jamestown Fire Department building one evening, and one of the soles had finally given up the ghost, flapping against the bottom of the rest of the shoe and the fire hall floor. I ignored them and looked for a firefighter, so I could get some basic information about a fire that had happened earlier.\n\nIt was Deputy Chief Jerry Kainz who helped me out, but not without pointing out the problem I was having with my shoe and teasing me a bit about it. We both thought it was pretty funny, actually--my shoe was flapping every step I took and I had to be careful not to trip on it.\n\nAfter that, every time I stopped by at the JFD in the evening, I looked for Jerry. Everybody in that fire department is really helpful, but I remembered Jerry because of my shoe. He remembered my shoe too, because just about every time I'd go in there we'd have a bit of banter about whatever shoes I happened to be wearing that day.\n\nAnd Jerry always knew the answers to all my reporter questions, too, and gave neat, organized answers. How many people were at the fire? How many trucks? What did you use to put it out? Any injuries? Is it totally destroyed? What caused the fire?\n\nI was saddened to hear today that Jerry had passed away yesterday. I can't say that I knew him very well, but I absolutely can say that he made me smile, more than once. He made my job easier, more than once.\n\nWhile I never look forward to fires, I never minded going over to the fire hall, and part of that was because I knew Jerry was likely to be there, with both information and a quip about my (occasionally dubious) footwear.\n\nI have since said goodbye to the shoe that prompted the initial exchange. I don't even miss it.\n\nI already miss Jerry Kainz, though--his quick smile, his knowledge and the ready way he shared them both. He made a difference to a great many people through his work with the JFD--saving homes, preventing property damage, saving lives.\n\nBut he also made a difference to me, even with just a smile and a helpful word.\n\nThanks, Jerry. Thank you.","contentnoshortcodes":"Sometimes it's hard to say goodbye.\n\nFor me, that applies to a lot of things, including shoes. I'll buy a pair of shoes and, if I like them, I'll wear them in, wear them out, and then keep on wearing them until they literally start to fall apart. In a few cases I've even attempted to glue them back together again just so I can wear them a little more.\n\nI was wearing a pair of shoes a little longer than I should have when I stepped into the Jamestown Fire Department building one evening, and one of the soles had finally given up the ghost, flapping against the bottom of the rest of the shoe and the fire hall floor. I ignored them and looked for a firefighter, so I could get some basic information about a fire that had happened earlier.\n\nIt was Deputy Chief Jerry Kainz who helped me out, but not without pointing out the problem I was having with my shoe and teasing me a bit about it. We both thought it was pretty funny, actually--my shoe was flapping every step I took and I had to be careful not to trip on it.\n\nAfter that, every time I stopped by at the JFD in the evening, I looked for Jerry. Everybody in that fire department is really helpful, but I remembered Jerry because of my shoe. He remembered my shoe too, because just about every time I'd go in there we'd have a bit of banter about whatever shoes I happened to be wearing that day.\n\nAnd Jerry always knew the answers to all my reporter questions, too, and gave neat, organized answers. How many people were at the fire? How many trucks? What did you use to put it out? Any injuries? Is it totally destroyed? What caused the fire?\n\nI was saddened to hear today that Jerry had passed away yesterday. I can't say that I knew him very well, but I absolutely can say that he made me smile, more than once. He made my job easier, more than once.\n\nWhile I never look forward to fires, I never minded going over to the fire hall, and part of that was because I knew Jerry was likely to be there, with both information and a quip about my (occasionally dubious) footwear.\n\nI have since said goodbye to the shoe that prompted the initial exchange. I don't even miss it.\n\nI already miss Jerry Kainz, though--his quick smile, his knowledge and the ready way he shared them both. He made a difference to a great many people through his work with the JFD--saving homes, preventing property damage, saving lives.\n\nBut he also made a difference to me, even with just a smile and a helpful word.\n\nThanks, Jerry. Thank you.","numcomments":0,"author":"Kari Lucin","author_s":"http://shiny.areavoices.com/author/lucinka/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-09T00:34:17Z","displaydate":"2014-07-08 19:34:17","displaymodified":"2014-07-08 19:34:17","tags":["fires","jamestown","jamestown fire department","jerry kainz","jfd","local","news"],"spell":["Remembering Jerry Kainz","Sometimes it's hard to say goodbye.\n\nFor me, that applies to a lot of things, including shoes. I'll buy a pair of shoes and, if I like them, I'll wear them in, wear them out, and then keep on wearing them until they literally start to fall apart. In a few cases I've even attempted to glue them back together again just so I can wear them a little more.\n\nI was wearing a pair of shoes a little longer than I should have when I stepped into the Jamestown Fire Department building one evening, and one of the soles had finally given up the ghost, flapping against the bottom of the rest of the shoe and the fire hall floor. I ignored them and looked for a firefighter, so I could get some basic information about a fire that had happened earlier.\n\nIt was Deputy Chief Jerry Kainz who helped me out, but not without pointing out the problem I was having with my shoe and teasing me a bit about it. We both thought it was pretty funny, actually--my shoe was flapping every step I took and I had to be careful not to trip on it.\n\nAfter that, every time I stopped by at the JFD in the evening, I looked for Jerry. Everybody in that fire department is really helpful, but I remembered Jerry because of my shoe. He remembered my shoe too, because just about every time I'd go in there we'd have a bit of banter about whatever shoes I happened to be wearing that day.\n\nAnd Jerry always knew the answers to all my reporter questions, too, and gave neat, organized answers. How many people were at the fire? How many trucks? What did you use to put it out? Any injuries? Is it totally destroyed? What caused the fire?\n\nI was saddened to hear today that Jerry had passed away yesterday. I can't say that I knew him very well, but I absolutely can say that he made me smile, more than once. He made my job easier, more than once.\n\nWhile I never look forward to fires, I never minded going over to the fire hall, and part of that was because I knew Jerry was likely to be there, with both information and a quip about my (occasionally dubious) footwear.\n\nI have since said goodbye to the shoe that prompted the initial exchange. I don't even miss it.\n\nI already miss Jerry Kainz, though--his quick smile, his knowledge and the ready way he shared them both. He made a difference to a great many people through his work with the JFD--saving homes, preventing property damage, saving lives.\n\nBut he also made a difference to me, even with just a smile and a helpful word.\n\nThanks, Jerry. Thank you.","Kari Lucin"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:oleandlena.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":25,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"oleandlena.areavoices.com/974","permalink":"http://oleandlena.areavoices.com/2013/09/24/shades-of-american-graffiti/","blogid":"12911","blogdomain":"oleandlena.areavoices.com","hostname":"oleandlena.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Shades of American Graffiti","content":"When I was in high school my Dad decided to buy me a car.  I guess he got tired of me always asking to borrow his, or worried that I’d smash it up or some such thing, although I never put a scratch in any car the entire time I was in high school.  He had a 1957 Desoto at that time.\n\n It had fins the size of airplane wings and looked like it could take off at any moment.  It had automatic pushbutton drive to the left of the steering wheel so it was a cinch to drive – no shifting or popping the clutch (which was fun).  It was a hardtop, so you could be really cool when you were dragging Broadway.  We’d roll down all the windows regardless of the temperature, push the button into gear away we’d go.\n\nBack then it was not a standard feature to have air conditioning in your car – it had to be special ordered.  I vividly remember one very hot, steamy summer night when my Dad had given me his car and a bunch of us girls decided to drag Broadway.  We rolled up all the windows and PRETENDED we had air conditioning so we could be really cool.  How pretentious – and stupid.  All we did was sweat like pigs and besides that we couldn’t hear what the guys were saying to us when we passed.  Duh!!\n\nDragging Broadway was the “Thing” to do back then.  Broadway was about seven blocks long in our city, and the place to be on a Friday or Saturday night.  A good place to burn up a tank of gas, but then it was only 32 cents a gallon back then.  You’d eventually meet up with a carload of guys (that you knew of course), park your car and pile into theirs.  Then it was off to some fast food joint for a coke and a burger, or maybe even out to some back-country road if they happened to have some beer.\n\nThen my Dad decided he would buy me my own car – and THIS is what he bought me.  I didn’t have any input at all – he just came home with this one day and told me it was mine.\n\n\n\nIt was a 1951 Nash Rambler with a six cylinder with a stick shift on the column – the epitome of style, aerodynamics and speed, huh?  I just about died from embarrassment because I thought it was so ugly.  But then, what the hey, it was wheels and  most of my friends weren’t even allowed to borrow their dad’s car.\n\nSo – take what you get and make the best of it.  The thing my Dad didn’t realize though, is what an impression the fold-down seats would make on all my friends!  Okay – get your mind out of the gutter, now!  By this time I was dating Ole, (and he had a 1949 Ford) and most usually we spent our time with several of his guy friends and their girls.  So with fold-down seats it could turn into quite a party – now I TOLD you to get your mind out of the gutter, didn’t I???\n\nI remember one night in particular – very cold and snowing – and the guys had managed to get some Buckhorn beer for $1 a six-pack.  There were Ole and me; his two next-door neighbor girls, Jean and Sue; several of his buddies, Junior, Ronnie, Donnie, and Dennis, and a couple of others girls I can’t even remember at this point.  We all piled into my Little Nash Rambler, Ole popped the clutch and we sped out of town sounding like a little sewing machine, headed for some back-country road to drink that Buckhorn.  When we found a suitable spot we flipped those seats down and all sat in a circle and had a high old time until the Buckhorn was gone.  Needless to say, my car became known as the Party Car, unbeknownst to my Dad who I’m sure didn’t take those fold-down seats into consideration when he bought me that car.\n\nBig Brother had to suffer through a Nash Rambler too, when he went to college.  His was a 1949 up-side-down bathtub.  But it had lots of potential - -\n\nAt one point he and a buddy stored a beer keg in the cavern-sized trunk, ran plastic tubing through the interior of the car up to the dash, and hooked the tubing to a handle so they could draw beer out of the spigot – how convenient, huh?\n\nOf course back in those days the consequences for being a minor consuming consisted of a slap on the wrist and being sent on your way.  Not the case nowadays – fortunately.  When I think of all the things that COULD have happened I cringe and I think of just how lucky we were.  My heart goes out to all the parents who have lost children under these circumstances or any others.\n\nSo car interests continue for us - Ole now has his favorite little '29 Model A coupe that he loves.  The only problem is that Model As were made only for skinny, short people.  You have to turn into a pretzel to get in and out and it's not uncommon to be rubbing thighs as you go down the road.  Then there's the '40 Ford coupe that he's street rodded and on occasion takes to the drag strip to burn a little rubber.  My favorite, though, is the '51 Ford convertible - red with a white top.  It's a big boat, holds 6 people comfortably, and belonged originally to a high school friend of ours, so we've got a long history with that car.\n\nLove, Lena","rawcontent":"When I was in high school my Dad decided to buy me a car. I guess he got tired of me always asking to borrow his, or worried that Id smash it up or some such thing, although I never put a scratch in any car the entire time I was in high school. He had a 1957 Desoto at that time.\n\nIt had fins the size of airplane wings and looked like it could take off at any moment. It had automatic pushbutton drive to the left of the steering wheel so it was a cinch to drive no shifting or popping the clutch (which was fun). It was a hardtop, so you could be really cool when you were dragging Broadway. Wed roll down all the windows regardless of the temperature, push the button into gear away wed go.\n\nBack then it was not a standard feature to have air conditioning in your car it had to be special ordered. I vividly remember one very hot, steamy summer night when my Dad had given me his car and a bunch of us girls decided to drag Broadway. We rolled up all the windows and PRETENDED we had air conditioning so we could be really cool. How pretentious and stupid. All we did was sweat like pigs and besides that we couldnt hear what the guys were saying to us when we passed. Duh!!\n\nDragging Broadway was the Thing to do back then. Broadway was about seven blocks long in our city, and the place to be on a Friday or Saturday night. A good place to burn up a tank of gas, but then it was only 32 cents a gallon back then. Youd eventually meet up with a carload of guys (that you knew of course), park your car and pile into theirs. Then it was off to some fast food joint for a coke and a burger, or maybe even out to some back-country road if they happened to have some beer.\n\nThen my Dad decided he would buy me my own car and THIS is what he bought me. I didnt have any input at all he just came home with this one day and told me it was mine.\n\n\n\nIt was a 1951 Nash Rambler with a six cylinder with a stick shift on the column the epitome of style, aerodynamics and speed, huh? I just about died from embarrassment because I thought it was so ugly. But then, what the hey, it was wheels and most of my friends werent even allowed to borrow their dads car.\n\nSo take what you get and make the best of it. The thing my Dad didnt realize though, is what an impression the fold-down seats would make on all my friends! Okay get your mind out of the gutter, now! By this time I was dating Ole, (and he had a 1949 Ford)and most usually we spent our time with several of his guy friends and their girls. So with fold-down seats it could turn into quite a party now I TOLD you to get your mind out of the gutter, didnt I???\n\nI remember one night in particular very cold and snowing and the guys had managed to get some Buckhorn beer for $1 a six-pack. There were Ole and me; his two next-door neighbor girls, Jean and Sue; several of his buddies, Junior, Ronnie, Donnie, and Dennis, and a couple of others girls I cant even remember at this point. We all piled into my Little Nash Rambler, Ole popped the clutch and we sped out of town sounding like a little sewing machine, headed for some back-country road to drink that Buckhorn. When we found a suitable spot we flipped those seats down and all sat in a circle and had a high old time until the Buckhorn was gone. Needless to say, my car became known as the Party Car, unbeknownst to my Dad who Im sure didnt take those fold-down seats into consideration when he bought me that car.\n\nBig Brother had to suffer through a Nash Rambler too, when he went to college. His was a 1949 up-side-down bathtub. But it had lots of potential - -\n\nAt one point he and a buddy stored a beer keg in the cavern-sized trunk, ran plastic tubing through the interior of the car up to the dash, and hooked the tubing to a handle so they could draw beer out of the spigot how convenient, huh?\n\nOf course back in those days the consequences for being a minor consuming consisted of a slap on the wrist and being sent on your way. Not the case nowadays fortunately. When I think of all the things that COULD have happened I cringe and I think of just how lucky we were. My heart goes out to all the parents who have lost children under these circumstances or any others.\n\nSo car interests continue for us - Ole now has his favorite little '29 Model A coupe that he loves. The only problem is that Model As were made only for skinny, short people. You have to turn into a pretzel to get in and out and it's not uncommon to be rubbing thighs as you go down the road. Then there's the '40 Ford coupe that he's street rodded and on occasion takes to the drag strip to burn a little rubber. My favorite, though, is the '51 Ford convertible - red with a white top. It's a big boat, holds 6 people comfortably, and belonged originally to a high school friend of ours, so we've got a long history with that car.\n\nLove, Lena","contentnoshortcodes":"When I was in high school my Dad decided to buy me a car. I guess he got tired of me always asking to borrow his, or worried that Id smash it up or some such thing, although I never put a scratch in any car the entire time I was in high school. He had a 1957 Desoto at that time.\n\nIt had fins the size of airplane wings and looked like it could take off at any moment. It had automatic pushbutton drive to the left of the steering wheel so it was a cinch to drive no shifting or popping the clutch (which was fun). It was a hardtop, so you could be really cool when you were dragging Broadway. Wed roll down all the windows regardless of the temperature, push the button into gear away wed go.\n\nBack then it was not a standard feature to have air conditioning in your car it had to be special ordered. I vividly remember one very hot, steamy summer night when my Dad had given me his car and a bunch of us girls decided to drag Broadway. We rolled up all the windows and PRETENDED we had air conditioning so we could be really cool. How pretentious and stupid. All we did was sweat like pigs and besides that we couldnt hear what the guys were saying to us when we passed. Duh!!\n\nDragging Broadway was the Thing to do back then. Broadway was about seven blocks long in our city, and the place to be on a Friday or Saturday night. A good place to burn up a tank of gas, but then it was only 32 cents a gallon back then. Youd eventually meet up with a carload of guys (that you knew of course), park your car and pile into theirs. Then it was off to some fast food joint for a coke and a burger, or maybe even out to some back-country road if they happened to have some beer.\n\nThen my Dad decided he would buy me my own car and THIS is what he bought me. I didnt have any input at all he just came home with this one day and told me it was mine.\n\n\n\nIt was a 1951 Nash Rambler with a six cylinder with a stick shift on the column the epitome of style, aerodynamics and speed, huh? I just about died from embarrassment because I thought it was so ugly. But then, what the hey, it was wheels and most of my friends werent even allowed to borrow their dads car.\n\nSo take what you get and make the best of it. The thing my Dad didnt realize though, is what an impression the fold-down seats would make on all my friends! Okay get your mind out of the gutter, now! By this time I was dating Ole, (and he had a 1949 Ford)and most usually we spent our time with several of his guy friends and their girls. So with fold-down seats it could turn into quite a party now I TOLD you to get your mind out of the gutter, didnt I???\n\nI remember one night in particular very cold and snowing and the guys had managed to get some Buckhorn beer for $1 a six-pack. There were Ole and me; his two next-door neighbor girls, Jean and Sue; several of his buddies, Junior, Ronnie, Donnie, and Dennis, and a couple of others girls I cant even remember at this point. We all piled into my Little Nash Rambler, Ole popped the clutch and we sped out of town sounding like a little sewing machine, headed for some back-country road to drink that Buckhorn. When we found a suitable spot we flipped those seats down and all sat in a circle and had a high old time until the Buckhorn was gone. Needless to say, my car became known as the Party Car, unbeknownst to my Dad who Im sure didnt take those fold-down seats into consideration when he bought me that car.\n\nBig Brother had to suffer through a Nash Rambler too, when he went to college. His was a 1949 up-side-down bathtub. But it had lots of potential - -\n\nAt one point he and a buddy stored a beer keg in the cavern-sized trunk, ran plastic tubing through the interior of the car up to the dash, and hooked the tubing to a handle so they could draw beer out of the spigot how convenient, huh?\n\nOf course back in those days the consequences for being a minor consuming consisted of a slap on the wrist and being sent on your way. Not the case nowadays fortunately. When I think of all the things that COULD have happened I cringe and I think of just how lucky we were. My heart goes out to all the parents who have lost children under these circumstances or any others.\n\nSo car interests continue for us - Ole now has his favorite little '29 Model A coupe that he loves. The only problem is that Model As were made only for skinny, short people. You have to turn into a pretzel to get in and out and it's not uncommon to be rubbing thighs as you go down the road. Then there's the '40 Ford coupe that he's street rodded and on occasion takes to the drag strip to burn a little rubber. My favorite, though, is the '51 Ford convertible - red with a white top. It's a big boat, holds 6 people comfortably, and belonged originally to a high school friend of ours, so we've got a long history with that car.\n\nLove, Lena","numcomments":0,"author":"Lena","author_s":"http://oleandlena.areavoices.com/author/karppinen/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-09-24T16:03:02Z","displaydate":"2013-09-24 11:03:02","displaymodified":"2013-09-24 11:03:02","tags":["Cars","Lena","Ole and Lena","Street rods"],"categories":["Lena","Uncategorized"],"spell":["Shades of American Graffiti","When I was in high school my Dad decided to buy me a car.  I guess he got tired of me always asking to borrow his, or worried that I’d smash it up or some such thing, although I never put a scratch in any car the entire time I was in high school.  He had a 1957 Desoto at that time.\n\n It had fins the size of airplane wings and looked like it could take off at any moment.  It had automatic pushbutton drive to the left of the steering wheel so it was a cinch to drive – no shifting or popping the clutch (which was fun).  It was a hardtop, so you could be really cool when you were dragging Broadway.  We’d roll down all the windows regardless of the temperature, push the button into gear away we’d go.\n\nBack then it was not a standard feature to have air conditioning in your car – it had to be special ordered.  I vividly remember one very hot, steamy summer night when my Dad had given me his car and a bunch of us girls decided to drag Broadway.  We rolled up all the windows and PRETENDED we had air conditioning so we could be really cool.  How pretentious – and stupid.  All we did was sweat like pigs and besides that we couldn’t hear what the guys were saying to us when we passed.  Duh!!\n\nDragging Broadway was the “Thing” to do back then.  Broadway was about seven blocks long in our city, and the place to be on a Friday or Saturday night.  A good place to burn up a tank of gas, but then it was only 32 cents a gallon back then.  You’d eventually meet up with a carload of guys (that you knew of course), park your car and pile into theirs.  Then it was off to some fast food joint for a coke and a burger, or maybe even out to some back-country road if they happened to have some beer.\n\nThen my Dad decided he would buy me my own car – and THIS is what he bought me.  I didn’t have any input at all – he just came home with this one day and told me it was mine.\n\n\n\nIt was a 1951 Nash Rambler with a six cylinder with a stick shift on the column – the epitome of style, aerodynamics and speed, huh?  I just about died from embarrassment because I thought it was so ugly.  But then, what the hey, it was wheels and  most of my friends weren’t even allowed to borrow their dad’s car.\n\nSo – take what you get and make the best of it.  The thing my Dad didn’t realize though, is what an impression the fold-down seats would make on all my friends!  Okay – get your mind out of the gutter, now!  By this time I was dating Ole, (and he had a 1949 Ford) and most usually we spent our time with several of his guy friends and their girls.  So with fold-down seats it could turn into quite a party – now I TOLD you to get your mind out of the gutter, didn’t I???\n\nI remember one night in particular – very cold and snowing – and the guys had managed to get some Buckhorn beer for $1 a six-pack.  There were Ole and me; his two next-door neighbor girls, Jean and Sue; several of his buddies, Junior, Ronnie, Donnie, and Dennis, and a couple of others girls I can’t even remember at this point.  We all piled into my Little Nash Rambler, Ole popped the clutch and we sped out of town sounding like a little sewing machine, headed for some back-country road to drink that Buckhorn.  When we found a suitable spot we flipped those seats down and all sat in a circle and had a high old time until the Buckhorn was gone.  Needless to say, my car became known as the Party Car, unbeknownst to my Dad who I’m sure didn’t take those fold-down seats into consideration when he bought me that car.\n\nBig Brother had to suffer through a Nash Rambler too, when he went to college.  His was a 1949 up-side-down bathtub.  But it had lots of potential - -\n\nAt one point he and a buddy stored a beer keg in the cavern-sized trunk, ran plastic tubing through the interior of the car up to the dash, and hooked the tubing to a handle so they could draw beer out of the spigot – how convenient, huh?\n\nOf course back in those days the consequences for being a minor consuming consisted of a slap on the wrist and being sent on your way.  Not the case nowadays – fortunately.  When I think of all the things that COULD have happened I cringe and I think of just how lucky we were.  My heart goes out to all the parents who have lost children under these circumstances or any others.\n\nSo car interests continue for us - Ole now has his favorite little '29 Model A coupe that he loves.  The only problem is that Model As were made only for skinny, short people.  You have to turn into a pretzel to get in and out and it's not uncommon to be rubbing thighs as you go down the road.  Then there's the '40 Ford coupe that he's street rodded and on occasion takes to the drag strip to burn a little rubber.  My favorite, though, is the '51 Ford convertible - red with a white top.  It's a big boat, holds 6 people comfortably, and belonged originally to a high school friend of ours, so we've got a long history with that car.\n\nLove, Lena","Lena"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:sturgis.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":9,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"sturgis.areavoices.com/83","permalink":"http://sturgis.areavoices.com/2011/08/14/83/","blogid":"22671","blogdomain":"sturgis.areavoices.com","hostname":"sturgis.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"","content":"Now, mind you, it isn't Ole and me that are having troubles and problems. Are you kidding? We're back in the campground by late afternoon and in bed by 10 o'clock. Believe me, you don't find trouble like that. We keep our nose clean and stay away from situations that get out of control. Every year there are \"issues\" that take place and of course, this year has had its share.\n\nFirst off, I have to tell you that the attendance, according to the news media, is down about 14-20% this year. It's quite evident by the traffic on the streets, the number of empty vendor spaces and the number of hotels/motels/campgrounds that have had vacancy signs and space available signs hung out. I think this downturn is due to a number of reasons -- first the economy, and secondly, Sturgis is choking the goose that laid the golden egg. Greediness. This sums it up in one word. It's also called price gouging.\n\nLast week Ole and I went into a place called the Night Owl. We ordered one beer and one margarita, which came to $8. The following Tuesday, during the OFFICIAL rally, we went back to the Night Owl and ordered one margarita and one beer. This time it came to $12. You do the math. What percentage of increase is that? Same thing with hotel rooms. A room that normally charges $68/night is now going for anywhere from $130 to $150 a night. Burgers without fries are running $10 to $12. A beer in Sturgis is going for anywhere from $7 to $10 apiece. I don't have a problem with people making a profit, but I really feel this is price gouging and it's showing in the attendance. People are getting tired of this and are spreading out into other areas of the Hills and doing business.\n\nAs I said before, there are a lot of empty vendor spaces in Sturgis itself, but you're seeing more and more vendors spreading out through the Hills where the licensing is much cheaper. They're going to places like Hill City, Custer, Keystone, Aladin and even out into Wyoming. Enough on that - I'm sure you get my point.\n\nAnd of course there are always the tragedies that take place during every rally. Two days ago there was a terrible situation that took place on Hwy. 79 north of Sturgis. There was a biker driving south on 79 just north of Sturgis when a red Honda pickup came up behind him and hit him 4 times from the back, ran him into the ditch and then left the accident scene. There were multiple witnesses to this accident. The biker was airlifted to Rapid City but died the next day. Today, due to the info from the witnesses, the driver of the pickup was taken into custody and is charged with homicide. Upon interviewing the driver of the pickup, the police determined that it was due to road rage.\n\nThen there has been the gang issues. A couple of nights ago the Mongols and the Hell's Angels got into it over some issue and the police had to intervene. No one was killed but there were several people that were taken to the ER due to knife slashes. This took place during the wee hours, or course.\n\nThen there was the issue of the Gypsy Jokers, who are apparently a group of bad guys out of Australia. 30 of them decided to raise trouble down at Mount Rushmore. Just what exactly they had in mind I don't know as it hasn't been published in the paper yet, but 9 park rangers surrounded them and escorted them off the property, guns drawn.\n\nNow, there are advantages to being old and gray and being in bed by 10 o'clock at night. The advantage is that you miss all of this excitement, but then you don't have the blood pressure raises that this sort of stress causes either.\n\nSo today is the last OFFICIAL day of the motorcycle rally, although I'm sure there will be many folks hanging around for a few days yet. We're pulling out tomorrow, heading for Red Lodge, Montana and planning on doing the Beartooth Pass. It's quite a fun trek on a motorcycle - 11,000 feet with lots of \"twisties\"\n\nSo this will be my last official entry under \"Heading for Sturgis.\"  If you're interested in following The Adventures of Ole and Lena just click on this link to see what happens next. http://oleandlena.areavoices.com/\n\nLove, Lena\n\n ","rawcontent":"Now, mind you, it isn't Ole and me that are having troubles and problems. Are you kidding? We're back in the campground by late afternoon and in bed by 10 o'clock. Believe me, you don't find trouble like that. We keep our nose clean and stay away from situations that get out of control. Every year there are \"issues\" that take place and of course, this year has had its share.\n\nFirst off, I have to tell you that the attendance, according to the news media, is down about 14-20% this year. It's quite evident by the traffic on the streets, the number of empty vendor spaces and the number of hotels/motels/campgrounds that have had vacancy signs and space available signs hung out. I think this downturn is due to a number of reasons -- first the economy, and secondly, Sturgis is choking the goose that laid the golden egg. Greediness. This sums it up in one word. It's also called price gouging.\n\nLast week Ole and I went into a place called the Night Owl. We ordered one beer and one margarita, which came to $8. The following Tuesday, during the OFFICIAL rally, we went back to the Night Owl and ordered one margarita and one beer. This time it came to $12. You do the math. What percentage of increase is that? Same thing with hotel rooms. A room that normally charges $68/night is now going for anywhere from $130 to $150 a night. Burgers without fries are running $10 to $12. A beer in Sturgis is going for anywhere from $7 to $10 apiece. I don't have a problem with people making a profit, but I really feel this is price gouging and it's showing in the attendance. People are getting tired of this and are spreading out into other areas of the Hills and doing business.\n\nAs I said before, there are a lot of empty vendor spaces in Sturgis itself, but you're seeing more and more vendors spreading out through the Hills where the licensing is much cheaper. They're going to places like Hill City, Custer, Keystone, Aladin and even out into Wyoming. Enough on that - I'm sure you get my point.\n\nAnd of course there are always the tragedies that take place during every rally. Two days ago there was a terrible situation that took place on Hwy. 79 north of Sturgis. Therewas a biker driving south on 79 just north of Sturgis when a red Honda pickup came up behind him and hit him 4 times from the back, ran him into the ditch and then left the accident scene. There were multiple witnesses to this accident. The biker was airlifted to Rapid City but died the next day. Today, due to the info from the witnesses, the driver of the pickup was taken into custody and is charged with homicide. Upon interviewing the driver of the pickup, the police determined that it was due to road rage.\n\nThen there has been the gang issues. A couple of nights ago the Mongols and the Hell's Angels got into it over some issue and the police had to intervene. No one was killed but there were several people that were taken to the ER due to knife slashes. This took place during the wee hours, or course.\n\nThen there was the issue of the Gypsy Jokers, who are apparently a group of bad guys out of Australia. 30 of them decided to raise trouble down at Mount Rushmore. Just what exactly they had in mind I don't know as it hasn't been published in the paper yet, but 9 park rangers surrounded them and escorted them off the property, guns drawn.\n\nNow, there are advantages to being old and gray and being in bed by 10 o'clock at night. The advantage is that you miss all of this excitement, but then you don't have the blood pressure raises that this sort of stress causes either.\n\nSo today is the last OFFICIAL day of the motorcycle rally, although I'm sure there will be many folks hanging around for a few days yet. We're pulling out tomorrow, heading for Red Lodge, Montana and planning on doing the Beartooth Pass. It's quite a fun trek on a motorcycle - 11,000 feet with lots of \"twisties\"\n\nSo this will be my last official entry under \"Heading for Sturgis.\" If you're interested in following The Adventures of Ole and Lena just click on this link to see what happens next. http://oleandlena.areavoices.com/\n\nLove, Lena\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"Now, mind you, it isn't Ole and me that are having troubles and problems. Are you kidding? We're back in the campground by late afternoon and in bed by 10 o'clock. Believe me, you don't find trouble like that. We keep our nose clean and stay away from situations that get out of control. Every year there are \"issues\" that take place and of course, this year has had its share.\n\nFirst off, I have to tell you that the attendance, according to the news media, is down about 14-20% this year. It's quite evident by the traffic on the streets, the number of empty vendor spaces and the number of hotels/motels/campgrounds that have had vacancy signs and space available signs hung out. I think this downturn is due to a number of reasons -- first the economy, and secondly, Sturgis is choking the goose that laid the golden egg. Greediness. This sums it up in one word. It's also called price gouging.\n\nLast week Ole and I went into a place called the Night Owl. We ordered one beer and one margarita, which came to $8. The following Tuesday, during the OFFICIAL rally, we went back to the Night Owl and ordered one margarita and one beer. This time it came to $12. You do the math. What percentage of increase is that? Same thing with hotel rooms. A room that normally charges $68/night is now going for anywhere from $130 to $150 a night. Burgers without fries are running $10 to $12. A beer in Sturgis is going for anywhere from $7 to $10 apiece. I don't have a problem with people making a profit, but I really feel this is price gouging and it's showing in the attendance. People are getting tired of this and are spreading out into other areas of the Hills and doing business.\n\nAs I said before, there are a lot of empty vendor spaces in Sturgis itself, but you're seeing more and more vendors spreading out through the Hills where the licensing is much cheaper. They're going to places like Hill City, Custer, Keystone, Aladin and even out into Wyoming. Enough on that - I'm sure you get my point.\n\nAnd of course there are always the tragedies that take place during every rally. Two days ago there was a terrible situation that took place on Hwy. 79 north of Sturgis. Therewas a biker driving south on 79 just north of Sturgis when a red Honda pickup came up behind him and hit him 4 times from the back, ran him into the ditch and then left the accident scene. There were multiple witnesses to this accident. The biker was airlifted to Rapid City but died the next day. Today, due to the info from the witnesses, the driver of the pickup was taken into custody and is charged with homicide. Upon interviewing the driver of the pickup, the police determined that it was due to road rage.\n\nThen there has been the gang issues. A couple of nights ago the Mongols and the Hell's Angels got into it over some issue and the police had to intervene. No one was killed but there were several people that were taken to the ER due to knife slashes. This took place during the wee hours, or course.\n\nThen there was the issue of the Gypsy Jokers, who are apparently a group of bad guys out of Australia. 30 of them decided to raise trouble down at Mount Rushmore. Just what exactly they had in mind I don't know as it hasn't been published in the paper yet, but 9 park rangers surrounded them and escorted them off the property, guns drawn.\n\nNow, there are advantages to being old and gray and being in bed by 10 o'clock at night. The advantage is that you miss all of this excitement, but then you don't have the blood pressure raises that this sort of stress causes either.\n\nSo today is the last OFFICIAL day of the motorcycle rally, although I'm sure there will be many folks hanging around for a few days yet. We're pulling out tomorrow, heading for Red Lodge, Montana and planning on doing the Beartooth Pass. It's quite a fun trek on a motorcycle - 11,000 feet with lots of \"twisties\"\n\nSo this will be my last official entry under \"Heading for Sturgis.\" If you're interested in following The Adventures of Ole and Lena just click on this link to see what happens next. http://oleandlena.areavoices.com/\n\nLove, Lena\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Lena","author_s":"http://sturgis.areavoices.com/author/karppinen/","type":"post","publishtime":"2011-08-14T04:05:42Z","displaydate":"2011-08-14 04:05:42","displaymodified":"2011-08-14 04:06:37","tags":["\"sturgis rally\"","Blackhills","Blackhills motorcycle rally","sturgis","Sturgis Motorcycle Rally"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["","Now, mind you, it isn't Ole and me that are having troubles and problems. Are you kidding? We're back in the campground by late afternoon and in bed by 10 o'clock. Believe me, you don't find trouble like that. We keep our nose clean and stay away from situations that get out of control. Every year there are \"issues\" that take place and of course, this year has had its share.\n\nFirst off, I have to tell you that the attendance, according to the news media, is down about 14-20% this year. It's quite evident by the traffic on the streets, the number of empty vendor spaces and the number of hotels/motels/campgrounds that have had vacancy signs and space available signs hung out. I think this downturn is due to a number of reasons -- first the economy, and secondly, Sturgis is choking the goose that laid the golden egg. Greediness. This sums it up in one word. It's also called price gouging.\n\nLast week Ole and I went into a place called the Night Owl. We ordered one beer and one margarita, which came to $8. The following Tuesday, during the OFFICIAL rally, we went back to the Night Owl and ordered one margarita and one beer. This time it came to $12. You do the math. What percentage of increase is that? Same thing with hotel rooms. A room that normally charges $68/night is now going for anywhere from $130 to $150 a night. Burgers without fries are running $10 to $12. A beer in Sturgis is going for anywhere from $7 to $10 apiece. I don't have a problem with people making a profit, but I really feel this is price gouging and it's showing in the attendance. People are getting tired of this and are spreading out into other areas of the Hills and doing business.\n\nAs I said before, there are a lot of empty vendor spaces in Sturgis itself, but you're seeing more and more vendors spreading out through the Hills where the licensing is much cheaper. They're going to places like Hill City, Custer, Keystone, Aladin and even out into Wyoming. Enough on that - I'm sure you get my point.\n\nAnd of course there are always the tragedies that take place during every rally. Two days ago there was a terrible situation that took place on Hwy. 79 north of Sturgis. There was a biker driving south on 79 just north of Sturgis when a red Honda pickup came up behind him and hit him 4 times from the back, ran him into the ditch and then left the accident scene. There were multiple witnesses to this accident. The biker was airlifted to Rapid City but died the next day. Today, due to the info from the witnesses, the driver of the pickup was taken into custody and is charged with homicide. Upon interviewing the driver of the pickup, the police determined that it was due to road rage.\n\nThen there has been the gang issues. A couple of nights ago the Mongols and the Hell's Angels got into it over some issue and the police had to intervene. No one was killed but there were several people that were taken to the ER due to knife slashes. This took place during the wee hours, or course.\n\nThen there was the issue of the Gypsy Jokers, who are apparently a group of bad guys out of Australia. 30 of them decided to raise trouble down at Mount Rushmore. Just what exactly they had in mind I don't know as it hasn't been published in the paper yet, but 9 park rangers surrounded them and escorted them off the property, guns drawn.\n\nNow, there are advantages to being old and gray and being in bed by 10 o'clock at night. The advantage is that you miss all of this excitement, but then you don't have the blood pressure raises that this sort of stress causes either.\n\nSo today is the last OFFICIAL day of the motorcycle rally, although I'm sure there will be many folks hanging around for a few days yet. We're pulling out tomorrow, heading for Red Lodge, Montana and planning on doing the Beartooth Pass. It's quite a fun trek on a motorcycle - 11,000 feet with lots of \"twisties\"\n\nSo this will be my last official entry under \"Heading for Sturgis.\"  If you're interested in following The Adventures of Ole and Lena just click on this link to see what happens next. http://oleandlena.areavoices.com/\n\nLove, Lena\n\n ","Lena"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:senjoegimse.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":40,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"senjoegimse.areavoices.com/155","permalink":"http://senjoegimse.areavoices.com/2012/11/05/senator-joe-gimse-visits-montevideos-friendship-homes-plant-for-meeting-and-tour/","blogid":"22505","blogdomain":"senjoegimse.areavoices.com","hostname":"senjoegimse.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Senator Joe Gimse visits Montevideo’s Friendship Homes plant for meeting and tour","content":"Sen. Joe Gimse and Friendship Homes plant manager Mark McMahan discuss facility operations during a visit on November 1st\nLast week, I met with officials from Friendship Homes and toured their facility in Montevideo.  Friendship Homes specializes in the manufacturing of systems-built and pre-fabricated houses that are sold throughout North America.  In addition to the Montevideo plant, Friendship Homes operates seven other plants throughout the state.  In speaking with the plant manager and production team, I learned that they are planning an expansion before the end of the year.  The additional jobs Friendship Homes creates will mean a great deal to West Central Minnesota.  I would like to thank everyone from Friendship Homes for the opportunity to tour their facility and I look forward to working with them in the future.","rawcontent":"Sen. Joe Gimse and Friendship Homes plant manager Mark McMahan discuss facility operations during a visit on November 1st\nLast week, I met with officials from Friendship Homes and toured their facility in Montevideo. Friendship Homesspecializes in the manufacturing of systems-built and pre-fabricated houses that are sold throughout North America. In addition to the Montevideo plant, Friendship Homes operates seven other plants throughout the state. In speaking with the plant manager and production team, I learned that they are planning an expansion before the end of the year. The additional jobs Friendship Homes creates will mean a great deal to West Central Minnesota. I would like to thank everyone from Friendship Homes for the opportunity to tour their facility and I look forward to working with them in the future.","contentnoshortcodes":"Sen. Joe Gimse and Friendship Homes plant manager Mark McMahan discuss facility operations during a visit on November 1st\nLast week, I met with officials from Friendship Homes and toured their facility in Montevideo. Friendship Homesspecializes in the manufacturing of systems-built and pre-fabricated houses that are sold throughout North America. In addition to the Montevideo plant, Friendship Homes operates seven other plants throughout the state. In speaking with the plant manager and production team, I learned that they are planning an expansion before the end of the year. The additional jobs Friendship Homes creates will mean a great deal to West Central Minnesota. I would like to thank everyone from Friendship Homes for the opportunity to tour their facility and I look forward to working with them in the future.","numcomments":0,"author":"Sen. Joe Gimse","author_s":"http://senjoegimse.areavoices.com/author/joegimse/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-11-05T18:53:16Z","displaydate":"2012-11-05 18:53:16","displaymodified":"2012-11-05 18:53:16","categories":["Economic Development","Government","Jobs","Uncategorized"],"spell":["Senator Joe Gimse visits Montevideo’s Friendship Homes plant for meeting and tour","Sen. Joe Gimse and Friendship Homes plant manager Mark McMahan discuss facility operations during a visit on November 1st\nLast week, I met with officials from Friendship Homes and toured their facility in Montevideo.  Friendship Homes specializes in the manufacturing of systems-built and pre-fabricated houses that are sold throughout North America.  In addition to the Montevideo plant, Friendship Homes operates seven other plants throughout the state.  In speaking with the plant manager and production team, I learned that they are planning an expansion before the end of the year.  The additional jobs Friendship Homes creates will mean a great deal to West Central Minnesota.  I would like to thank everyone from Friendship Homes for the opportunity to tour their facility and I look forward to working with them in the future.","Sen. Joe Gimse"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:september11.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:doubleduty.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":55,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"doubleduty.areavoices.com/275","permalink":"http://doubleduty.areavoices.com/2012/10/04/crash-already/","blogid":"22480","blogdomain":"doubleduty.areavoices.com","hostname":"doubleduty.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Crash, already!","content":"I'm honestly amazed by seeing posts from my friends on Facebook that go something like this:\n\n\t\"[adorable little boy] was so tired he couldn't make it to bed before he zonked out.\" followed by a pic of him passed out on the floor next to bed/couch/etc.\n\t\"[sweet little girl] is a little sleepy at lunch today.\" followed by a pic of her sleeping in her high chair.\n\nI don't get it. My kids run (or crawl) until they are forced to do otherwise. Which partially makes me sad because they are just so darn cute (and quiet!) when they're asleep. See?\n\n[gallery link=\"file\" order=\"DESC\"]\n\nDuring the day it's play, play, play until they are forced down for nap. At night, if it were allowed, bedtime would be 10pm or later. Tired or not, they just don't quit. Collin starts rubbing his eyes, falling over, tripping over toys... Brendan rubs his eyes, grabs anything fluffy he can find and sucks his thumb... But neither of them will let it go.\n\nGuess for now I'll just enjoy every minute spent playing and bask in the quiet when they go to bed at night.\n\nToday's link:\nThe National Association of School Psychologists has a wealth of resources on their website, including this page on motivating young learners.","rawcontent":"I'm honestly amazed by seeing posts from my friends on Facebook that go something like this:\n\n\"[adorable little boy] was so tired he couldn't make it to bed before he zonked out.\" followed by a pic of him passed out on the floor next to bed/couch/etc.\n\"[sweet little girl] is a little sleepy at lunch today.\" followed by a pic of her sleeping in her high chair.\n\nI don't get it. My kids run (or crawl) until they are forced to do otherwise. Which partially makes me sad because they are just so darn cute (and quiet!) when they're asleep. See?\n\n[gallery link=\"file\" order=\"DESC\"]\n\nDuring the day it's play, play, play until they are forced down for nap. At night, if it were allowed, bedtime would be 10pm or later. Tired or not, they just don't quit. Collin starts rubbing his eyes, falling over, tripping over toys... Brendan rubs his eyes, grabs anything fluffy he can find and sucks his thumb... But neither of them will let it go.\n\nGuess for now I'll just enjoy every minute spent playing and bask in the quiet when they go to bed at night.\n\nToday's link:\nThe National Association of School Psychologists has a wealth of resources on their website, including this page on motivating young learners.","contentnoshortcodes":"I'm honestly amazed by seeing posts from my friends on Facebook that go something like this:\n\n\"[adorable little boy] was so tired he couldn't make it to bed before he zonked out.\" followed by a pic of him passed out on the floor next to bed/couch/etc.\n\"[sweet little girl] is a little sleepy at lunch today.\" followed by a pic of her sleeping in her high chair.\n\nI don't get it. My kids run (or crawl) until they are forced to do otherwise. Which partially makes me sad because they are just so darn cute (and quiet!) when they're asleep. See?\n\n\n\nDuring the day it's play, play, play until they are forced down for nap. At night, if it were allowed, bedtime would be 10pm or later. Tired or not, they just don't quit. Collin starts rubbing his eyes, falling over, tripping over toys... Brendan rubs his eyes, grabs anything fluffy he can find and sucks his thumb... But neither of them will let it go.\n\nGuess for now I'll just enjoy every minute spent playing and bask in the quiet when they go to bed at night.\n\nToday's link:\nThe National Association of School Psychologists has a wealth of resources on their website, including this page on motivating young learners.","numcomments":0,"author":"doubleduty","author_s":"http://doubleduty.areavoices.com/author/doubleduty/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-10-04T13:49:39Z","displaydate":"2012-10-04 08:49:39","displaymodified":"2012-10-04 08:49:39","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Crash, already!","I'm honestly amazed by seeing posts from my friends on Facebook that go something like this:\n\n\t\"[adorable little boy] was so tired he couldn't make it to bed before he zonked out.\" followed by a pic of him passed out on the floor next to bed/couch/etc.\n\t\"[sweet little girl] is a little sleepy at lunch today.\" followed by a pic of her sleeping in her high chair.\n\nI don't get it. My kids run (or crawl) until they are forced to do otherwise. Which partially makes me sad because they are just so darn cute (and quiet!) when they're asleep. See?\n\n[gallery link=\"file\" order=\"DESC\"]\n\nDuring the day it's play, play, play until they are forced down for nap. At night, if it were allowed, bedtime would be 10pm or later. Tired or not, they just don't quit. Collin starts rubbing his eyes, falling over, tripping over toys... Brendan rubs his eyes, grabs anything fluffy he can find and sucks his thumb... But neither of them will let it go.\n\nGuess for now I'll just enjoy every minute spent playing and bask in the quiet when they go to bed at night.\n\nToday's link:\nThe National Association of School Psychologists has a wealth of resources on their website, including this page on motivating young learners.","doubleduty"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:lagniappe.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":801,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"lagniappe.areavoices.com/85893","permalink":"http://lagniappe.areavoices.com/2014/06/30/bugging-oug/","blogid":"626","blogdomain":"lagniappe.areavoices.com","hostname":"lagniappe.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Bugging out","content":"As part of our weekday morning routine, Hubby Bryan and I have devised a new form of workout. We call it the Walk and Swat.\n\nOur year-round ritual -- on days when it isn’t snowing, below zero temps or raining heavily -- is to go for a quick walk every morning. We don’t go far, probably about a mile, just enough to get the body moving and muscles stretched out.\n\nOn Monday, as we headed down the street, we suddenly realized we were under sneak attack. Swarms of mosquitoes were lurking just around the corner from our house, and as we passed their headquarters they surreptitiously began their blood-sucking quest. Pretty soon, Bryan was swatting bugs off my back, and I was returning the favor.\n\nWe must have been quite the sight to behold as we progressed down the street, alternately doing body scans and smacking the tiny tiny pests as we spotted them. But it was certainly more of a workout than just walking.\n\nI have to admit to a bit of paranoia where mosquitoes are concerned. In the past, I’ve had the misfortune of several bad reactions to bug bites that have turned into serious infections. Over the last two very dry years, mosquitoes haven’t been much of a worry, but this year I am resigned to covering myself with bug spray. I just didn’t think to do it before our morning walk.\n\nWith the way the mosquito population is booming this year and inability to treat our yard with a hose-end sprayer repellant due to the continued watering ban, I don’t think I’ll be able to venture out to get the mail out of the mailbox without the proper head-to-toe precautions.\n\nAnother thing that is booming this year due to our recent rains is my herb garden. I love to pick the big leaves of basil and scatter them over roasted vegetables or in salads.\n\nMonday is salad day at our house, so each week I’ve been experimenting with different toppings and homemade dressing choices. So far, this lemon dressing is one of my favorites. Since I was out of honey, I used 1 teaspoon agave nectar in its place. Besides on a lettuce salad, it would be good drizzled over roasted broccoli, cauliflower or asparagus.\nCreamy Lemon Vinaigrette \nWhisk together 3 tablespoons Greek yogurt, ¼ teaspoon grated lemon zest, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion, 2 teaspoons honey, ⅛ teaspoon black pepper and ⅛ teaspoon salt.\n\nI hear from my gardening friends that there is also a bumper crop of radishes, so a recent email from Laura Gjerde of Wilmont is particularly timely.\n\n“Don’t know if I’m the Johnny Come Lately to the roasted radish party, but if you’ve never tried them, you should -- a great way to use an early garden abundance,” writes Laura. “Simply cut them in half (quarter the big ones). Toss in extra virgin olive oil to coat. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper and dried thyme leaves; Roast at 450 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. They get very sweet and are really good -- who knew?”\n\nThanks for the tip, Laura. I didn’t know about roasting radishes and will have to give it a try.\n\nIf you’ve got a recipe or method for seasonal produce, be sure to share it by emailing me at brickers@dglobe.com.","rawcontent":"As part of our weekday morning routine, Hubby Bryan and I have devised a new form of workout. We call it the Walk and Swat.\n\nOur year-round ritual -- on days when it isnt snowing, below zero temps or raining heavily -- is to go for a quick walk every morning. We dont go far, probably about a mile, just enough to get the body moving and muscles stretched out.\n\nOn Monday, as we headed down the street, we suddenly realized we were under sneak attack. Swarms of mosquitoes were lurking just around the corner from our house, and as we passed their headquarters they surreptitiously began their blood-sucking quest. Pretty soon, Bryan was swatting bugs off my back, and I was returning the favor.\n\nWe must have been quite the sight to behold as we progressed down the street, alternately doing body scans and smacking the tiny tiny pests as we spotted them. But it was certainly more of a workout than just walking.\n\nI have to admit to a bit of paranoia where mosquitoes are concerned. In the past, Ive had the misfortune of several bad reactions to bug bites that have turned into serious infections. Over the last two very dry years, mosquitoes havent been much of a worry, but this year I am resigned to covering myself with bug spray. I just didnt think to do it before our morning walk.\n\nWith the way the mosquito population is booming this year and inability to treat our yard with a hose-end sprayer repellant due to the continued watering ban, I dont think Ill be able to venture out to get the mail out of the mailbox without the proper head-to-toe precautions.\n\nAnother thing that is booming this year due to our recent rains is my herb garden. I love to pick the big leaves of basil and scatter them over roasted vegetables or in salads.\n\nMonday is salad day at our house, so each week Ive been experimenting with different toppings and homemade dressing choices. So far, this lemon dressing is one of my favorites. Since I was out of honey, I used 1 teaspoon agave nectar in its place. Besides on a lettuce salad, it would be good drizzled over roasted broccoli, cauliflower or asparagus.\nCreamy Lemon Vinaigrette \nWhisk together 3 tablespoons Greek yogurt, teaspoon grated lemon zest, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion, 2 teaspoons honey, teaspoon black pepper and teaspoon salt.\n\nI hear from my gardening friends that there is also a bumper crop of radishes, so a recent email from Laura Gjerde of Wilmont is particularly timely.\n\nDont know if Im the Johnny Come Lately to the roasted radish party, but if youve never tried them, you should -- a great way to use an early garden abundance, writes Laura. Simply cut them in half (quarter the big ones). Toss in extra virgin olive oil to coat. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper and dried thyme leaves; Roast at 450 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. They get very sweet and are really good -- who knew?\n\nThanks for the tip, Laura. I didnt know about roasting radishes and will have to give it a try.\n\nIf youve got a recipe or method for seasonal produce, be sure to share it by emailing me at brickers@dglobe.com.","contentnoshortcodes":"As part of our weekday morning routine, Hubby Bryan and I have devised a new form of workout. We call it the Walk and Swat.\n\nOur year-round ritual -- on days when it isnt snowing, below zero temps or raining heavily -- is to go for a quick walk every morning. We dont go far, probably about a mile, just enough to get the body moving and muscles stretched out.\n\nOn Monday, as we headed down the street, we suddenly realized we were under sneak attack. Swarms of mosquitoes were lurking just around the corner from our house, and as we passed their headquarters they surreptitiously began their blood-sucking quest. Pretty soon, Bryan was swatting bugs off my back, and I was returning the favor.\n\nWe must have been quite the sight to behold as we progressed down the street, alternately doing body scans and smacking the tiny tiny pests as we spotted them. But it was certainly more of a workout than just walking.\n\nI have to admit to a bit of paranoia where mosquitoes are concerned. In the past, Ive had the misfortune of several bad reactions to bug bites that have turned into serious infections. Over the last two very dry years, mosquitoes havent been much of a worry, but this year I am resigned to covering myself with bug spray. I just didnt think to do it before our morning walk.\n\nWith the way the mosquito population is booming this year and inability to treat our yard with a hose-end sprayer repellant due to the continued watering ban, I dont think Ill be able to venture out to get the mail out of the mailbox without the proper head-to-toe precautions.\n\nAnother thing that is booming this year due to our recent rains is my herb garden. I love to pick the big leaves of basil and scatter them over roasted vegetables or in salads.\n\nMonday is salad day at our house, so each week Ive been experimenting with different toppings and homemade dressing choices. So far, this lemon dressing is one of my favorites. Since I was out of honey, I used 1 teaspoon agave nectar in its place. Besides on a lettuce salad, it would be good drizzled over roasted broccoli, cauliflower or asparagus.\nCreamy Lemon Vinaigrette \nWhisk together 3 tablespoons Greek yogurt, teaspoon grated lemon zest, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion, 2 teaspoons honey, teaspoon black pepper and teaspoon salt.\n\nI hear from my gardening friends that there is also a bumper crop of radishes, so a recent email from Laura Gjerde of Wilmont is particularly timely.\n\nDont know if Im the Johnny Come Lately to the roasted radish party, but if youve never tried them, you should -- a great way to use an early garden abundance, writes Laura. Simply cut them in half (quarter the big ones). Toss in extra virgin olive oil to coat. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper and dried thyme leaves; Roast at 450 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. They get very sweet and are really good -- who knew?\n\nThanks for the tip, Laura. I didnt know about roasting radishes and will have to give it a try.\n\nIf youve got a recipe or method for seasonal produce, be sure to share it by emailing me at brickers@dglobe.com.","numcomments":1,"author":"brickers","author_s":"http://lagniappe.areavoices.com/author/brickers/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-06-30T16:16:06Z","displaydate":"2014-06-30 11:16:06","displaymodified":"2014-07-01 15:47:12","tags":["cooking","creamy lemon vinaigrette","food","lifestyles","mosquitoes","roasted radishes"],"spell":["Bugging out","As part of our weekday morning routine, Hubby Bryan and I have devised a new form of workout. We call it the Walk and Swat.\n\nOur year-round ritual -- on days when it isn’t snowing, below zero temps or raining heavily -- is to go for a quick walk every morning. We don’t go far, probably about a mile, just enough to get the body moving and muscles stretched out.\n\nOn Monday, as we headed down the street, we suddenly realized we were under sneak attack. Swarms of mosquitoes were lurking just around the corner from our house, and as we passed their headquarters they surreptitiously began their blood-sucking quest. Pretty soon, Bryan was swatting bugs off my back, and I was returning the favor.\n\nWe must have been quite the sight to behold as we progressed down the street, alternately doing body scans and smacking the tiny tiny pests as we spotted them. But it was certainly more of a workout than just walking.\n\nI have to admit to a bit of paranoia where mosquitoes are concerned. In the past, I’ve had the misfortune of several bad reactions to bug bites that have turned into serious infections. Over the last two very dry years, mosquitoes haven’t been much of a worry, but this year I am resigned to covering myself with bug spray. I just didn’t think to do it before our morning walk.\n\nWith the way the mosquito population is booming this year and inability to treat our yard with a hose-end sprayer repellant due to the continued watering ban, I don’t think I’ll be able to venture out to get the mail out of the mailbox without the proper head-to-toe precautions.\n\nAnother thing that is booming this year due to our recent rains is my herb garden. I love to pick the big leaves of basil and scatter them over roasted vegetables or in salads.\n\nMonday is salad day at our house, so each week I’ve been experimenting with different toppings and homemade dressing choices. So far, this lemon dressing is one of my favorites. Since I was out of honey, I used 1 teaspoon agave nectar in its place. Besides on a lettuce salad, it would be good drizzled over roasted broccoli, cauliflower or asparagus.\nCreamy Lemon Vinaigrette \nWhisk together 3 tablespoons Greek yogurt, ¼ teaspoon grated lemon zest, 3 tablespoons lemon juice, 2 tablespoons olive oil, 1 tablespoon finely chopped onion, 2 teaspoons honey, ⅛ teaspoon black pepper and ⅛ teaspoon salt.\n\nI hear from my gardening friends that there is also a bumper crop of radishes, so a recent email from Laura Gjerde of Wilmont is particularly timely.\n\n“Don’t know if I’m the Johnny Come Lately to the roasted radish party, but if you’ve never tried them, you should -- a great way to use an early garden abundance,” writes Laura. “Simply cut them in half (quarter the big ones). Toss in extra virgin olive oil to coat. Season with kosher salt and freshly ground pepper and dried thyme leaves; Roast at 450 degrees for 15 to 20 minutes, stirring every 5 minutes. They get very sweet and are really good -- who knew?”\n\nThanks for the tip, Laura. I didn’t know about roasting radishes and will have to give it a try.\n\nIf you’ve got a recipe or method for seasonal produce, be sure to share it by emailing me at brickers@dglobe.com.","brickers"],"comments":["I highly recommend wearing 1 or 2 \"bug bandanas\" -- the fabric is impregnated with permethrin, a \"natural\" insect repellent. (Best to hand-wash in cool water and line dry, and wash infrequently.) I swear by them--I've worn them while camping near Ely and got nary a bite (when I get bitten by mosquitoes or black flies each bite swells up the size of a quarter!). Available at REI (where I got mine), and Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/ExOfficio-3153-2061-8050-One-Size-Bugsaway-Paisley/dp/B00FAN8GVW/ref=pd_sim_sbs_sg_3?ie=UTF8&refRID=0CGCD6P5K83A5CD3NMMF\n\nAlso, if/when you do get bitten, take a Benedryl tablet or capsule as soon as possible (but it will also work a day later)--it really helps minimize the itching/swelling of the bites."]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:prairiebusiness.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":137,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"prairiebusiness.areavoices.com/470","permalink":"http://prairiebusiness.areavoices.com/2014/07/best-place-to-work-contest-proves-immense-pride-among-workers/","blogid":"1321","blogdomain":"prairiebusiness.areavoices.com","hostname":"prairiebusiness.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Best Place to Work contest proves immense pride among workers","content":"Wow. Today is the final day of nominations for our inaugural Best Places to Work contest and I'm so impressed at the response we've received so far that I just had to share it with everyone.\n\nAs I type this, we have received 1,779 surveys! (I typically refrain from using exclamation points, but that one was deserved.)\n\nThat's nearly 2,000 people who work at companies large and small in the Dakotas and western Minnesota who were willing to take five minutes to give a shout-out to their employer for doing something right. That's impressive.\n\nMany companies appear to have the support of all or nearly all of their employees, as evidenced by the more than 100 nominations we've received in support of several companies. What are they doing right? We look forward to sharing their tips with you when we unveil the top 25 large companies and top 25 small companies in our September issue.\n\n\n\nFor now, there are still a few hours left to have your say in why you think your business deserves to make the list. Just fill out this employee satisfaction survey and have your co-workers do the same. The more nominations received per company, the better its chances are of making the top 50.\n\nWe know people in our region take great pride in their hard work and in their place of employment. Thanks to all who have participated to this point. Let's keep those nominations rolling in and continue to show it!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"Wow. Today is the final day of nominations for our inaugural Best Places to Work contest and I'm so impressed at the response we've received so far that I just had to share it with everyone.\n\nAs I type this, we have received 1,779 surveys! (I typically refrain from using exclamation points, but that one was deserved.)\n\nThat's nearly 2,000 people who work at companies large and small in the Dakotas and western Minnesota who were willing to take five minutes to give a shout-out to their employer for doing something right. That's impressive.\n\nMany companies appear to have the support of all or nearly all of their employees, as evidenced by the more than 100 nominations we've received in support of several companies. What are they doing right? We look forward to sharing their tips with you when we unveil the top 25 large companies and top 25 small companies in our September issue.\n\n\n\nFor now, there are still a few hours left to have your say in why you think your business deserves to make the list. Just fill out this employee satisfaction survey and have your co-workers do the same. The more nominations received per company, the better its chances are of making the top 50.\n\nWe know people in our region take great pride in their hard work and in their place of employment. Thanks to all who have participated to this point. Let's keep those nominations rolling in and continue to show it!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"Wow. Today is the final day of nominations for our inaugural Best Places to Work contest and I'm so impressed at the response we've received so far that I just had to share it with everyone.\n\nAs I type this, we have received 1,779 surveys! (I typically refrain from using exclamation points, but that one was deserved.)\n\nThat's nearly 2,000 people who work at companies large and small in the Dakotas and western Minnesota who were willing to take five minutes to give a shout-out to their employer for doing something right. That's impressive.\n\nMany companies appear to have the support of all or nearly all of their employees, as evidenced by the more than 100 nominations we've received in support of several companies. What are they doing right? We look forward to sharing their tips with you when we unveil the top 25 large companies and top 25 small companies in our September issue.\n\n\n\nFor now, there are still a few hours left to have your say in why you think your business deserves to make the list. Just fill out this employee satisfaction survey and have your co-workers do the same. The more nominations received per company, the better its chances are of making the top 50.\n\nWe know people in our region take great pride in their hard work and in their place of employment. Thanks to all who have participated to this point. Let's keep those nominations rolling in and continue to show it!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Kris Bevill","author_s":"http://prairiebusiness.areavoices.com/author/kbevill/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-18T20:22:20Z","displaydate":"2014-07-18 15:22:20","displaymodified":"2014-07-18 15:22:20","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Best Place to Work contest proves immense pride among workers","Wow. Today is the final day of nominations for our inaugural Best Places to Work contest and I'm so impressed at the response we've received so far that I just had to share it with everyone.\n\nAs I type this, we have received 1,779 surveys! (I typically refrain from using exclamation points, but that one was deserved.)\n\nThat's nearly 2,000 people who work at companies large and small in the Dakotas and western Minnesota who were willing to take five minutes to give a shout-out to their employer for doing something right. That's impressive.\n\nMany companies appear to have the support of all or nearly all of their employees, as evidenced by the more than 100 nominations we've received in support of several companies. What are they doing right? We look forward to sharing their tips with you when we unveil the top 25 large companies and top 25 small companies in our September issue.\n\n\n\nFor now, there are still a few hours left to have your say in why you think your business deserves to make the list. Just fill out this employee satisfaction survey and have your co-workers do the same. The more nominations received per company, the better its chances are of making the top 50.\n\nWe know people in our region take great pride in their hard work and in their place of employment. Thanks to all who have participated to this point. Let's keep those nominations rolling in and continue to show it!\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","Kris Bevill"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:morris.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":61,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"morris.areavoices.com/84087","permalink":"http://morris.areavoices.com/2014/01/27/getting-cars-off-the-streets-to-plow-snow/","blogid":"720","blogdomain":"morris.areavoices.com","hostname":"morris.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Getting Cars off the Streets to Plow Snow","content":" \n\nWe struggle at the City Staff level trying to figure out the best way to get cars off the street to plow snow.  We have an ordinance that allows us to call a snow emergency and requires all the cars to be off the street, but implementing this system gets to be quite the ordeal.   \n\nThis year is a unique one in that there isn’t a tremendous amount of snow falling, but the severe cold and wind seem to be causing problems.  Last year it was cold, then snow, then rain, then cold, then snow and so on.  It is very hard to continuously call for snow emergencies and process them through each time.  \n\nThe plan for a snow emergency is to call it and then tow any cars left on the street prior to the plows coming out.  The cars are towed to an impound area and the owners aren’t allowed to get their cars back until they pay for the tow, the ticket and an administrative fee.  It isn’t a money maker for the City and because it needs to be done in such a short period of time it winds up being a very difficult thing to do.  Ask anyone who participates in the system.  They don’t like doing it.  This includes the tow truck drivers.  \n\nThe easier thing to do is to use common sense and realize that when it snows you need to move your car off the street so the plows can do their job.  I drove around this morning and found areas with cars parked on both sides of the street.  I’m not sure how the plows got through.  It was obvious that a number of them were still there from when the plows went out yesterday.  We probably should have called a snow emergency and towed.  The next time we probably will. \n\nI realize that many properties don’t have enough off street parking for the people living in the houses or apartments, but they should.  If not on the specific properties, maybe they could find designated areas for parking.  \n\nThe Police Department will probably be issuing citations for vehicles that haven’t been moved once the plow has gone around them.  The City Code allows for the snow emergency to be called, but it also restricts parking on City streets for more than 24 hours.  Usually it is hard to enforce the Code since you need to prove the vehicle hasn’t moved, but that isn’t hard when there is a snow ridge around the vehicle.  \n\nWe all have to use common sense to make this system work.  If it snows, move your vehicle off the road…somewhere.  At least until the plows go by and the road is clear.","rawcontent":" \n\nWe struggle at the City Staff level trying to figure out the best way to get cars off the street to plow snow. We have an ordinance that allows us to call a snow emergency and requires all the cars to be off the street, but implementing this system gets to be quite the ordeal.\n\nThis year is a unique one in that there isnt a tremendous amount of snow falling, but the severe cold and wind seem to be causing problems. Last year it was cold, then snow, then rain, then cold, then snow and so on. It is very hard to continuously call for snow emergencies and process them through each time. \n\nThe plan for a snow emergency is to call it and then tow any cars left on the street prior to the plows coming out. The cars are towed to an impound area and the owners arent allowed to get their cars back until they pay for the tow, the ticket and an administrative fee. It isnt a money maker for the City and because it needs to be done in such a short period of time it winds up being a very difficult thing to do. Ask anyone who participates in the system. They dont like doing it. This includes the tow truck drivers. \n\nThe easier thing to do is to use common sense and realize that when it snows you need to move your car off the street so the plows can do their job. I drove around this morning and found areas with cars parked on both sides of the street. Im not sure how the plows got through. It was obvious that a number of them were still there from when the plows went out yesterday. We probably should have called a snow emergency and towed. The next time we probably will. \n\nI realize that many properties dont have enough off street parking for the people living in the houses or apartments, but they should. If not on the specific properties, maybe they could find designated areas for parking. \n\nThe Police Department will probably be issuing citations for vehicles that havent been moved once the plow has gone around them. The City Code allows for the snow emergency to be called, but it also restricts parking on City streets for more than 24 hours. Usually it is hard to enforce the Code since you need to prove the vehicle hasnt moved, but that isnt hard when there is a snow ridge around the vehicle. \n\nWe all have to use common sense to make this system work. If it snows, move your vehicle off the roadsomewhere. At least until the plows go by and the road is clear.","contentnoshortcodes":" \n\nWe struggle at the City Staff level trying to figure out the best way to get cars off the street to plow snow. We have an ordinance that allows us to call a snow emergency and requires all the cars to be off the street, but implementing this system gets to be quite the ordeal.\n\nThis year is a unique one in that there isnt a tremendous amount of snow falling, but the severe cold and wind seem to be causing problems. Last year it was cold, then snow, then rain, then cold, then snow and so on. It is very hard to continuously call for snow emergencies and process them through each time. \n\nThe plan for a snow emergency is to call it and then tow any cars left on the street prior to the plows coming out. The cars are towed to an impound area and the owners arent allowed to get their cars back until they pay for the tow, the ticket and an administrative fee. It isnt a money maker for the City and because it needs to be done in such a short period of time it winds up being a very difficult thing to do. Ask anyone who participates in the system. They dont like doing it. This includes the tow truck drivers. \n\nThe easier thing to do is to use common sense and realize that when it snows you need to move your car off the street so the plows can do their job. I drove around this morning and found areas with cars parked on both sides of the street. Im not sure how the plows got through. It was obvious that a number of them were still there from when the plows went out yesterday. We probably should have called a snow emergency and towed. The next time we probably will. \n\nI realize that many properties dont have enough off street parking for the people living in the houses or apartments, but they should. If not on the specific properties, maybe they could find designated areas for parking. \n\nThe Police Department will probably be issuing citations for vehicles that havent been moved once the plow has gone around them. The City Code allows for the snow emergency to be called, but it also restricts parking on City streets for more than 24 hours. Usually it is hard to enforce the Code since you need to prove the vehicle hasnt moved, but that isnt hard when there is a snow ridge around the vehicle. \n\nWe all have to use common sense to make this system work. If it snows, move your vehicle off the roadsomewhere. At least until the plows go by and the road is clear.","numcomments":0,"author":"morris","author_s":"http://morris.areavoices.com/author/morris/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-01-27T22:24:31Z","displaydate":"2014-01-27 22:24:31","displaymodified":"2014-01-27 22:24:31","spell":["Getting Cars off the Streets to Plow Snow"," \n\nWe struggle at the City Staff level trying to figure out the best way to get cars off the street to plow snow.  We have an ordinance that allows us to call a snow emergency and requires all the cars to be off the street, but implementing this system gets to be quite the ordeal.   \n\nThis year is a unique one in that there isn’t a tremendous amount of snow falling, but the severe cold and wind seem to be causing problems.  Last year it was cold, then snow, then rain, then cold, then snow and so on.  It is very hard to continuously call for snow emergencies and process them through each time.  \n\nThe plan for a snow emergency is to call it and then tow any cars left on the street prior to the plows coming out.  The cars are towed to an impound area and the owners aren’t allowed to get their cars back until they pay for the tow, the ticket and an administrative fee.  It isn’t a money maker for the City and because it needs to be done in such a short period of time it winds up being a very difficult thing to do.  Ask anyone who participates in the system.  They don’t like doing it.  This includes the tow truck drivers.  \n\nThe easier thing to do is to use common sense and realize that when it snows you need to move your car off the street so the plows can do their job.  I drove around this morning and found areas with cars parked on both sides of the street.  I’m not sure how the plows got through.  It was obvious that a number of them were still there from when the plows went out yesterday.  We probably should have called a snow emergency and towed.  The next time we probably will. \n\nI realize that many properties don’t have enough off street parking for the people living in the houses or apartments, but they should.  If not on the specific properties, maybe they could find designated areas for parking.  \n\nThe Police Department will probably be issuing citations for vehicles that haven’t been moved once the plow has gone around them.  The City Code allows for the snow emergency to be called, but it also restricts parking on City streets for more than 24 hours.  Usually it is hard to enforce the Code since you need to prove the vehicle hasn’t moved, but that isn’t hard when there is a snow ridge around the vehicle.  \n\nWe all have to use common sense to make this system work.  If it snows, move your vehicle off the road…somewhere.  At least until the plows go by and the road is clear.","morris"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:stevenscosheriff.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:minnesotaprairiereads.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":115,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"minnesotaprairiereads.areavoices.com/1374","permalink":"http://minnesotaprairiereads.areavoices.com/?p=1374","blogid":"23470","blogdomain":"minnesotaprairiereads.areavoices.com","hostname":"minnesotaprairiereads.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Job Resource Fair - Greater Alexandria Area","content":"February 5, 2014 9-1pm\nJob Resource Fair\nAlexandria Technical College Law Enforcement Gym\n\nWe have flyers posted at the library listing all the attending businesses.","rawcontent":"February 5, 2014 9-1pm\nJob Resource Fair\nAlexandria Technical College Law Enforcement Gym\n\nWe have flyers posted at the library listing all the attending businesses.","contentnoshortcodes":"February 5, 2014 9-1pm\nJob Resource Fair\nAlexandria Technical College Law Enforcement Gym\n\nWe have flyers posted at the library listing all the attending businesses.","numcomments":0,"author":"Morris Public Library","author_s":"http://minnesotaprairiereads.areavoices.com/?author=32879","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-01-29T01:13:30Z","displaydate":"2014-01-28 19:13:30","displaymodified":"2014-01-28 19:13:30","categories":["What's Going on in the Library"],"spell":["Job Resource Fair - Greater Alexandria Area","February 5, 2014 9-1pm\nJob Resource Fair\nAlexandria Technical College Law Enforcement Gym\n\nWe have flyers posted at the library listing all the attending businesses.","Morris Public Library"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:stevensems.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":7,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"stevensems.areavoices.com/69","permalink":"http://stevensems.areavoices.com/2014/05/13/ems-week-open-house-may-21-4-7pm-in-morris/","blogid":"22946","blogdomain":"stevensems.areavoices.com","hostname":"stevensems.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"EMS Week Open House May 21, 4-7pm in Morris","content":"EMS Week 2014 is next week, May 19-23. This is an annual opportunity for us as an ambulance service to recognize the support of our communities. It is also an opportunity to specifically recognize the dedication and commitment made on an ongoing basis by the many men and women that serve as first responders, EMTs, and paramedics. Here in Stevens County, we have over 100 people that serve as volunteers responding to medical calls for service. These people include first-responders that serve on one of the following first-responder teams: Donnelly Fire Rescue, Chokio First Responders, Hancock First Responders, Herman First Responders, Cyrus First Responders.  These people also include our local fire departments and law enforcement agencies, and the 50+ people that serve as EMTs and Paramedics with the Stevens County Ambulance Service and Ortonville Ambulance Service.\n\nWe invite you to stop down on Wednesday, May 21, from 4 to 7.  We'll have hot dogs and brats on the grill, CPR demonstrations, tours of our new ambulance, fire truck tours, and more! We'll also be recognizing Jim Gillis for his 21 years of service to SCAS and congratulating him on his retirement.  So please stop down and come visit us on Wednesday!  We'll see you then!","rawcontent":"EMS Week 2014 is next week, May 19-23. This is an annual opportunity for us as an ambulance service to recognize the support of our communities. It is also an opportunity to specifically recognize the dedication and commitment made on an ongoing basis by the many men and women that serve as first responders, EMTs, and paramedics. Here in Stevens County, we have over 100 people that serve as volunteers responding to medical calls for service. These people include first-responders that serve on one of the following first-responder teams: Donnelly Fire Rescue, Chokio First Responders, Hancock First Responders, Herman First Responders, Cyrus First Responders. These people also include our local fire departments and law enforcement agencies, and the 50+ people that serve as EMTs and Paramedics with the Stevens County Ambulance Service and Ortonville Ambulance Service.\n\nWe invite you to stop down on Wednesday, May 21, from 4 to 7. We'll have hot dogs and brats on the grill, CPR demonstrations, tours of our new ambulance, fire truck tours, and more! We'll also be recognizing Jim Gillis for his 21 years of service to SCAS and congratulating him on his retirement. So please stop down and come visit us on Wednesday! We'll see you then!","contentnoshortcodes":"EMS Week 2014 is next week, May 19-23. This is an annual opportunity for us as an ambulance service to recognize the support of our communities. It is also an opportunity to specifically recognize the dedication and commitment made on an ongoing basis by the many men and women that serve as first responders, EMTs, and paramedics. Here in Stevens County, we have over 100 people that serve as volunteers responding to medical calls for service. These people include first-responders that serve on one of the following first-responder teams: Donnelly Fire Rescue, Chokio First Responders, Hancock First Responders, Herman First Responders, Cyrus First Responders. These people also include our local fire departments and law enforcement agencies, and the 50+ people that serve as EMTs and Paramedics with the Stevens County Ambulance Service and Ortonville Ambulance Service.\n\nWe invite you to stop down on Wednesday, May 21, from 4 to 7. We'll have hot dogs and brats on the grill, CPR demonstrations, tours of our new ambulance, fire truck tours, and more! We'll also be recognizing Jim Gillis for his 21 years of service to SCAS and congratulating him on his retirement. So please stop down and come visit us on Wednesday! We'll see you then!","numcomments":0,"author":"Stevens EMS","author_s":"http://stevensems.areavoices.com/author/stevensems/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-05-13T21:26:17Z","displaydate":"2014-05-13 21:26:17","displaymodified":"2014-05-13 21:27:54","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["EMS Week Open House May 21, 4-7pm in Morris","EMS Week 2014 is next week, May 19-23. This is an annual opportunity for us as an ambulance service to recognize the support of our communities. It is also an opportunity to specifically recognize the dedication and commitment made on an ongoing basis by the many men and women that serve as first responders, EMTs, and paramedics. Here in Stevens County, we have over 100 people that serve as volunteers responding to medical calls for service. These people include first-responders that serve on one of the following first-responder teams: Donnelly Fire Rescue, Chokio First Responders, Hancock First Responders, Herman First Responders, Cyrus First Responders.  These people also include our local fire departments and law enforcement agencies, and the 50+ people that serve as EMTs and Paramedics with the Stevens County Ambulance Service and Ortonville Ambulance Service.\n\nWe invite you to stop down on Wednesday, May 21, from 4 to 7.  We'll have hot dogs and brats on the grill, CPR demonstrations, tours of our new ambulance, fire truck tours, and more! We'll also be recognizing Jim Gillis for his 21 years of service to SCAS and congratulating him on his retirement.  So please stop down and come visit us on Wednesday!  We'll see you then!","Stevens EMS"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:mahsffa.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":4,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"mahsffa.areavoices.com/31","permalink":"http://mahsffa.areavoices.com/2011/12/10/december-merry-christmas/","blogid":"23753","blogdomain":"mahsffa.areavoices.com","hostname":"mahsffa.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"December- Merry Christmas!","content":"December happenings:\n\nChristmas Party- The Christmas Party will be at the bowling alley in Morris on December 14th at 6:30 p.m. FFAer's have some pizza and try your hand at a game of bowling!\n\nFFA Fruit: FFA Fruit orders will be in on Friday the 9th of December, FFA members and parents please pick up your orders before 8 p.m. that day!\nHave a safe and happy holiday season! 10 We Wish You A Merry Christmas (click me to play a little holiday cheer! :))\n\nChristmas Letter:\n\nHere is what has been happening in the last year!\n\nWinter Trip/ Ag in the Classroom\n\nWe went to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area this spring on a Thursday night for our annual Ag in the Classroom which took place the following day. For this, we taught at three different schools in downtown St. Paul. This was a major experience once again for the FFA members—to be in the city teaching agriculture to children aging from Kindergarten to sixth grade. The FFA members that raised enough money for winter trip spent the night again, and the next day was spent shopping at MOA in the morning and then went to the Minnesota Wilds game in the afternoon. After the game we traveled home.\nGreenhouse/Garden\nThis year something new which we are excited to share is the greenhouse being built as well as the garden started. This first year was the year to get everything up and going. The Ag Department at the school dealt mainly with this and without them, we would not have been able to get it set up and growing at the pace we did. The greenhouse sold many plants and the garden is getting a start. We are excited to continue to perfect the procedures of running this. The picture below is the tomato plants that were planted and sold by the Ag Department.\n\nAlumni Auction\n\nIn February, the Alumni set up a work auction for all the Morris and Hancock FFA students. The students were auctioned off to work for people at 2, 4, 6, or 8 hour intervals. This turned out to be very successful for the fundraising of the Alumni Chapter. We are hoping to do it again next year!\n\nState Convention\n\nWe had a total of  about 60 members that made it to state in 14 different contests. Also, a few members taught a workshop on our Ag in the Classroom curriculum.\n\nAt state we received 2nd for the National chapter application. Receiving State Degree’s this year were Natalie Johnston, Kaitlin VanHorn, Tyler Van Eps, Kendra Sperr, Amanda Moser, Larissa Schmidgall, Eric Wulf, Taylor Hufford, Kelly Mahoney, and Rachel Moser.\n\nAg Department Renovation\n\nOver the summer the Ag Department did a major renovation. We now have a welding shop, a woods shop, and two Ag classrooms. We had an auction to clean up the left over old equipment, as well as an open house this summer.\nNew Ag Teacher/Advisor\nNew this year to the Morris Area is Ag teacher and FFA advisor Nick Milbrandt. We welcome him to the chapter!\n\nNationals\n\nThis year we had two teams qualify for National Convention. The Ag Issues team was carried by Eric Wulf, Brady Wulf, Tony Domnick, Brooke Wente, Marti Koehl, and Rachel Moser. On the Market Plan team was Xochil Mendez, Steph Hennen, and Beth Holland. We congratulate the Ag Issues and Market Plan team in their success!\n\nKiddie Barn\n\nWith a major portion of help from the FFA Alumni, the Kiddie Barn at the county fair was redone and is now a little farmhands operation. This will be a more hands-on experience for the little fair goers. It is packed with tid-bits of information on agriculture. Without the Alumni’s help and funding, we would never have been able to make this renovation possible. They were in charge of designing and recruiting people to build it. We are very thankful to have such an awesome Alumni Chapter!\n\nSummer Camps/Conferences\n\nThe Washington Leadership Conference was held June 20-26th. The Alumni sponsored both Larissa Schmidgall and Levi Carter (Hancock FFA Chapter) to make this trip possible for both of them. From the Morris Area, three were sent to SLCCL (State Leadership Conference for Chapter Leaders). They were Brooke Wente, Shauna Kill, and Steph Hennen. The five that went to SGLC (State Greenhand Leadership Conference), were Brady Wulf, Beth Holland, Chelsey Ehleringer, Melanie Van Horn, and Matt Athey. At these camps, members learn how to become a better leader, and how to build personal character.\n\n Officer Retreat\n\nThe officers went up to Lake Darling the first part of June for a night to prepare for the year ahead of them. They also did a few team building activities to learn to work together in a fun way.\n\n Corn Drive\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nMonsanto 2012 Chapter Challenge\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nLike last year, we are doing the FFA Chapter Challenge. This is a very easy way to win money, just by making connections with our local farmers. We have included in our Christmas letter this year a slip with directions to help us out with this. All you need to do is go online and vote for our chapter. Last year we placed in the top ten, and won $2,500. Also, Ace Sperr won the Chapter Challenge, and donated the money he received to us. Please help us out again this year! J\n\nPALS\n\nWe are still doing our pals program for the first graders, each flex period. This program is a curriculum that we have been adding to every year to give each year’s first graders the agriculture experience. To some, even introduce them to agriculture.\n\n\n\n\n\nThank you for your support of the Morris Area FFA Chapter!!\n\n\n\n\n\n2011-2012 Chapter Officers\nThis year’s chapter officers are as follows:\n President: Jake Moser\n\nVice President: Lloyd Lesmeister\n\nSecretary: Kaitlin Van Horn\n\nDirector: Brooke Wente\n\nReporter: Larissa Schmidgall\n\n\n Treasurer: Tom Holland\n\nParliamentarian: Steph Hennen\n\nSentinel: Brady Wulf\n\n \n\n","rawcontent":"December happenings:\n\nChristmas Party- The Christmas Party will be at the bowling alley in Morris on December 14th at 6:30 p.m. FFAer's have some pizza and try your hand at a game of bowling!\n\nFFA Fruit: FFA Fruit orders will be in on Friday the 9th of December, FFA members and parents please pick up your orders before 8 p.m. that day!\nHave a safe and happy holiday season!10 We Wish You A Merry Christmas(click me to play a little holiday cheer! :))\n\nChristmas Letter:\n\nHere is what has been happening in the last year!\n\nWinter Trip/ Ag in the Classroom\n\nWe went to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area this spring on a Thursday night for our annual Ag in the Classroom which took place the following day. For this, we taught at three different schools in downtown St. Paul. This was a major experience once again for the FFA membersto be in the city teaching agriculture to children aging from Kindergarten to sixth grade. The FFA members that raised enough money for winter trip spent the night again, and the next day was spent shopping at MOA in the morning and then went to the Minnesota Wilds game in the afternoon. After the game we traveled home.\nGreenhouse/Garden\nThis year something new which we are excited to share is the greenhouse being built as well as the garden started. This first year was the year to get everything up and going. The Ag Department at the school dealt mainly with this and without them, we would not have been able to get it set up and growing at the pace we did. The greenhouse sold many plants and the garden is getting a start. We are excited to continue to perfect the procedures of running this. The picture below is the tomato plants that were planted and sold by the Ag Department.\n\nAlumni Auction\n\nIn February, the Alumni set up a work auction for all the Morris and Hancock FFA students. The students were auctioned off to work for people at 2, 4, 6, or 8 hour intervals. This turned out to be very successful for the fundraising of the Alumni Chapter. We are hoping to do it again next year!\n\nState Convention\n\nWe had a total of about 60 members that made it to state in 14 different contests. Also, a few members taught a workshop on our Ag in the Classroom curriculum.\n\nAt state we received 2ndfor the National chapter application. Receiving State Degrees this year were Natalie Johnston, Kaitlin VanHorn, Tyler Van Eps, Kendra Sperr, Amanda Moser, Larissa Schmidgall, Eric Wulf, Taylor Hufford, Kelly Mahoney, and Rachel Moser.\n\nAg Department Renovation\n\nOver the summer the Ag Department did a major renovation. We now have a welding shop, a woods shop, and two Ag classrooms. We had an auction to clean up the left over old equipment, as well as an open house this summer.\nNew Ag Teacher/Advisor\nNew this year to the Morris Area is Ag teacher and FFA advisor Nick Milbrandt. We welcome him to the chapter!\n\nNationals\n\nThis year we had two teams qualify for National Convention. The Ag Issues team was carried by Eric Wulf, Brady Wulf, Tony Domnick, Brooke Wente, Marti Koehl, and Rachel Moser. On the Market Plan team was Xochil Mendez, Steph Hennen, and Beth Holland. We congratulate the Ag Issues and Market Plan team in their success!\n\nKiddie Barn\n\nWith a major portion of help from the FFA Alumni, the Kiddie Barn at the county fair was redone and is now a little farmhands operation. This will be a more hands-on experience for the little fair goers. It is packed with tid-bits of information on agriculture. Without the Alumnis help and funding, we would never have been able to make this renovation possible. They were in charge of designing and recruiting people to build it. We are very thankful to have such an awesome Alumni Chapter!\n\nSummer Camps/Conferences\n\nThe Washington Leadership Conference was held June 20-26th. The Alumni sponsored both Larissa Schmidgall and Levi Carter (Hancock FFA Chapter) to make this trip possible for both of them. From the Morris Area, three were sent to SLCCL (State Leadership Conference for Chapter Leaders). They were Brooke Wente, Shauna Kill, and Steph Hennen. The five that went to SGLC (State Greenhand Leadership Conference), were Brady Wulf, Beth Holland, Chelsey Ehleringer, Melanie Van Horn, and Matt Athey. At these camps, members learn how to become a better leader, and how to build personal character.\n\nOfficer Retreat\n\nThe officers went up to Lake Darling the first part of June for a night to prepare for the year ahead of them. They also did a few team building activities to learn to work together in a fun way.\n\nCorn Drive\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nMonsanto 2012 Chapter Challenge\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nLike last year, we are doing the FFA Chapter Challenge. This is a very easy way to win money, just by making connections with our local farmers. We have included in our Christmas letter this year a slip with directions to help us out with this. All you need to do is go online and vote for our chapter. Last year we placed in the top ten, and won $2,500. Also, Ace Sperr won the Chapter Challenge, and donated the money he received to us. Please help us out again this year! J\n\nPALS\n\nWe are still doing our pals program for the first graders, each flex period. This program is a curriculum that we have been adding to every year to give each years first graders the agriculture experience. To some, even introduce them to agriculture.\n\n\n\n\n\nThank you for your support of the Morris Area FFA Chapter!!\n\n\n\n\n\n2011-2012 Chapter Officers\nThis years chapter officers are as follows:\nPresident: JakeMoser\n\nVice President: LloydLesmeister\n\nSecretary: Kaitlin Van Horn\n\nDirector: Brooke Wente\n\nReporter: Larissa Schmidgall\n\n\nTreasurer: Tom Holland\n\nParliamentarian: Steph Hennen\n\nSentinel:Brady Wulf\n\n \n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"December happenings:\n\nChristmas Party- The Christmas Party will be at the bowling alley in Morris on December 14th at 6:30 p.m. FFAer's have some pizza and try your hand at a game of bowling!\n\nFFA Fruit: FFA Fruit orders will be in on Friday the 9th of December, FFA members and parents please pick up your orders before 8 p.m. that day!\nHave a safe and happy holiday season!10 We Wish You A Merry Christmas(click me to play a little holiday cheer! :))\n\nChristmas Letter:\n\nHere is what has been happening in the last year!\n\nWinter Trip/ Ag in the Classroom\n\nWe went to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area this spring on a Thursday night for our annual Ag in the Classroom which took place the following day. For this, we taught at three different schools in downtown St. Paul. This was a major experience once again for the FFA membersto be in the city teaching agriculture to children aging from Kindergarten to sixth grade. The FFA members that raised enough money for winter trip spent the night again, and the next day was spent shopping at MOA in the morning and then went to the Minnesota Wilds game in the afternoon. After the game we traveled home.\nGreenhouse/Garden\nThis year something new which we are excited to share is the greenhouse being built as well as the garden started. This first year was the year to get everything up and going. The Ag Department at the school dealt mainly with this and without them, we would not have been able to get it set up and growing at the pace we did. The greenhouse sold many plants and the garden is getting a start. We are excited to continue to perfect the procedures of running this. The picture below is the tomato plants that were planted and sold by the Ag Department.\n\nAlumni Auction\n\nIn February, the Alumni set up a work auction for all the Morris and Hancock FFA students. The students were auctioned off to work for people at 2, 4, 6, or 8 hour intervals. This turned out to be very successful for the fundraising of the Alumni Chapter. We are hoping to do it again next year!\n\nState Convention\n\nWe had a total of about 60 members that made it to state in 14 different contests. Also, a few members taught a workshop on our Ag in the Classroom curriculum.\n\nAt state we received 2ndfor the National chapter application. Receiving State Degrees this year were Natalie Johnston, Kaitlin VanHorn, Tyler Van Eps, Kendra Sperr, Amanda Moser, Larissa Schmidgall, Eric Wulf, Taylor Hufford, Kelly Mahoney, and Rachel Moser.\n\nAg Department Renovation\n\nOver the summer the Ag Department did a major renovation. We now have a welding shop, a woods shop, and two Ag classrooms. We had an auction to clean up the left over old equipment, as well as an open house this summer.\nNew Ag Teacher/Advisor\nNew this year to the Morris Area is Ag teacher and FFA advisor Nick Milbrandt. We welcome him to the chapter!\n\nNationals\n\nThis year we had two teams qualify for National Convention. The Ag Issues team was carried by Eric Wulf, Brady Wulf, Tony Domnick, Brooke Wente, Marti Koehl, and Rachel Moser. On the Market Plan team was Xochil Mendez, Steph Hennen, and Beth Holland. We congratulate the Ag Issues and Market Plan team in their success!\n\nKiddie Barn\n\nWith a major portion of help from the FFA Alumni, the Kiddie Barn at the county fair was redone and is now a little farmhands operation. This will be a more hands-on experience for the little fair goers. It is packed with tid-bits of information on agriculture. Without the Alumnis help and funding, we would never have been able to make this renovation possible. They were in charge of designing and recruiting people to build it. We are very thankful to have such an awesome Alumni Chapter!\n\nSummer Camps/Conferences\n\nThe Washington Leadership Conference was held June 20-26th. The Alumni sponsored both Larissa Schmidgall and Levi Carter (Hancock FFA Chapter) to make this trip possible for both of them. From the Morris Area, three were sent to SLCCL (State Leadership Conference for Chapter Leaders). They were Brooke Wente, Shauna Kill, and Steph Hennen. The five that went to SGLC (State Greenhand Leadership Conference), were Brady Wulf, Beth Holland, Chelsey Ehleringer, Melanie Van Horn, and Matt Athey. At these camps, members learn how to become a better leader, and how to build personal character.\n\nOfficer Retreat\n\nThe officers went up to Lake Darling the first part of June for a night to prepare for the year ahead of them. They also did a few team building activities to learn to work together in a fun way.\n\nCorn Drive\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nMonsanto 2012 Chapter Challenge\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nLike last year, we are doing the FFA Chapter Challenge. This is a very easy way to win money, just by making connections with our local farmers. We have included in our Christmas letter this year a slip with directions to help us out with this. All you need to do is go online and vote for our chapter. Last year we placed in the top ten, and won $2,500. Also, Ace Sperr won the Chapter Challenge, and donated the money he received to us. Please help us out again this year! J\n\nPALS\n\nWe are still doing our pals program for the first graders, each flex period. This program is a curriculum that we have been adding to every year to give each years first graders the agriculture experience. To some, even introduce them to agriculture.\n\n\n\n\n\nThank you for your support of the Morris Area FFA Chapter!!\n\n\n\n\n\n2011-2012 Chapter Officers\nThis years chapter officers are as follows:\nPresident: JakeMoser\n\nVice President: LloydLesmeister\n\nSecretary: Kaitlin Van Horn\n\nDirector: Brooke Wente\n\nReporter: Larissa Schmidgall\n\n\nTreasurer: Tom Holland\n\nParliamentarian: Steph Hennen\n\nSentinel:Brady Wulf\n\n \n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Morris Area FFA","author_s":"http://mahsffa.areavoices.com/author/morrisareaffa/","type":"post","publishtime":"2011-12-10T05:29:57Z","displaydate":"2011-12-10 05:29:57","displaymodified":"2011-12-10 05:29:57","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["December- Merry Christmas!","December happenings:\n\nChristmas Party- The Christmas Party will be at the bowling alley in Morris on December 14th at 6:30 p.m. FFAer's have some pizza and try your hand at a game of bowling!\n\nFFA Fruit: FFA Fruit orders will be in on Friday the 9th of December, FFA members and parents please pick up your orders before 8 p.m. that day!\nHave a safe and happy holiday season! 10 We Wish You A Merry Christmas (click me to play a little holiday cheer! :))\n\nChristmas Letter:\n\nHere is what has been happening in the last year!\n\nWinter Trip/ Ag in the Classroom\n\nWe went to the Minneapolis/St. Paul area this spring on a Thursday night for our annual Ag in the Classroom which took place the following day. For this, we taught at three different schools in downtown St. Paul. This was a major experience once again for the FFA members—to be in the city teaching agriculture to children aging from Kindergarten to sixth grade. The FFA members that raised enough money for winter trip spent the night again, and the next day was spent shopping at MOA in the morning and then went to the Minnesota Wilds game in the afternoon. After the game we traveled home.\nGreenhouse/Garden\nThis year something new which we are excited to share is the greenhouse being built as well as the garden started. This first year was the year to get everything up and going. The Ag Department at the school dealt mainly with this and without them, we would not have been able to get it set up and growing at the pace we did. The greenhouse sold many plants and the garden is getting a start. We are excited to continue to perfect the procedures of running this. The picture below is the tomato plants that were planted and sold by the Ag Department.\n\nAlumni Auction\n\nIn February, the Alumni set up a work auction for all the Morris and Hancock FFA students. The students were auctioned off to work for people at 2, 4, 6, or 8 hour intervals. This turned out to be very successful for the fundraising of the Alumni Chapter. We are hoping to do it again next year!\n\nState Convention\n\nWe had a total of  about 60 members that made it to state in 14 different contests. Also, a few members taught a workshop on our Ag in the Classroom curriculum.\n\nAt state we received 2nd for the National chapter application. Receiving State Degree’s this year were Natalie Johnston, Kaitlin VanHorn, Tyler Van Eps, Kendra Sperr, Amanda Moser, Larissa Schmidgall, Eric Wulf, Taylor Hufford, Kelly Mahoney, and Rachel Moser.\n\nAg Department Renovation\n\nOver the summer the Ag Department did a major renovation. We now have a welding shop, a woods shop, and two Ag classrooms. We had an auction to clean up the left over old equipment, as well as an open house this summer.\nNew Ag Teacher/Advisor\nNew this year to the Morris Area is Ag teacher and FFA advisor Nick Milbrandt. We welcome him to the chapter!\n\nNationals\n\nThis year we had two teams qualify for National Convention. The Ag Issues team was carried by Eric Wulf, Brady Wulf, Tony Domnick, Brooke Wente, Marti Koehl, and Rachel Moser. On the Market Plan team was Xochil Mendez, Steph Hennen, and Beth Holland. We congratulate the Ag Issues and Market Plan team in their success!\n\nKiddie Barn\n\nWith a major portion of help from the FFA Alumni, the Kiddie Barn at the county fair was redone and is now a little farmhands operation. This will be a more hands-on experience for the little fair goers. It is packed with tid-bits of information on agriculture. Without the Alumni’s help and funding, we would never have been able to make this renovation possible. They were in charge of designing and recruiting people to build it. We are very thankful to have such an awesome Alumni Chapter!\n\nSummer Camps/Conferences\n\nThe Washington Leadership Conference was held June 20-26th. The Alumni sponsored both Larissa Schmidgall and Levi Carter (Hancock FFA Chapter) to make this trip possible for both of them. From the Morris Area, three were sent to SLCCL (State Leadership Conference for Chapter Leaders). They were Brooke Wente, Shauna Kill, and Steph Hennen. The five that went to SGLC (State Greenhand Leadership Conference), were Brady Wulf, Beth Holland, Chelsey Ehleringer, Melanie Van Horn, and Matt Athey. At these camps, members learn how to become a better leader, and how to build personal character.\n\n Officer Retreat\n\nThe officers went up to Lake Darling the first part of June for a night to prepare for the year ahead of them. They also did a few team building activities to learn to work together in a fun way.\n\n Corn Drive\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nMonsanto 2012 Chapter Challenge\n\nThis year was a better year for the corn drive than the last couple years have been. We made a very sufficient amount of profit. We are very thankful to have such supportive farmers in our community. Without them, this fundraiser would be impossible. Because we made more than usual, we are using the excess money to give back to the community. Other than Camp Courage, we have pin-pointed a few places to give to. A few of these areas are: Someplace Safe, the Courage Cottage, MAHS emergency fund, suicide prevention speaker, horticulture garden, and the Morris First Responders.\n\nLike last year, we are doing the FFA Chapter Challenge. This is a very easy way to win money, just by making connections with our local farmers. We have included in our Christmas letter this year a slip with directions to help us out with this. All you need to do is go online and vote for our chapter. Last year we placed in the top ten, and won $2,500. Also, Ace Sperr won the Chapter Challenge, and donated the money he received to us. Please help us out again this year! J\n\nPALS\n\nWe are still doing our pals program for the first graders, each flex period. This program is a curriculum that we have been adding to every year to give each year’s first graders the agriculture experience. To some, even introduce them to agriculture.\n\n\n\n\n\nThank you for your support of the Morris Area FFA Chapter!!\n\n\n\n\n\n2011-2012 Chapter Officers\nThis year’s chapter officers are as follows:\n President: Jake Moser\n\nVice President: Lloyd Lesmeister\n\nSecretary: Kaitlin Van Horn\n\nDirector: Brooke Wente\n\nReporter: Larissa Schmidgall\n\n\n Treasurer: Tom Holland\n\nParliamentarian: Steph Hennen\n\nSentinel: Brady Wulf\n\n \n\n","Morris Area FFA"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:carolynbaana.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:colormegreen.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":8,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"colormegreen.areavoices.com/488","permalink":"http://colormegreen.areavoices.com/2012/05/09/honor-thy-mother/","blogid":"18708","blogdomain":"colormegreen.areavoices.com","hostname":"colormegreen.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"What It's Really Like to be a Mom","content":"\n\nBefore I had kids I remember hearing the phrase, “You’ll never really understand what it’s like to be a mom until you are one.” I have to admit to thinking that geez, I have a pretty good imagination and I know my own mother and other moms pretty well – I think I get the idea.\n\nWhat I didn’t really understand though, was that being a parent isn’t just about getting all the day-to-day tasks done, keeping track of a whole household full of different schedules, doctor appointments, housekeeping, grocery shopping, and everything else (although, that sounds like three full-time jobs already!).\n\nWhat I discovered when I first became a mom a little over three years ago, is that being a parent is also about love. Well duh! Of course! Everyone knows that! I guess what I learned is more about the depth of love, more than just the existence of love. I’m talking about loving another person so much it actually makes you want to laugh and cry at the same time. I’m talking about loving another person so much that you really would do absolutely anything for that person.\n\nAnd as mothers and parents – we do! We wipe away tears, we teach about kindness, we slide down the plastic kiddie slide knowing another adult may see our butts get stuck half-way down – we may even use our own shirts to wipe a snotty nose (when absolutely no alternative presents) – we are wonder women!\n\nBeing a mom also means keeping our kids safe and healthy. Only 200 of the more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce have been tested for toxicity – so down the aisles and onto our computers we go, checking labels, researching products and companies, learning about chemicals we have no idea how pronounce, and working hard to protect our kids from toxins linked to asthma, autism, birth defects, and cancer.\n\nI really didn’t understand just how much stamina it takes to do what needs to be done on an everyday basis as a parent, but I wouldn’t trade any of it for the love that goes so deep it must come from my very soul. So here’s to you moms out there – working hard to keep your kids safe and healthy, and sometimes sacrificing your own clean shirt in the process!\n\nHappy Mother’s Day!\n\nTo simple, green living,\nCarrie Brusven\n\nChanging the world, one home and office at a time.\n\n \n\nCarrie Brusven is an Independent Green Irene Eco-Consultant based out of Moorhead, MN and her website can be found at www.greenirene.com/carriefargo. Carrie offers Green Home Makeovers, \"Go Green\" Workshops/Parties, and Green Business Makeovers with Green Business Bureau Certification. Contact Carrie to book a workshop or a makeover for your home or small business: csbrusven@gmail.com.\n\nLIKE my Facebook page for lots of free tips, inspiration, and advice about green living as well as information about upcoming classes and special offers on Green Irene products! www.facebook.com/colormegreennow.\n\n“You must be the change you hope to see in the world.” -Gandhi\n\n ","rawcontent":"\n\nBefore I had kids I remember hearing the phrase, Youll never really understand what its like to be a mom until you are one. I have to admit to thinking that geez, I have a pretty good imagination and I know my own mother and other moms pretty well I think I get the idea.\n\nWhat I didnt really understand though, was that being a parent isnt just about getting all the day-to-day tasks done, keeping track of a whole household full of different schedules, doctor appointments, housekeeping, grocery shopping, and everything else (although, that sounds like three full-time jobs already!).\n\nWhat I discovered when I first became a mom a little over three years ago, is that being a parent is also about love. Well duh! Of course! Everyone knows that! I guess what I learned is more about the depth of love, more than just the existence of love. Im talking about loving another person so much it actually makes you want to laugh and cry at the same time. Im talking about loving another person so much that you really would do absolutely anything for that person.\n\nAnd as mothers and parents we do! We wipe away tears, we teach about kindness, we slide down the plastic kiddie slide knowing another adult may see our butts get stuck half-way down we may even use our own shirts to wipe a snotty nose (when absolutely no alternative presents) we are wonder women!\n\nBeing a mom also means keeping our kids safe and healthy. Only 200 of the more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce have been tested for toxicity so down the aisles and onto our computers we go, checking labels, researching products and companies, learning about chemicals we have no idea how pronounce, and working hard to protect our kids from toxins linked to asthma, autism, birth defects, and cancer.\n\nI really didnt understand just how much stamina it takes to do what needs to be done on an everyday basis as a parent, but I wouldnt trade any of it for the love that goes so deep it must come from my very soul. So heres to you moms out there working hard to keep your kids safe and healthy, and sometimes sacrificing your own clean shirt in the process!\n\nHappy Mothers Day!\n\nTo simple, green living,\nCarrie Brusven\n\nChanging the world, one home and office at a time.\n\n \n\nCarrie Brusven is an Independent Green Irene Eco-Consultant based out of Moorhead, MN and her website can be found at www.greenirene.com/carriefargo. Carrie offers Green Home Makeovers, \"Go Green\" Workshops/Parties, and Green Business Makeovers with Green Business Bureau Certification. Contact Carrie to book a workshop or a makeover for your home or small business: csbrusven@gmail.com.\n\nLIKE my Facebook page for lots of free tips, inspiration, and advice about green living as well as information about upcoming classes and special offers on Green Irene products! www.facebook.com/colormegreennow.\n\nYou must be the change you hope to see in the world. -Gandhi\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\nBefore I had kids I remember hearing the phrase, Youll never really understand what its like to be a mom until you are one. I have to admit to thinking that geez, I have a pretty good imagination and I know my own mother and other moms pretty well I think I get the idea.\n\nWhat I didnt really understand though, was that being a parent isnt just about getting all the day-to-day tasks done, keeping track of a whole household full of different schedules, doctor appointments, housekeeping, grocery shopping, and everything else (although, that sounds like three full-time jobs already!).\n\nWhat I discovered when I first became a mom a little over three years ago, is that being a parent is also about love. Well duh! Of course! Everyone knows that! I guess what I learned is more about the depth of love, more than just the existence of love. Im talking about loving another person so much it actually makes you want to laugh and cry at the same time. Im talking about loving another person so much that you really would do absolutely anything for that person.\n\nAnd as mothers and parents we do! We wipe away tears, we teach about kindness, we slide down the plastic kiddie slide knowing another adult may see our butts get stuck half-way down we may even use our own shirts to wipe a snotty nose (when absolutely no alternative presents) we are wonder women!\n\nBeing a mom also means keeping our kids safe and healthy. Only 200 of the more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce have been tested for toxicity so down the aisles and onto our computers we go, checking labels, researching products and companies, learning about chemicals we have no idea how pronounce, and working hard to protect our kids from toxins linked to asthma, autism, birth defects, and cancer.\n\nI really didnt understand just how much stamina it takes to do what needs to be done on an everyday basis as a parent, but I wouldnt trade any of it for the love that goes so deep it must come from my very soul. So heres to you moms out there working hard to keep your kids safe and healthy, and sometimes sacrificing your own clean shirt in the process!\n\nHappy Mothers Day!\n\nTo simple, green living,\nCarrie Brusven\n\nChanging the world, one home and office at a time.\n\n \n\nCarrie Brusven is an Independent Green Irene Eco-Consultant based out of Moorhead, MN and her website can be found at www.greenirene.com/carriefargo. Carrie offers Green Home Makeovers, \"Go Green\" Workshops/Parties, and Green Business Makeovers with Green Business Bureau Certification. Contact Carrie to book a workshop or a makeover for your home or small business: csbrusven@gmail.com.\n\nLIKE my Facebook page for lots of free tips, inspiration, and advice about green living as well as information about upcoming classes and special offers on Green Irene products! www.facebook.com/colormegreennow.\n\nYou must be the change you hope to see in the world. -Gandhi\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Carrie S Brusven","author_s":"http://colormegreen.areavoices.com/author/carriebrusven/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-05-09T15:38:23Z","displaydate":"2012-05-09 10:38:23","displaymodified":"2012-05-11 11:47:34","tags":["cleaning supplies","environment","faith","family","green","health","home","life","living","moms","parenting","shesays","sustainable","toxic-free"],"categories":["Green Family","Toxic Free Living"],"spell":["What It's Really Like to be a Mom","\n\nBefore I had kids I remember hearing the phrase, “You’ll never really understand what it’s like to be a mom until you are one.” I have to admit to thinking that geez, I have a pretty good imagination and I know my own mother and other moms pretty well – I think I get the idea.\n\nWhat I didn’t really understand though, was that being a parent isn’t just about getting all the day-to-day tasks done, keeping track of a whole household full of different schedules, doctor appointments, housekeeping, grocery shopping, and everything else (although, that sounds like three full-time jobs already!).\n\nWhat I discovered when I first became a mom a little over three years ago, is that being a parent is also about love. Well duh! Of course! Everyone knows that! I guess what I learned is more about the depth of love, more than just the existence of love. I’m talking about loving another person so much it actually makes you want to laugh and cry at the same time. I’m talking about loving another person so much that you really would do absolutely anything for that person.\n\nAnd as mothers and parents – we do! We wipe away tears, we teach about kindness, we slide down the plastic kiddie slide knowing another adult may see our butts get stuck half-way down – we may even use our own shirts to wipe a snotty nose (when absolutely no alternative presents) – we are wonder women!\n\nBeing a mom also means keeping our kids safe and healthy. Only 200 of the more than 80,000 chemicals in commerce have been tested for toxicity – so down the aisles and onto our computers we go, checking labels, researching products and companies, learning about chemicals we have no idea how pronounce, and working hard to protect our kids from toxins linked to asthma, autism, birth defects, and cancer.\n\nI really didn’t understand just how much stamina it takes to do what needs to be done on an everyday basis as a parent, but I wouldn’t trade any of it for the love that goes so deep it must come from my very soul. So here’s to you moms out there – working hard to keep your kids safe and healthy, and sometimes sacrificing your own clean shirt in the process!\n\nHappy Mother’s Day!\n\nTo simple, green living,\nCarrie Brusven\n\nChanging the world, one home and office at a time.\n\n \n\nCarrie Brusven is an Independent Green Irene Eco-Consultant based out of Moorhead, MN and her website can be found at www.greenirene.com/carriefargo. Carrie offers Green Home Makeovers, \"Go Green\" Workshops/Parties, and Green Business Makeovers with Green Business Bureau Certification. Contact Carrie to book a workshop or a makeover for your home or small business: csbrusven@gmail.com.\n\nLIKE my Facebook page for lots of free tips, inspiration, and advice about green living as well as information about upcoming classes and special offers on Green Irene products! www.facebook.com/colormegreennow.\n\n“You must be the change you hope to see in the world.” -Gandhi\n\n ","Carrie S Brusven"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:middleagedplague.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":55,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"middleagedplague.areavoices.com/1764","permalink":"http://middleagedplague.areavoices.com/2013/06/13/im-not-lost-im-differently-positioned/","blogid":"13768","blogdomain":"middleagedplague.areavoices.com","hostname":"middleagedplague.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"I'm Not Lost, I'm Differently Positioned","content":"If you haven't heard from me for awhile and you wonder where I've been, this is a good time to re-mention that I have changed my name from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes.\n\nYou can find, and follow, me at www.ThisWomanWrites.AreaVoices.com, and if you're used to reading me on a particular newspaper blogging platform, please write that newspaper and let them know that you'd like to find me in my new format -- This Woman Writes -- there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1769\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] Come, walk with me. Catching the Breeze, original and signed limited edition print at Steve Henderson Fine Art; licensed open edition fine art print at Great Big Canvas[/caption]\n\nWhat have I been writing about lately?\n\nYou Can Be Successful without Owning Goats\n\nChristians: Please Stop Talking Like Weird People\n\n\"Overwhelmed\" Is Not the New Normal\n\nLabeling People and Not Labeling Food\n\nWhat Unconditional Love Looks Like\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1768\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Steve keeps painting, so there are a lot of new works to view. Homeland 2, part of the Homeland series, which is sold. Licensed open edition art prints available at Great Big Canvas.[/caption]\n\nand much more. I still feature artwork by my Norwegian Artist husband, Steve Henderson, and since I've changed from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes, Steve has had his work licensed in various areas.\n\nYou can find Steve Henderson's works in these places:\n\n\tSteve Henderson Fine Art (original paintings, signed limited edition prints, posters)\n\tGreat Big Canvas (licensed open edition art prints)\n\tLight in the Box (licensed open edition art prints)\n\tSagebrush Fine Art (licensed open edition art posters)\n\tAmazon.com, AllPosters.com, Art.com (licensed open edition art posters)\n\nManufacturers and retailers — license Steve’s work through Art Licensing\n\nSo please, find me at This Woman Writes, and let's pick up where we left off.\n\n-- Carolyn\n\n ","rawcontent":"If you haven't heard from me for awhile and you wonder where I've been, this is a good time to re-mention that I have changed my name from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes.\n\nYou can find, and follow, me atwww.ThisWomanWrites.AreaVoices.com, and if you're used to reading me on a particular newspaper blogging platform, please write that newspaper and let them know that you'd like to find me in my new format -- This Woman Writes -- there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1769\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] Come, walk with me. Catching the Breeze, original and signed limited edition print at Steve Henderson Fine Art; licensed open edition fine art print at Great Big Canvas[/caption]\n\nWhat have I been writing about lately?\n\nYou Can Be Successful without Owning Goats\n\nChristians: Please Stop Talking Like Weird People\n\n\"Overwhelmed\" Is Not the New Normal\n\nLabeling People and Not Labeling Food\n\nWhat Unconditional Love Looks Like\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1768\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Steve keeps painting, so there are a lot of new works to view. Homeland 2, part of the Homeland series, which is sold. Licensed open edition art prints available at Great Big Canvas.[/caption]\n\nand much more. I still feature artwork by my Norwegian Artist husband, Steve Henderson, and since I've changed from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes, Steve has had his work licensed in various areas.\n\nYou can find Steve Henderson's works in these places:\n\nSteve Henderson Fine Art(original paintings,signed limited edition prints,posters)\nGreat Big Canvas(licensed open edition art prints)\nLight in the Box(licensed open edition art prints)\nSagebrush Fine Art(licensed open edition art posters)\nAmazon.com,AllPosters.com,Art.com(licensed open edition art posters)\n\nManufacturers and retailers license Steves work throughArt Licensing\n\nSo please, find me at This Woman Writes, and let's pick up where we left off.\n\n-- Carolyn\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"If you haven't heard from me for awhile and you wonder where I've been, this is a good time to re-mention that I have changed my name from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes.\n\nYou can find, and follow, me atwww.ThisWomanWrites.AreaVoices.com, and if you're used to reading me on a particular newspaper blogging platform, please write that newspaper and let them know that you'd like to find me in my new format -- This Woman Writes -- there.\n\n\n\nWhat have I been writing about lately?\n\nYou Can Be Successful without Owning Goats\n\nChristians: Please Stop Talking Like Weird People\n\n\"Overwhelmed\" Is Not the New Normal\n\nLabeling People and Not Labeling Food\n\nWhat Unconditional Love Looks Like\n\n\n\nand much more. I still feature artwork by my Norwegian Artist husband, Steve Henderson, and since I've changed from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes, Steve has had his work licensed in various areas.\n\nYou can find Steve Henderson's works in these places:\n\nSteve Henderson Fine Art(original paintings,signed limited edition prints,posters)\nGreat Big Canvas(licensed open edition art prints)\nLight in the Box(licensed open edition art prints)\nSagebrush Fine Art(licensed open edition art posters)\nAmazon.com,AllPosters.com,Art.com(licensed open edition art posters)\n\nManufacturers and retailers license Steves work throughArt Licensing\n\nSo please, find me at This Woman Writes, and let's pick up where we left off.\n\n-- Carolyn\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"This Woman Writes","author_s":"http://middleagedplague.areavoices.com/author/middleagedplague/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-06-13T01:04:16Z","displaydate":"2013-06-13 01:04:16","displaymodified":"2013-06-13 01:04:16","tags":["blogging","Carolyn Henderson","culture","current events","daily life","encouragement","family","home","humor","life","lifestyle","middle age","middle aged plague","motherhood","news","painting","personal","random","relationships","Steve Henderson"],"categories":["Art","Blogging","Culture","Current Events","Daily Life","family","humor","Life","Lifestyle","Middle Aged Plague"],"spell":["I'm Not Lost, I'm Differently Positioned","If you haven't heard from me for awhile and you wonder where I've been, this is a good time to re-mention that I have changed my name from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes.\n\nYou can find, and follow, me at www.ThisWomanWrites.AreaVoices.com, and if you're used to reading me on a particular newspaper blogging platform, please write that newspaper and let them know that you'd like to find me in my new format -- This Woman Writes -- there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1769\" align=\"alignleft\" width=\"300\"] Come, walk with me. Catching the Breeze, original and signed limited edition print at Steve Henderson Fine Art; licensed open edition fine art print at Great Big Canvas[/caption]\n\nWhat have I been writing about lately?\n\nYou Can Be Successful without Owning Goats\n\nChristians: Please Stop Talking Like Weird People\n\n\"Overwhelmed\" Is Not the New Normal\n\nLabeling People and Not Labeling Food\n\nWhat Unconditional Love Looks Like\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1768\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"300\"] Steve keeps painting, so there are a lot of new works to view. Homeland 2, part of the Homeland series, which is sold. Licensed open edition art prints available at Great Big Canvas.[/caption]\n\nand much more. I still feature artwork by my Norwegian Artist husband, Steve Henderson, and since I've changed from Middle Aged Plague to This Woman Writes, Steve has had his work licensed in various areas.\n\nYou can find Steve Henderson's works in these places:\n\n\tSteve Henderson Fine Art (original paintings, signed limited edition prints, posters)\n\tGreat Big Canvas (licensed open edition art prints)\n\tLight in the Box (licensed open edition art prints)\n\tSagebrush Fine Art (licensed open edition art posters)\n\tAmazon.com, AllPosters.com, Art.com (licensed open edition art posters)\n\nManufacturers and retailers — license Steve’s work through Art Licensing\n\nSo please, find me at This Woman Writes, and let's pick up where we left off.\n\n-- Carolyn\n\n ","This Woman Writes"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:escapetomex.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:shootin.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":182,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"shootin.areavoices.com/85191","permalink":"http://shootin.areavoices.com/2014/07/14/off-the-grid-attempt-2/","blogid":"1001","blogdomain":"shootin.areavoices.com","hostname":"shootin.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Off the Grid Attempt #2","content":"I’m going to the Boundary Waters.\n\nYes, me. The girl who sat in the woods and cried with her friend during church wilderness camp because it “wasn’t fun,” “felt like abuse” and all we wanted was to get home. Susie and I sat on a trail together, scratching our mosquito bites and soaking up our tears with toilet paper. We agreed that camping “felt like the military”… because as eighth graders, we understood what that was like. We simply hadn’t known what we were in for.\n\nBut it’s been a few years. I’ve learned a couple of things. I’ve grown stronger, and my entire life has changed since our little meltdown in the deep woods.\n\nAnd so, I’m going off the grid again, but this time it’s not out of boredom, stupidity or parental pressure.  It’s not because I have to, or because I’m dating some insane outdoorsman. Rather, this was something I elected to do because I feel like I need it.\n\nNeed it?\n\nYes, pretty desperately. Trust me, I’d prefer a trip out to Maine where I could eat fresh seafood every day and stay in decent, comfortable hotels. You know… ones with flushing toilets, WIFI and pillows and blankets that you don’t have to carry for miles.\n\nBut I got to thinking, I spend upwards of eight hours per day in front of a computer – probably closer to 10 with work, photo editing, ‘Wit writing, feeding my Facebook addiction, checking email, and staring at the hourly forecast to see how it will dictate the hours I’m not on my electronic devices. I try to limit it (there’s a reason I don’t have a Smartphone), but the times I’m not on my computer, my iPad and phone are nearby, so I can follow up on messages from friends, who are usually upset that I didn’t answer and/or took too long to respond.\n\nThis disconnect with nature spreads to other areas of my life, too. Before I run, I shove ear buds in my ears. Every night, I fall asleep to the soothing sound of traffic. During my morning drive to work, I waste an annoying amount of time sitting at the two stoplights I am forced to go through – just enough to get on my nerves.\n\nI’ve also begun to take for granted living 100 yards away from a grocery store, flipping a switch to light up a room, having ice in my water. I’ve also grown increasingly fond of my bed, running water and fresh laundry and towels. And I've fallen in love with the privacy four walls and a sturdy, locked door provide.\n\nBut I’ve taken these things so far for granted and gotten so used to everything being automatic, that it has begun to put a bit of a damper on my life. My iPad has replaced stepping out to examine the night sky. I swim in a pool instead of a lake, and run on a treadmill instead of exploring new outdoor trails. I commonly eat dinner in front of my computer. I’ve become a bit captive of my amenities. I’ve been living it up within my little comfort zone and, quite honestly, I’m annoyed with myself.\n\nIt has gotten out of hand. It’s way too much. I need to disconnect and get away.\n\nSo, despite my previous bad experience, I’m packing one very small bag, leaving my electronics, eyeliner and comforting “stuff” at home, and roughing it.\n\nI try to do things that scare me every chance I get, but this trip makes me nervous to say the least.\n\nFor starters, it will put my comfort zone out of sight for five days, with no option to turn around and back out.\n\nI’ll also need to completely trust my brother-in-law’s compass and map-reading skills to get us out and back safely and on time. Though, I admit, any guy who made his way into my sister’s heart probably has infallible navigation.\n\nThere’s the usual fear of creatures with more than four legs, running out of toilet paper, getting swallowed by a bear, falling into a poison ivy bush, getting rained on for five consecutive days and getting separated from the group and having to fend for myself. But all in all, I recognize the incredible amount of opportunity in this vacation.\n\nFor the first time in 10 years, I’ll cast a line in hopes to catch my dinner. Then, if I can find it in me to cut up Nemo and eat him, I’ll happily cross Bucket List Item #16 off my list (learn to fillet a fish). The best part about it? I’ll be learning first hand from my Dad. I even have a chance at crossing off Bucket List Item #17—sleep in a tree fort or igloo — if I can convince my brother-in-law to build me one (a tree fort, in this case, not the igloo).\n\nI’m excited to fall asleep and wake up to the sound of a crackling campfire. To spend entire days under the sun watching birds and catching fish, then watching the moon wane a little more each night. I’m looking forward to pan frying fresh fish over a fire, curling up in a sleeping bag, swimming in a lake, having good ole fashioned conversation 100% free of the distraction of phones, and who knows – maybe facing my fear of spiders at last.\n\nThough the last one is highly doubtful, maybe I should be concerned with how I’ll get back into the grind and \"up to speed\" when I get back home.\n\nShootin’ the Wit is a sporadic blog about everyday life that should never, ever be taken too seriously.","rawcontent":"Im going to the Boundary Waters.\n\nYes, me. The girl who sat in the woods and cried with her friend during church wilderness camp because it wasnt fun, felt like abuse and all we wanted was to get home. Susie and I sat on a trail together, scratching our mosquito bites and soaking up our tears with toilet paper. We agreed that camping felt like the military because as eighth graders, we understood what that was like. We simply hadnt known what we were in for.\n\nBut its been a few years. Ive learned a couple of things. Ive grown stronger, and my entire life has changed since our little meltdown in the deep woods.\n\nAnd so, Im going off the grid again, but this time its not out of boredom, stupidity or parental pressure. Its not because I have to, or because Im dating some insane outdoorsman. Rather, this was something I elected to do because I feel like I need it.\n\nNeed it?\n\nYes, pretty desperately. Trust me, Id prefer a trip out to Maine where I could eat fresh seafood every day and stay in decent, comfortable hotels. You know ones with flushing toilets, WIFI and pillows and blankets that you dont have to carry for miles.\n\nBut I got to thinking, I spend upwards of eight hours per day in front of a computer probably closer to 10 with work, photo editing, Wit writing, feeding my Facebook addiction, checking email, and staring at the hourly forecast to see how it will dictate the hours Im not on my electronic devices. I try to limit it (theres a reason I dont have a Smartphone), but the times Im not on my computer, my iPad and phone are nearby, so I can follow up on messages from friends, who are usually upset that I didnt answer and/or took too long to respond.\n\nThis disconnect with nature spreads to other areas of my life, too. Before I run, I shove ear buds in my ears. Every night, I fall asleep to the soothing sound of traffic. During my morning drive to work, I waste an annoying amount of time sitting at the two stoplights I am forced to go through just enough to get on my nerves.\n\nIve also begun to take for granted living 100 yards away from a grocery store, flipping a switch to light up a room, having ice in my water. Ive also grown increasingly fond of my bed, running water and fresh laundry and towels. And I've fallen in love with the privacy four walls and a sturdy, locked door provide.\n\nBut Ive taken these things so far for granted and gotten so used to everything being automatic, that it has begun to put a bit of a damper on my life. My iPad has replaced stepping out to examine the night sky. I swim in a pool instead of a lake, and run on a treadmill instead of exploring new outdoor trails. I commonly eat dinner in front of my computer. Ive become a bit captive of my amenities. Ive been living it up within my little comfort zone and, quite honestly, Im annoyed with myself.\n\nIt has gotten out of hand. Its way too much. I need to disconnect and get away.\n\nSo, despite my previous bad experience, Im packing one very small bag, leaving my electronics, eyeliner and comforting stuff at home, and roughing it.\n\nI try to do things that scare me every chance I get, but this trip makes me nervous to say the least.\n\nFor starters, it will put my comfort zone out of sight for five days, with no option to turn around and back out.\n\nIll also need to completely trust my brother-in-laws compass and map-reading skills to get us out and back safely and on time. Though, I admit, any guy who made his way into my sisters heart probably has infallible navigation.\n\nTheres the usual fear of creatures with more than four legs, running out of toilet paper, getting swallowed by a bear, falling into a poison ivy bush, getting rained on for five consecutive days and getting separated from the group and having to fend for myself. But all in all, I recognize the incredible amount of opportunity in this vacation.\n\nFor the first time in 10 years, Ill cast a line in hopes to catch my dinner. Then, if I can find it in me to cut up Nemo and eat him, Ill happily cross Bucket List Item #16 off my list (learn to fillet a fish). The best part about it? Ill be learning first hand from my Dad. I even have a chance at crossing off Bucket List Item #17sleep in a tree fort or igloo if I can convince my brother-in-law to build me one (a tree fort, in this case, not the igloo).\n\nIm excited to fall asleep and wake up to the sound of a crackling campfire. To spend entire days under the sun watching birds and catching fish, then watching the moon wane a little more each night. Im looking forward to pan frying fresh fish over a fire, curling up in a sleeping bag, swimming in a lake, having good ole fashioned conversation 100% free of the distraction of phones, and who knows maybe facing my fear of spiders at last.\n\nThough the last one is highly doubtful, maybe I should be concerned with how Ill get back into the grind and \"up to speed\" when I get back home.\n\nShootin the Wit is a sporadic blog about everyday life that should never, ever be taken too seriously.","contentnoshortcodes":"Im going to the Boundary Waters.\n\nYes, me. The girl who sat in the woods and cried with her friend during church wilderness camp because it wasnt fun, felt like abuse and all we wanted was to get home. Susie and I sat on a trail together, scratching our mosquito bites and soaking up our tears with toilet paper. We agreed that camping felt like the military because as eighth graders, we understood what that was like. We simply hadnt known what we were in for.\n\nBut its been a few years. Ive learned a couple of things. Ive grown stronger, and my entire life has changed since our little meltdown in the deep woods.\n\nAnd so, Im going off the grid again, but this time its not out of boredom, stupidity or parental pressure. Its not because I have to, or because Im dating some insane outdoorsman. Rather, this was something I elected to do because I feel like I need it.\n\nNeed it?\n\nYes, pretty desperately. Trust me, Id prefer a trip out to Maine where I could eat fresh seafood every day and stay in decent, comfortable hotels. You know ones with flushing toilets, WIFI and pillows and blankets that you dont have to carry for miles.\n\nBut I got to thinking, I spend upwards of eight hours per day in front of a computer probably closer to 10 with work, photo editing, Wit writing, feeding my Facebook addiction, checking email, and staring at the hourly forecast to see how it will dictate the hours Im not on my electronic devices. I try to limit it (theres a reason I dont have a Smartphone), but the times Im not on my computer, my iPad and phone are nearby, so I can follow up on messages from friends, who are usually upset that I didnt answer and/or took too long to respond.\n\nThis disconnect with nature spreads to other areas of my life, too. Before I run, I shove ear buds in my ears. Every night, I fall asleep to the soothing sound of traffic. During my morning drive to work, I waste an annoying amount of time sitting at the two stoplights I am forced to go through just enough to get on my nerves.\n\nIve also begun to take for granted living 100 yards away from a grocery store, flipping a switch to light up a room, having ice in my water. Ive also grown increasingly fond of my bed, running water and fresh laundry and towels. And I've fallen in love with the privacy four walls and a sturdy, locked door provide.\n\nBut Ive taken these things so far for granted and gotten so used to everything being automatic, that it has begun to put a bit of a damper on my life. My iPad has replaced stepping out to examine the night sky. I swim in a pool instead of a lake, and run on a treadmill instead of exploring new outdoor trails. I commonly eat dinner in front of my computer. Ive become a bit captive of my amenities. Ive been living it up within my little comfort zone and, quite honestly, Im annoyed with myself.\n\nIt has gotten out of hand. Its way too much. I need to disconnect and get away.\n\nSo, despite my previous bad experience, Im packing one very small bag, leaving my electronics, eyeliner and comforting stuff at home, and roughing it.\n\nI try to do things that scare me every chance I get, but this trip makes me nervous to say the least.\n\nFor starters, it will put my comfort zone out of sight for five days, with no option to turn around and back out.\n\nIll also need to completely trust my brother-in-laws compass and map-reading skills to get us out and back safely and on time. Though, I admit, any guy who made his way into my sisters heart probably has infallible navigation.\n\nTheres the usual fear of creatures with more than four legs, running out of toilet paper, getting swallowed by a bear, falling into a poison ivy bush, getting rained on for five consecutive days and getting separated from the group and having to fend for myself. But all in all, I recognize the incredible amount of opportunity in this vacation.\n\nFor the first time in 10 years, Ill cast a line in hopes to catch my dinner. Then, if I can find it in me to cut up Nemo and eat him, Ill happily cross Bucket List Item #16 off my list (learn to fillet a fish). The best part about it? Ill be learning first hand from my Dad. I even have a chance at crossing off Bucket List Item #17sleep in a tree fort or igloo if I can convince my brother-in-law to build me one (a tree fort, in this case, not the igloo).\n\nIm excited to fall asleep and wake up to the sound of a crackling campfire. To spend entire days under the sun watching birds and catching fish, then watching the moon wane a little more each night. Im looking forward to pan frying fresh fish over a fire, curling up in a sleeping bag, swimming in a lake, having good ole fashioned conversation 100% free of the distraction of phones, and who knows maybe facing my fear of spiders at last.\n\nThough the last one is highly doubtful, maybe I should be concerned with how Ill get back into the grind and \"up to speed\" when I get back home.\n\nShootin the Wit is a sporadic blog about everyday life that should never, ever be taken too seriously.","numcomments":0,"author":"Laura Stoneburner","author_s":"http://shootin.areavoices.com/author/shootin/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-14T12:04:54Z","displaydate":"2014-07-14 12:04:54","displaymodified":"2014-07-14 19:02:44","spell":["Off the Grid Attempt #2","I’m going to the Boundary Waters.\n\nYes, me. The girl who sat in the woods and cried with her friend during church wilderness camp because it “wasn’t fun,” “felt like abuse” and all we wanted was to get home. Susie and I sat on a trail together, scratching our mosquito bites and soaking up our tears with toilet paper. We agreed that camping “felt like the military”… because as eighth graders, we understood what that was like. We simply hadn’t known what we were in for.\n\nBut it’s been a few years. I’ve learned a couple of things. I’ve grown stronger, and my entire life has changed since our little meltdown in the deep woods.\n\nAnd so, I’m going off the grid again, but this time it’s not out of boredom, stupidity or parental pressure.  It’s not because I have to, or because I’m dating some insane outdoorsman. Rather, this was something I elected to do because I feel like I need it.\n\nNeed it?\n\nYes, pretty desperately. Trust me, I’d prefer a trip out to Maine where I could eat fresh seafood every day and stay in decent, comfortable hotels. You know… ones with flushing toilets, WIFI and pillows and blankets that you don’t have to carry for miles.\n\nBut I got to thinking, I spend upwards of eight hours per day in front of a computer – probably closer to 10 with work, photo editing, ‘Wit writing, feeding my Facebook addiction, checking email, and staring at the hourly forecast to see how it will dictate the hours I’m not on my electronic devices. I try to limit it (there’s a reason I don’t have a Smartphone), but the times I’m not on my computer, my iPad and phone are nearby, so I can follow up on messages from friends, who are usually upset that I didn’t answer and/or took too long to respond.\n\nThis disconnect with nature spreads to other areas of my life, too. Before I run, I shove ear buds in my ears. Every night, I fall asleep to the soothing sound of traffic. During my morning drive to work, I waste an annoying amount of time sitting at the two stoplights I am forced to go through – just enough to get on my nerves.\n\nI’ve also begun to take for granted living 100 yards away from a grocery store, flipping a switch to light up a room, having ice in my water. I’ve also grown increasingly fond of my bed, running water and fresh laundry and towels. And I've fallen in love with the privacy four walls and a sturdy, locked door provide.\n\nBut I’ve taken these things so far for granted and gotten so used to everything being automatic, that it has begun to put a bit of a damper on my life. My iPad has replaced stepping out to examine the night sky. I swim in a pool instead of a lake, and run on a treadmill instead of exploring new outdoor trails. I commonly eat dinner in front of my computer. I’ve become a bit captive of my amenities. I’ve been living it up within my little comfort zone and, quite honestly, I’m annoyed with myself.\n\nIt has gotten out of hand. It’s way too much. I need to disconnect and get away.\n\nSo, despite my previous bad experience, I’m packing one very small bag, leaving my electronics, eyeliner and comforting “stuff” at home, and roughing it.\n\nI try to do things that scare me every chance I get, but this trip makes me nervous to say the least.\n\nFor starters, it will put my comfort zone out of sight for five days, with no option to turn around and back out.\n\nI’ll also need to completely trust my brother-in-law’s compass and map-reading skills to get us out and back safely and on time. Though, I admit, any guy who made his way into my sister’s heart probably has infallible navigation.\n\nThere’s the usual fear of creatures with more than four legs, running out of toilet paper, getting swallowed by a bear, falling into a poison ivy bush, getting rained on for five consecutive days and getting separated from the group and having to fend for myself. But all in all, I recognize the incredible amount of opportunity in this vacation.\n\nFor the first time in 10 years, I’ll cast a line in hopes to catch my dinner. Then, if I can find it in me to cut up Nemo and eat him, I’ll happily cross Bucket List Item #16 off my list (learn to fillet a fish). The best part about it? I’ll be learning first hand from my Dad. I even have a chance at crossing off Bucket List Item #17—sleep in a tree fort or igloo — if I can convince my brother-in-law to build me one (a tree fort, in this case, not the igloo).\n\nI’m excited to fall asleep and wake up to the sound of a crackling campfire. To spend entire days under the sun watching birds and catching fish, then watching the moon wane a little more each night. I’m looking forward to pan frying fresh fish over a fire, curling up in a sleeping bag, swimming in a lake, having good ole fashioned conversation 100% free of the distraction of phones, and who knows – maybe facing my fear of spiders at last.\n\nThough the last one is highly doubtful, maybe I should be concerned with how I’ll get back into the grind and \"up to speed\" when I get back home.\n\nShootin’ the Wit is a sporadic blog about everyday life that should never, ever be taken too seriously.","Laura Stoneburner"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:topmom.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":243,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"topmom.areavoices.com/83075","permalink":"http://topmom.areavoices.com/2014/04/29/financial-wellness-priorities-keep-eyes-on-prize/","blogid":"1116","blogdomain":"topmom.areavoices.com","hostname":"topmom.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Financial Wellness: Priorities keep eyes on prize","content":"The secure login screen for one of our investment accounts includes a photo of a tranquil lake scene.\n\nFor us, it’s also motivational.\n\nIn previous columns, I’ve written how certain things aren’t priorities for my family’s budget, such as dining frequently at fine establishments or salon visits to color my newly gray strands.\n\nSo what is a priority for our family’s finances? Our future, including owning a lake cabin one day.\n\nTo get there, my husband and I each put money into our individual retirement accounts monthly, and also make an automatic additional principal payment on our mortgage.\n\nEvery other week, we set money aside in a car fund with the goal of paying cash for our next new-to-us vehicle, and we stash some in an online money market account meant to fund our next vacation.\n\nWe put a bit of money into each of the kid’s college funds every month, too. While helping pay for their college educations is a priority, it’s lower on the list.\n\nPriorities are key for good money management. They keep you on track, especially if you’ve got money burning a hole in your pocket. They help us allocate the “extra” money, whether it’s the monthly difference between our paychecks and payments, or an occasional gift or bonus.\n\nPersonal finance author Dave Ramsey’s seven baby steps offer a good framework for financial priorities. They’re meant to be done in order, with each one being accomplished before tackling the next:\n\n1) Save up $1,000 in case of an emergency.\n2) Pay off all debt except the mortgage.\n3) Save a 3- to 6-month emergency fund.\n4) Contribute 15 percent to retirement accounts.\n5) Contribute to college savings funds.\n6) Pay off your mortgage.\n7) Build wealth and give.\n\nWhile simple and sound to follow, the baby steps aren’t a one-size-fits all solution, in my opinion. We contributed to retirement and college funds before having all of my husband’s (low-interest and tax-deductible) student loan paid off. Once it was, we allocated the money we had been putting toward that loan to another financial goal.\n\nNo family’s priorities are going to be the same. What might seem wasteful to me may be your raison d’être. But there are some general guidelines that are good to follow when you think about how you can – and should – be spending and saving.\n\nFirst, realize you must earn enough to cover everything you need. Sometimes that requires earning more. Other times, it means redefining what you “need.”\n\nSecond, recognize you’ll probably never have enough money to do everything you want. Decide what truly matters, what you really want to accomplish, and what finances it will take to get there.\n\nThird, remember that saving for the future, near and distant, isn’t optional. It’s not “nice to do.” It’s necessary. Pay yourself first.\n\nWith those basic truths in mind, you can start to think about where you want your dollars to go.\n\nSherri Richards is a thrifty mom of two and Business editor of The Forum. She can be reached at srichards@forumcomm.com\n\n ","rawcontent":"The secure login screen for one of our investment accounts includes a photo of a tranquil lake scene.\n\nFor us, its also motivational.\n\nIn previous columns, Ive written how certain things arent priorities for my familys budget, such as dining frequently at fine establishments or salon visits to color my newly gray strands.\n\nSo what is a priority for our familys finances? Our future, including owning a lake cabin one day.\n\nTo get there, my husband and I each put money into our individual retirement accounts monthly, and also make an automatic additional principal payment on our mortgage.\n\nEvery other week, we set money aside in a car fund with the goal of paying cash for our next new-to-us vehicle, and we stash some in an online money market account meant to fund our next vacation.\n\nWe put a bit of money into each of the kids college funds every month, too. While helping pay for their college educations is a priority, its lower on the list.\n\nPriorities are key for good money management. They keep you on track, especially if youve got money burning a hole in your pocket. They help us allocate the extra money, whether its the monthly difference between our paychecks and payments, or an occasional gift or bonus.\n\nPersonal finance author Dave Ramseys seven baby steps offer a good framework for financial priorities. Theyre meant to be done in order, with each one being accomplished before tackling the next:\n\n1) Save up $1,000 in case of an emergency.\n2) Pay off all debt except the mortgage.\n3) Save a 3- to 6-month emergency fund.\n4) Contribute 15 percent to retirement accounts.\n5) Contribute to college savings funds.\n6) Pay off your mortgage.\n7) Build wealth and give.\n\nWhile simple and sound to follow, the baby steps arent a one-size-fits all solution, in my opinion. We contributed to retirement and college funds before having all of my husbands (low-interest and tax-deductible) student loan paid off. Once it was, we allocated the money we had been putting toward that loan to another financial goal.\n\nNo familys priorities are going to be the same. What might seem wasteful to me may be your raison dtre. But there are some general guidelines that are good to follow when you think about how you can and should be spending and saving.\n\nFirst, realize you must earn enough to cover everything you need. Sometimes that requires earning more. Other times, it means redefining what you need.\n\nSecond, recognize youll probably never have enough money to do everything you want. Decide what truly matters, what you really want to accomplish, and what finances it will take to get there.\n\nThird, remember that saving for the future, near and distant, isnt optional. Its not nice to do. Its necessary. Pay yourself first.\n\nWith those basic truths in mind, you can start to think about where you want your dollars to go.\n\nSherri Richards is a thrifty mom of two and Business editor of The Forum. She can be reached at srichards@forumcomm.com\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"The secure login screen for one of our investment accounts includes a photo of a tranquil lake scene.\n\nFor us, its also motivational.\n\nIn previous columns, Ive written how certain things arent priorities for my familys budget, such as dining frequently at fine establishments or salon visits to color my newly gray strands.\n\nSo what is a priority for our familys finances? Our future, including owning a lake cabin one day.\n\nTo get there, my husband and I each put money into our individual retirement accounts monthly, and also make an automatic additional principal payment on our mortgage.\n\nEvery other week, we set money aside in a car fund with the goal of paying cash for our next new-to-us vehicle, and we stash some in an online money market account meant to fund our next vacation.\n\nWe put a bit of money into each of the kids college funds every month, too. While helping pay for their college educations is a priority, its lower on the list.\n\nPriorities are key for good money management. They keep you on track, especially if youve got money burning a hole in your pocket. They help us allocate the extra money, whether its the monthly difference between our paychecks and payments, or an occasional gift or bonus.\n\nPersonal finance author Dave Ramseys seven baby steps offer a good framework for financial priorities. Theyre meant to be done in order, with each one being accomplished before tackling the next:\n\n1) Save up $1,000 in case of an emergency.\n2) Pay off all debt except the mortgage.\n3) Save a 3- to 6-month emergency fund.\n4) Contribute 15 percent to retirement accounts.\n5) Contribute to college savings funds.\n6) Pay off your mortgage.\n7) Build wealth and give.\n\nWhile simple and sound to follow, the baby steps arent a one-size-fits all solution, in my opinion. We contributed to retirement and college funds before having all of my husbands (low-interest and tax-deductible) student loan paid off. Once it was, we allocated the money we had been putting toward that loan to another financial goal.\n\nNo familys priorities are going to be the same. What might seem wasteful to me may be your raison dtre. But there are some general guidelines that are good to follow when you think about how you can and should be spending and saving.\n\nFirst, realize you must earn enough to cover everything you need. Sometimes that requires earning more. Other times, it means redefining what you need.\n\nSecond, recognize youll probably never have enough money to do everything you want. Decide what truly matters, what you really want to accomplish, and what finances it will take to get there.\n\nThird, remember that saving for the future, near and distant, isnt optional. Its not nice to do. Its necessary. Pay yourself first.\n\nWith those basic truths in mind, you can start to think about where you want your dollars to go.\n\nSherri Richards is a thrifty mom of two and Business editor of The Forum. She can be reached at srichards@forumcomm.com\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Sherri Richards","author_s":"http://topmom.areavoices.com/author/topmom/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-04-29T05:22:45Z","displaydate":"2014-04-29 00:22:45","displaymodified":"2014-05-05 00:26:25","spell":["Financial Wellness: Priorities keep eyes on prize","The secure login screen for one of our investment accounts includes a photo of a tranquil lake scene.\n\nFor us, it’s also motivational.\n\nIn previous columns, I’ve written how certain things aren’t priorities for my family’s budget, such as dining frequently at fine establishments or salon visits to color my newly gray strands.\n\nSo what is a priority for our family’s finances? Our future, including owning a lake cabin one day.\n\nTo get there, my husband and I each put money into our individual retirement accounts monthly, and also make an automatic additional principal payment on our mortgage.\n\nEvery other week, we set money aside in a car fund with the goal of paying cash for our next new-to-us vehicle, and we stash some in an online money market account meant to fund our next vacation.\n\nWe put a bit of money into each of the kid’s college funds every month, too. While helping pay for their college educations is a priority, it’s lower on the list.\n\nPriorities are key for good money management. They keep you on track, especially if you’ve got money burning a hole in your pocket. They help us allocate the “extra” money, whether it’s the monthly difference between our paychecks and payments, or an occasional gift or bonus.\n\nPersonal finance author Dave Ramsey’s seven baby steps offer a good framework for financial priorities. They’re meant to be done in order, with each one being accomplished before tackling the next:\n\n1) Save up $1,000 in case of an emergency.\n2) Pay off all debt except the mortgage.\n3) Save a 3- to 6-month emergency fund.\n4) Contribute 15 percent to retirement accounts.\n5) Contribute to college savings funds.\n6) Pay off your mortgage.\n7) Build wealth and give.\n\nWhile simple and sound to follow, the baby steps aren’t a one-size-fits all solution, in my opinion. We contributed to retirement and college funds before having all of my husband’s (low-interest and tax-deductible) student loan paid off. Once it was, we allocated the money we had been putting toward that loan to another financial goal.\n\nNo family’s priorities are going to be the same. What might seem wasteful to me may be your raison d’être. But there are some general guidelines that are good to follow when you think about how you can – and should – be spending and saving.\n\nFirst, realize you must earn enough to cover everything you need. Sometimes that requires earning more. Other times, it means redefining what you “need.”\n\nSecond, recognize you’ll probably never have enough money to do everything you want. Decide what truly matters, what you really want to accomplish, and what finances it will take to get there.\n\nThird, remember that saving for the future, near and distant, isn’t optional. It’s not “nice to do.” It’s necessary. Pay yourself first.\n\nWith those basic truths in mind, you can start to think about where you want your dollars to go.\n\nSherri Richards is a thrifty mom of two and Business editor of The Forum. She can be reached at srichards@forumcomm.com\n\n ","Sherri Richards"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:peacegardenmama.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":1032,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"peacegardenmama.areavoices.com/86844","permalink":"http://peacegardenmama.areavoices.com/2014/07/21/meaningful-mondays-farewell-to-an-irish-blessing/","blogid":"840","blogdomain":"peacegardenmama.areavoices.com","hostname":"peacegardenmama.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"meaningful mondays: farewell to an irish blessing","content":"I didn't know Fr. Peter Hughes well -- not as well as some in my life.  I would see him at gatherings here and there during the years he served here, and I knew more than a few people who held him beloved. Then one day in 2011, I was given the honor of writing a story on him on the occasion of his golden jubilee as a priest. The day we sat down together, I discovered why he was such a magnet to so many.\n\n\n\nWith space constraints before me, my editor and I decided to let him do the talking. Our time at the now-defunct Cardinal Meunch Seminary in north Fargo is etched in my memory, in a precious place. Some of his thoughts became infused into the article that resulted, and the rest is simply in my heart, but I have called to mind his broad and loving perspective about God's hand in the world and in our lives many times over.\n\nFather Hughes' life ended where it began, in his homeland of Ireland; a place I also count as part of my ancestral grounding. The middle of his life, however, included long stops in both Nigeria, where he was part of a group of missionary priests known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, and North Dakota, where he spent several decades shepherding the prairie flock here. Many, far and wide, including in the Emerald country and here in the Heartland and there in the African jungle, have been touched by his life, which included a deep devotion to Jesus the Christ and his mother.\n\nSince his death this week, I have learned even more about him, including that one young lad, name of Bono, who eventually found his fame in a rock band known as U2, once stood by Fr. Hughes' side as one of his altar servers. And in our local paper this week, I learned he once captured video footage of the civil strife in Nigera in the late 1960s, which was aired on NBC. He was interviewed during this time on the Today Show.\n\nFr. Hughes' real claim to fame, though, was of a humbler variety; the simple loving of God and neighbor, and doing what was possible to make life a little more charitable to those who walked near him.\n\nI have not been able to find a link to that older story, so I am sharing it here, at the request of friends who now are yearning to remember, to hear his voice in phrases, to touch his wisdom and faith and love once more.\n\nMay the perpetual light shine upon you, dear Father Hughes. I have every confidence it will and then some.\n\n\nFather Hughes celebrates Golden Jubilee\n\n\n\nBy Roxane B. Salonen\n\n\n\n\nIn his half-century as a priest, Father Peter Hughes has experienced everything from the high of Mass with Pope John Paul II to the low of a brush with what might have been an untimely and brutal death. \n\n\n\n\nThe high took place in 1984 when Hughes, a native of Dublin, Ireland, was just starting his 28-year stint with the Diocese of Fargo. He’d had the fortunate experience of helping lead a three-bus caravan from North Dakota to Canada to meet and celebrate Mass with the former pontiff.\n\n\n\n\nThe low happened while on a missionary assignment in Nigeria. As part of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit Order known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, Fr. Hughes was helping introduce Jesus to Africa. But when a civil war erupted between Christians and Muslims, things turned unsafe, especially at night.\n\n\n\n\nOne evening, six militants broke through a dividing line and forced Father Hughes to drive them to the next town. “I put two in the front seat, four in the back, and one had a tommy-gun to my head,” he recounted. “It wasn’t until later that I realized how it could have gone. When I got into bed that night I started to tremble. He’d had his finger on the trigger.”\n\n\n\n\nDespite the difficult end, he’ll always remember that time as one of the most blessed of his priesthood. “The Church was thriving there at the time. I baptized about two thousand children a year. I once did 133 baptisms in one go.”\n\n\n\n\nWhen it was time to leave, Father Hughes made the transition with ease. The pattern of going easily from one thing to the next seems to have been set during his earliest years as the youngest of six children. “Of course, I always claim I was the neglected one,” he said, grinning.\n\n\n\n\nIn reality, it was a good life lived in a country rich in faith; a place in which the whole community worked to raise up the next generation. “You didn’t just answer to your parents for misbehaving, but to the locals, too,” he said.\n\n\n\n\nAn altar boy in his parish of St. Sylvester’s, the young Peter was formed by parents who greatly respected the Church and priesthood. One priest friend would come over every Monday night to eat dinner and play cards with the family. And music nearly always rang through the house.\n\n\n\n\n“My mother was an opera singer…and we’d have a party every Sunday night at our house. If you wanted to attend you had to play or sing a couple songs.”\n\n\n\n\nEventually, his father, owner of a grocery store and tea business, moved the family to the coast eight miles from the city. There, the kids swam in the ocean several times a day and stayed active in sports. “We lived beside a castle,” he said. “We had cricket, tennis, soccer – what a life, I tell you!”\n\n\n\n\nSoon after his mother died of heart failure, a teenaged Peter shared his thoughts of joining the priesthood with a local pastor. He finished high school in the seminary while continuing to enjoy his beloved cricket game and bicycling around his homeland.\n\n\n\n\nA year after his ordination on July 16, 1961, he left for Africa. Nearly instantly, he felt at home.\n\n\n\n\n“People say that it must be so different, but human nature is the same whether it’s in white skin or black skin,” he said. “And they gave us a great reception there. There were 306 of us Irish Holy Ghost priests in Nigeria.”\n\n\n\n\nAs civil strife increased, the priests became “black-listed” from the area. “They maintained we prolonged the war for 18 months because our guys started airlifting food and medicine every night for the Christians.” Recently, the ban was lifted.\n\n\n\n\nAfter a pause back home, Father Hughes went to Zambia, where he spent another 13 years. In 1983 he came to North Dakota to help one of his fellow Irish priests and was swiftly snatched up by Bishop Driscoll. “I arrived on a Monday, went to a funeral on Tuesday, and I got a letter in the mail the next morning appointing me to Jamestown.”\n\n\n\n\nThough North Dakota was no Africa, he took to the prairie quickly. “I’m a bush boy at heart,” he said. “I enjoy people no matter where I go, but I like North Dakotans and I like the pace here.”\n\n\n\n\nIn his many years of priesthood, he’s seen many changes within the Church, but appears to have it all in perspective. “I went to Africa 49 years ago to bring them into Christianity, and now they’re coming back to save our Christianity,” he said. “It’s all in Scripture. If God doesn’t get the grapes in one vineyard, he’ll go to another.”\n\n\n\n\nThat’s not to say the lack of gratitude he’s witnessed in “richer” countries doesn’t concern him. “You see people going to the lake, mowing the lawns, playing with their snowmobiles on a Sunday morning; that hurts me,” he said. “The more we have, the less time for God. It’s a material paganism.”\n\n\n\n\nHe added that though we’re surrounded by goodness, we’re not necessarily reaching those at the bottom of the steps outside. “Are we reaching the people who are not (in the pews)? Are we only saving the saved?”\n\n\n\n\nRegardless, he still finds the attempt to bring Christ to others worth the trouble. “That’s the joy of it, isn’t it?” he said, a sparkle in his Irish eyes.\n\n\n\n\nFather Hughes will celebrate his Golden Jubilee in his homeland, where he and a group of priest friends will convene for the first time in many years.\n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"I didn't know Fr. Peter Hughes well -- not as well as some in my life. I would see him at gatherings here and there during the years he served here, and I knew more than a few people who held him beloved. Then one day in 2011, I was given the honor of writing a story on him on the occasion of his golden jubilee as a priest. The day we sat down together, I discovered why he was such a magnet to so many.\n\n\n\nWith space constraints before me, my editor and I decided to let him do the talking. Our time at the now-defunct Cardinal Meunch Seminary in north Fargo is etched in my memory, in a precious place. Some of his thoughts became infused into the article that resulted, and the rest is simply in my heart, but I have called to mind his broad and loving perspective about God's hand in the world and in our lives many times over.\n\nFather Hughes' life ended where it began, in his homeland of Ireland; a place I also count as part of my ancestral grounding. The middle of his life, however, included long stops in both Nigeria, where he was part of a group of missionary priests known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, and North Dakota, where he spent several decades shepherding the prairie flock here. Many, far and wide, including in the Emerald country and here in the Heartland and there in the African jungle, have been touched by his life, which included a deep devotion to Jesus the Christ and his mother.\n\nSince his death this week, I have learned even more about him, including that one young lad, name of Bono, who eventually found his fame in a rock band known as U2, once stood by Fr. Hughes' side as one of his altar servers. And in our local paper this week, I learned he once captured video footage of the civil strife in Nigera in the late 1960s, which was aired on NBC. He was interviewed during this time on the Today Show.\n\nFr. Hughes' real claim to fame, though, was of a humbler variety; the simple loving of God and neighbor, and doing what was possible to make life a little more charitable to those who walked near him.\n\nI have not been able to find a link to that older story, so I am sharing it here, at the request of friends who now are yearning to remember, to hear his voice in phrases, to touch his wisdom and faith and love once more.\n\nMay the perpetual light shine upon you, dear Father Hughes. I have every confidence it will and then some.\n\n\nFather Hughes celebrates Golden Jubilee\n\n\n\nBy Roxane B. Salonen\n\n\n\n\nIn his half-century as a priest, Father Peter Hughes has experienced everything from the high of Mass with Pope John Paul II to the low of a brush with what might have been an untimely and brutal death. \n\n\n\n\nThe high took place in 1984 when Hughes, a native of Dublin, Ireland, was just starting his 28-year stint with the Diocese of Fargo. Hed had the fortunate experience of helping lead a three-bus caravan from North Dakota to Canada to meet and celebrate Mass with the former pontiff.\n\n\n\n\nThe low happened while on a missionary assignment in Nigeria. As part of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit Order known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, Fr. Hughes was helping introduce Jesus to Africa. But when a civil war erupted between Christians and Muslims, things turned unsafe, especially at night.\n\n\n\n\nOne evening, six militants broke through a dividing line and forced Father Hughes to drive them to the next town. I put two in the front seat, four in the back, and one had a tommy-gun to my head, he recounted. It wasnt until later that I realized how it could have gone. When I got into bed that night I started to tremble. Hed had his finger on the trigger.\n\n\n\n\nDespite the difficult end, hell always remember that time as one of the most blessed of his priesthood. The Church was thriving there at the time. I baptized about two thousand children a year. I once did 133 baptisms in one go.\n\n\n\n\nWhen it was time to leave, Father Hughes made the transition with ease. The pattern of going easily from one thing to the next seems to have been set during his earliest years as the youngest of six children. Of course, I always claim I was the neglected one, he said, grinning.\n\n\n\n\nIn reality, it was a good life lived in a country rich in faith; a place in which the whole community worked to raise up the next generation. You didnt just answer to your parents for misbehaving, but to the locals, too, he said.\n\n\n\n\nAn altar boy in his parish of St. Sylvesters, the young Peter was formed by parents who greatly respected the Church and priesthood. One priest friend would come over every Monday night to eat dinner and play cards with the family. And music nearly always rang through the house.\n\n\n\n\nMy mother was an opera singerand wed have a party every Sunday night at our house. If you wanted to attend you had to play or sing a couple songs.\n\n\n\n\nEventually, his father, owner of a grocery store and tea business, moved the family to the coast eight miles from the city. There, the kids swam in the ocean several times a day and stayed active in sports. We lived beside a castle, he said. We had cricket, tennis, soccer what a life, I tell you!\n\n\n\n\nSoon after his mother died of heart failure, a teenaged Peter shared his thoughts of joining the priesthood with a local pastor. He finished high school in the seminary while continuing to enjoy his beloved cricket game and bicycling around his homeland.\n\n\n\n\nA year after his ordination on July 16, 1961, he left for Africa. Nearly instantly, he felt at home.\n\n\n\n\nPeople say that it must be so different, but human nature is the same whether its in white skin or black skin, he said. And they gave us a great reception there. There were 306 of us Irish Holy Ghost priests in Nigeria.\n\n\n\n\nAs civil strife increased, the priests became black-listed from the area. They maintained we prolonged the war for 18 months because our guys started airlifting food and medicine every night for the Christians. Recently, the ban was lifted.\n\n\n\n\nAfter a pause back home, Father Hughes went to Zambia, where he spent another 13 years. In 1983 he came to North Dakota to help one of his fellow Irish priests and was swiftly snatched up by Bishop Driscoll. I arrived on a Monday, went to a funeral on Tuesday, and I got a letter in the mail the next morning appointing me to Jamestown.\n\n\n\n\nThough North Dakota was no Africa, he took to the prairie quickly. Im a bush boy at heart, he said. I enjoy people no matter where I go, but I like North Dakotans and I like the pace here.\n\n\n\n\nIn his many years of priesthood, hes seen many changes within the Church, but appears to have it all in perspective. I went to Africa 49 years ago to bring them into Christianity, and now theyre coming back to save our Christianity, he said. Its all in Scripture. If God doesnt get the grapes in one vineyard, hell go to another.\n\n\n\n\nThats not to say the lack of gratitude hes witnessed in richer countries doesnt concern him. You see people going to the lake, mowing the lawns, playing with their snowmobiles on a Sunday morning; that hurts me, he said. The more we have, the less time for God. Its a material paganism.\n\n\n\n\nHe added that though were surrounded by goodness, were not necessarily reaching those at the bottom of the steps outside. Are we reaching the people who are not (in the pews)? Are we only saving the saved?\n\n\n\n\nRegardless, he still finds the attempt to bring Christ to others worth the trouble. Thats the joy of it, isnt it? he said, a sparkle in his Irish eyes.\n\n\n\n\nFather Hughes will celebrate his Golden Jubilee in his homeland, where he and a group of priest friends will convene for the first time in many years.\n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"I didn't know Fr. Peter Hughes well -- not as well as some in my life. I would see him at gatherings here and there during the years he served here, and I knew more than a few people who held him beloved. Then one day in 2011, I was given the honor of writing a story on him on the occasion of his golden jubilee as a priest. The day we sat down together, I discovered why he was such a magnet to so many.\n\n\n\nWith space constraints before me, my editor and I decided to let him do the talking. Our time at the now-defunct Cardinal Meunch Seminary in north Fargo is etched in my memory, in a precious place. Some of his thoughts became infused into the article that resulted, and the rest is simply in my heart, but I have called to mind his broad and loving perspective about God's hand in the world and in our lives many times over.\n\nFather Hughes' life ended where it began, in his homeland of Ireland; a place I also count as part of my ancestral grounding. The middle of his life, however, included long stops in both Nigeria, where he was part of a group of missionary priests known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, and North Dakota, where he spent several decades shepherding the prairie flock here. Many, far and wide, including in the Emerald country and here in the Heartland and there in the African jungle, have been touched by his life, which included a deep devotion to Jesus the Christ and his mother.\n\nSince his death this week, I have learned even more about him, including that one young lad, name of Bono, who eventually found his fame in a rock band known as U2, once stood by Fr. Hughes' side as one of his altar servers. And in our local paper this week, I learned he once captured video footage of the civil strife in Nigera in the late 1960s, which was aired on NBC. He was interviewed during this time on the Today Show.\n\nFr. Hughes' real claim to fame, though, was of a humbler variety; the simple loving of God and neighbor, and doing what was possible to make life a little more charitable to those who walked near him.\n\nI have not been able to find a link to that older story, so I am sharing it here, at the request of friends who now are yearning to remember, to hear his voice in phrases, to touch his wisdom and faith and love once more.\n\nMay the perpetual light shine upon you, dear Father Hughes. I have every confidence it will and then some.\n\n\nFather Hughes celebrates Golden Jubilee\n\n\n\nBy Roxane B. Salonen\n\n\n\n\nIn his half-century as a priest, Father Peter Hughes has experienced everything from the high of Mass with Pope John Paul II to the low of a brush with what might have been an untimely and brutal death. \n\n\n\n\nThe high took place in 1984 when Hughes, a native of Dublin, Ireland, was just starting his 28-year stint with the Diocese of Fargo. Hed had the fortunate experience of helping lead a three-bus caravan from North Dakota to Canada to meet and celebrate Mass with the former pontiff.\n\n\n\n\nThe low happened while on a missionary assignment in Nigeria. As part of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit Order known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, Fr. Hughes was helping introduce Jesus to Africa. But when a civil war erupted between Christians and Muslims, things turned unsafe, especially at night.\n\n\n\n\nOne evening, six militants broke through a dividing line and forced Father Hughes to drive them to the next town. I put two in the front seat, four in the back, and one had a tommy-gun to my head, he recounted. It wasnt until later that I realized how it could have gone. When I got into bed that night I started to tremble. Hed had his finger on the trigger.\n\n\n\n\nDespite the difficult end, hell always remember that time as one of the most blessed of his priesthood. The Church was thriving there at the time. I baptized about two thousand children a year. I once did 133 baptisms in one go.\n\n\n\n\nWhen it was time to leave, Father Hughes made the transition with ease. The pattern of going easily from one thing to the next seems to have been set during his earliest years as the youngest of six children. Of course, I always claim I was the neglected one, he said, grinning.\n\n\n\n\nIn reality, it was a good life lived in a country rich in faith; a place in which the whole community worked to raise up the next generation. You didnt just answer to your parents for misbehaving, but to the locals, too, he said.\n\n\n\n\nAn altar boy in his parish of St. Sylvesters, the young Peter was formed by parents who greatly respected the Church and priesthood. One priest friend would come over every Monday night to eat dinner and play cards with the family. And music nearly always rang through the house.\n\n\n\n\nMy mother was an opera singerand wed have a party every Sunday night at our house. If you wanted to attend you had to play or sing a couple songs.\n\n\n\n\nEventually, his father, owner of a grocery store and tea business, moved the family to the coast eight miles from the city. There, the kids swam in the ocean several times a day and stayed active in sports. We lived beside a castle, he said. We had cricket, tennis, soccer what a life, I tell you!\n\n\n\n\nSoon after his mother died of heart failure, a teenaged Peter shared his thoughts of joining the priesthood with a local pastor. He finished high school in the seminary while continuing to enjoy his beloved cricket game and bicycling around his homeland.\n\n\n\n\nA year after his ordination on July 16, 1961, he left for Africa. Nearly instantly, he felt at home.\n\n\n\n\nPeople say that it must be so different, but human nature is the same whether its in white skin or black skin, he said. And they gave us a great reception there. There were 306 of us Irish Holy Ghost priests in Nigeria.\n\n\n\n\nAs civil strife increased, the priests became black-listed from the area. They maintained we prolonged the war for 18 months because our guys started airlifting food and medicine every night for the Christians. Recently, the ban was lifted.\n\n\n\n\nAfter a pause back home, Father Hughes went to Zambia, where he spent another 13 years. In 1983 he came to North Dakota to help one of his fellow Irish priests and was swiftly snatched up by Bishop Driscoll. I arrived on a Monday, went to a funeral on Tuesday, and I got a letter in the mail the next morning appointing me to Jamestown.\n\n\n\n\nThough North Dakota was no Africa, he took to the prairie quickly. Im a bush boy at heart, he said. I enjoy people no matter where I go, but I like North Dakotans and I like the pace here.\n\n\n\n\nIn his many years of priesthood, hes seen many changes within the Church, but appears to have it all in perspective. I went to Africa 49 years ago to bring them into Christianity, and now theyre coming back to save our Christianity, he said. Its all in Scripture. If God doesnt get the grapes in one vineyard, hell go to another.\n\n\n\n\nThats not to say the lack of gratitude hes witnessed in richer countries doesnt concern him. You see people going to the lake, mowing the lawns, playing with their snowmobiles on a Sunday morning; that hurts me, he said. The more we have, the less time for God. Its a material paganism.\n\n\n\n\nHe added that though were surrounded by goodness, were not necessarily reaching those at the bottom of the steps outside. Are we reaching the people who are not (in the pews)? Are we only saving the saved?\n\n\n\n\nRegardless, he still finds the attempt to bring Christ to others worth the trouble. Thats the joy of it, isnt it? he said, a sparkle in his Irish eyes.\n\n\n\n\nFather Hughes will celebrate his Golden Jubilee in his homeland, where he and a group of priest friends will convene for the first time in many years.\n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"roxane s.","author_s":"http://peacegardenmama.areavoices.com/author/roxane/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-21T05:01:30Z","displaydate":"2014-07-21 00:01:30","displaymodified":"2014-07-21 00:40:10","tags":["Father Peter Hughes"],"categories":["Meaningful Mondays"],"spell":["meaningful mondays: farewell to an irish blessing","I didn't know Fr. Peter Hughes well -- not as well as some in my life.  I would see him at gatherings here and there during the years he served here, and I knew more than a few people who held him beloved. Then one day in 2011, I was given the honor of writing a story on him on the occasion of his golden jubilee as a priest. The day we sat down together, I discovered why he was such a magnet to so many.\n\n\n\nWith space constraints before me, my editor and I decided to let him do the talking. Our time at the now-defunct Cardinal Meunch Seminary in north Fargo is etched in my memory, in a precious place. Some of his thoughts became infused into the article that resulted, and the rest is simply in my heart, but I have called to mind his broad and loving perspective about God's hand in the world and in our lives many times over.\n\nFather Hughes' life ended where it began, in his homeland of Ireland; a place I also count as part of my ancestral grounding. The middle of his life, however, included long stops in both Nigeria, where he was part of a group of missionary priests known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, and North Dakota, where he spent several decades shepherding the prairie flock here. Many, far and wide, including in the Emerald country and here in the Heartland and there in the African jungle, have been touched by his life, which included a deep devotion to Jesus the Christ and his mother.\n\nSince his death this week, I have learned even more about him, including that one young lad, name of Bono, who eventually found his fame in a rock band known as U2, once stood by Fr. Hughes' side as one of his altar servers. And in our local paper this week, I learned he once captured video footage of the civil strife in Nigera in the late 1960s, which was aired on NBC. He was interviewed during this time on the Today Show.\n\nFr. Hughes' real claim to fame, though, was of a humbler variety; the simple loving of God and neighbor, and doing what was possible to make life a little more charitable to those who walked near him.\n\nI have not been able to find a link to that older story, so I am sharing it here, at the request of friends who now are yearning to remember, to hear his voice in phrases, to touch his wisdom and faith and love once more.\n\nMay the perpetual light shine upon you, dear Father Hughes. I have every confidence it will and then some.\n\n\nFather Hughes celebrates Golden Jubilee\n\n\n\nBy Roxane B. Salonen\n\n\n\n\nIn his half-century as a priest, Father Peter Hughes has experienced everything from the high of Mass with Pope John Paul II to the low of a brush with what might have been an untimely and brutal death. \n\n\n\n\nThe high took place in 1984 when Hughes, a native of Dublin, Ireland, was just starting his 28-year stint with the Diocese of Fargo. He’d had the fortunate experience of helping lead a three-bus caravan from North Dakota to Canada to meet and celebrate Mass with the former pontiff.\n\n\n\n\nThe low happened while on a missionary assignment in Nigeria. As part of the Congregation of the Holy Spirit Order known as the Holy Ghost Fathers, Fr. Hughes was helping introduce Jesus to Africa. But when a civil war erupted between Christians and Muslims, things turned unsafe, especially at night.\n\n\n\n\nOne evening, six militants broke through a dividing line and forced Father Hughes to drive them to the next town. “I put two in the front seat, four in the back, and one had a tommy-gun to my head,” he recounted. “It wasn’t until later that I realized how it could have gone. When I got into bed that night I started to tremble. He’d had his finger on the trigger.”\n\n\n\n\nDespite the difficult end, he’ll always remember that time as one of the most blessed of his priesthood. “The Church was thriving there at the time. I baptized about two thousand children a year. I once did 133 baptisms in one go.”\n\n\n\n\nWhen it was time to leave, Father Hughes made the transition with ease. The pattern of going easily from one thing to the next seems to have been set during his earliest years as the youngest of six children. “Of course, I always claim I was the neglected one,” he said, grinning.\n\n\n\n\nIn reality, it was a good life lived in a country rich in faith; a place in which the whole community worked to raise up the next generation. “You didn’t just answer to your parents for misbehaving, but to the locals, too,” he said.\n\n\n\n\nAn altar boy in his parish of St. Sylvester’s, the young Peter was formed by parents who greatly respected the Church and priesthood. One priest friend would come over every Monday night to eat dinner and play cards with the family. And music nearly always rang through the house.\n\n\n\n\n“My mother was an opera singer…and we’d have a party every Sunday night at our house. If you wanted to attend you had to play or sing a couple songs.”\n\n\n\n\nEventually, his father, owner of a grocery store and tea business, moved the family to the coast eight miles from the city. There, the kids swam in the ocean several times a day and stayed active in sports. “We lived beside a castle,” he said. “We had cricket, tennis, soccer – what a life, I tell you!”\n\n\n\n\nSoon after his mother died of heart failure, a teenaged Peter shared his thoughts of joining the priesthood with a local pastor. He finished high school in the seminary while continuing to enjoy his beloved cricket game and bicycling around his homeland.\n\n\n\n\nA year after his ordination on July 16, 1961, he left for Africa. Nearly instantly, he felt at home.\n\n\n\n\n“People say that it must be so different, but human nature is the same whether it’s in white skin or black skin,” he said. “And they gave us a great reception there. There were 306 of us Irish Holy Ghost priests in Nigeria.”\n\n\n\n\nAs civil strife increased, the priests became “black-listed” from the area. “They maintained we prolonged the war for 18 months because our guys started airlifting food and medicine every night for the Christians.” Recently, the ban was lifted.\n\n\n\n\nAfter a pause back home, Father Hughes went to Zambia, where he spent another 13 years. In 1983 he came to North Dakota to help one of his fellow Irish priests and was swiftly snatched up by Bishop Driscoll. “I arrived on a Monday, went to a funeral on Tuesday, and I got a letter in the mail the next morning appointing me to Jamestown.”\n\n\n\n\nThough North Dakota was no Africa, he took to the prairie quickly. “I’m a bush boy at heart,” he said. “I enjoy people no matter where I go, but I like North Dakotans and I like the pace here.”\n\n\n\n\nIn his many years of priesthood, he’s seen many changes within the Church, but appears to have it all in perspective. “I went to Africa 49 years ago to bring them into Christianity, and now they’re coming back to save our Christianity,” he said. “It’s all in Scripture. If God doesn’t get the grapes in one vineyard, he’ll go to another.”\n\n\n\n\nThat’s not to say the lack of gratitude he’s witnessed in “richer” countries doesn’t concern him. “You see people going to the lake, mowing the lawns, playing with their snowmobiles on a Sunday morning; that hurts me,” he said. “The more we have, the less time for God. It’s a material paganism.”\n\n\n\n\nHe added that though we’re surrounded by goodness, we’re not necessarily reaching those at the bottom of the steps outside. “Are we reaching the people who are not (in the pews)? Are we only saving the saved?”\n\n\n\n\nRegardless, he still finds the attempt to bring Christ to others worth the trouble. “That’s the joy of it, isn’t it?” he said, a sparkle in his Irish eyes.\n\n\n\n\nFather Hughes will celebrate his Golden Jubilee in his homeland, where he and a group of priest friends will convene for the first time in many years.\n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\n\n \n\n\n \n\n ","roxane s."]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:braddokken.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":348,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"braddokken.areavoices.com/1637","permalink":"http://braddokken.areavoices.com/2014/07/18/dragonfly-event-set-at-norris-camp/","blogid":"23678","blogdomain":"braddokken.areavoices.com","hostname":"braddokken.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Dragonfly event set at Norris Camp","content":"Anyone interested in learning more about dragonflies is invited to attend an event set for July 25-26 at Norris Camp, headquarters of Red Lake Wildlife Management Area south of Roosevelt, Minn.\n\nThe event is part of the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project, a Minnesota Dragonfly Society initiative with a focus on dragonfly and damselfly conservation through research and education.\n\nThe weekend survey is being held in conjunction with the seventh annual Minnesota Dragonfly Gathering, which this year is at Norris Camp.\n\nThe activities kick off at 7 p.m. July 25 at Norris Camp with a potluck supper and program, which will include an introduction to the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project and instructions for the next day’s surveys.\n\nThe survey is set for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 26, and there’ll be a hot dog and potluck supper at 6 p.m. at Norris Camp, followed by an evening program at 7 p.m.\n\nThe public — and especially families — is welcome to attend and come for all or just part of the day.\n\nFor more information, contact Gretchen Mehmel, manager of Red Lake WMA, at (218) 783-6861 or check out the Minnesota Dragonfly Society’s website at mndragonfly.org.","rawcontent":"Anyone interested in learning more about dragonflies is invited to attend an event set for July 25-26 at Norris Camp, headquarters of Red Lake Wildlife Management Area south of Roosevelt, Minn.\n\nThe event is part of the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project, a Minnesota Dragonfly Society initiative with a focus on dragonfly and damselfly conservation through research and education.\n\nThe weekend survey is being held in conjunction with the seventh annual Minnesota Dragonfly Gathering, which this year is at Norris Camp.\n\nThe activities kick off at 7 p.m. July 25 at Norris Camp with a potluck supper and program, which will include an introduction to the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project and instructions for the next days surveys.\n\nThe survey is set for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 26, and therell be a hot dog and potluck supper at 6 p.m. at Norris Camp, followed by an evening program at 7 p.m.\n\nThe public and especially families is welcome to attend and come for all or just part of the day.\n\nFor more information, contact Gretchen Mehmel, manager of Red Lake WMA, at (218) 783-6861 or check out the Minnesota Dragonfly Societys website at mndragonfly.org.","contentnoshortcodes":"Anyone interested in learning more about dragonflies is invited to attend an event set for July 25-26 at Norris Camp, headquarters of Red Lake Wildlife Management Area south of Roosevelt, Minn.\n\nThe event is part of the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project, a Minnesota Dragonfly Society initiative with a focus on dragonfly and damselfly conservation through research and education.\n\nThe weekend survey is being held in conjunction with the seventh annual Minnesota Dragonfly Gathering, which this year is at Norris Camp.\n\nThe activities kick off at 7 p.m. July 25 at Norris Camp with a potluck supper and program, which will include an introduction to the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project and instructions for the next days surveys.\n\nThe survey is set for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 26, and therell be a hot dog and potluck supper at 6 p.m. at Norris Camp, followed by an evening program at 7 p.m.\n\nThe public and especially families is welcome to attend and come for all or just part of the day.\n\nFor more information, contact Gretchen Mehmel, manager of Red Lake WMA, at (218) 783-6861 or check out the Minnesota Dragonfly Societys website at mndragonfly.org.","numcomments":0,"author":"Brad Dokken","author_s":"http://braddokken.areavoices.com/author/bdokken/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-18T22:30:11Z","displaydate":"2014-07-18 17:30:11","displaymodified":"2014-07-18 17:30:11","tags":["dragonflies","Minnesota Dragonfly Society","Minnesota Odonata Survey Project","Norris Camp","outdoors"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Dragonfly event set at Norris Camp","Anyone interested in learning more about dragonflies is invited to attend an event set for July 25-26 at Norris Camp, headquarters of Red Lake Wildlife Management Area south of Roosevelt, Minn.\n\nThe event is part of the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project, a Minnesota Dragonfly Society initiative with a focus on dragonfly and damselfly conservation through research and education.\n\nThe weekend survey is being held in conjunction with the seventh annual Minnesota Dragonfly Gathering, which this year is at Norris Camp.\n\nThe activities kick off at 7 p.m. July 25 at Norris Camp with a potluck supper and program, which will include an introduction to the Minnesota Odonata Survey Project and instructions for the next day’s surveys.\n\nThe survey is set for 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. July 26, and there’ll be a hot dog and potluck supper at 6 p.m. at Norris Camp, followed by an evening program at 7 p.m.\n\nThe public — and especially families — is welcome to attend and come for all or just part of the day.\n\nFor more information, contact Gretchen Mehmel, manager of Red Lake WMA, at (218) 783-6861 or check out the Minnesota Dragonfly Society’s website at mndragonfly.org.","Brad Dokken"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:rosestreet.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":153,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"rosestreet.areavoices.com/85093","permalink":"http://rosestreet.areavoices.com/2013/11/12/its-holiday-time/","blogid":"939","blogdomain":"rosestreet.areavoices.com","hostname":"rosestreet.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"It's Holiday Time","content":"Holiday Message\nIf we all could take a minute away from personal attacks, maybe we could focus...even for a second...on something much more important.\nI would like to take this time, to focus on something that stirs a personal passion during the Christmas holidays each year.\nIt isn’t a unique place to visit or an attraction to experience. This something carries with it its own uniqueness and special experience through the act of doing.\nAt times it is difficult to realize, but we all have a lot to be thankful for each year. And this is definitely the season to be thankful.\nSo while we ponder and prepare for trips to family and friends across the country and elsewhere during this holiday season, lets not forget those for whom the holidays may be just another day on the calendar, another day to survive, another day without friends and family near.\nIt is difficult for many of us to believe that in this land of abundance there can be people suffering the pains of hunger or people freezing for lack of a roof or people lonely because they have not or cannot be together with family or friends.\nThis wonderful country has found remarkable answers for many crises, has diligently worked to right many wrongs and has provided much sought after freedom for its people and others far and beyond our borders.\nHowever, the answer to hunger, homelessness and loneliness for many in this country is still elusive.\nI have found Americans to be generous and caring people.\nDuring this long holiday season, if you can, please try to find a way to take an extra step of kindness. Donate to a food pantry; help out a homeless shelter…visit someone who you know will be alone at this time or hold a family member just a bit closer.\nAs much as you will helping others in ways far beyond your greatest expectations, you will truly be helping yourself in the knowledge that you made an important difference for someone.\nYou see, a little generosity and caring for others actually helps everyone.\nAnd, as my Dad directed me as a young boy, \"if you see someone without a smile….give ‘em one of yours\"!","rawcontent":"Holiday Message\nIf we all could take a minute away from personal attacks, maybe we could focus...even for a second...on something much more important.\nI would like to take this time, to focus on something that stirs a personal passion during the Christmas holidays each year.\nIt isnt a unique place to visit or an attraction to experience. This something carries with it its own uniqueness and special experience through the act of doing.\nAt times it is difficult to realize, but we all have a lot to be thankful for each year. And this is definitely the season to be thankful.\nSo while we ponder and prepare for trips to family and friends across the country and elsewhere during this holiday season, lets not forget those for whom the holidays may be just another day on the calendar, another day to survive, another day without friends and family near.\nIt is difficult for many of us to believe that in this land of abundance there can be people suffering the pains of hunger or people freezing for lack of a roof or people lonely because they have not or cannot be together with family or friends.\nThis wonderful country has found remarkable answers for many crises, has diligently worked to right many wrongs and has provided much sought after freedom for its people and others far and beyond our borders.\nHowever, the answer to hunger, homelessness and loneliness for many in this country is still elusive.\nI have found Americans to be generous and caring people.\nDuring this long holiday season, if you can, please try to find a way to take an extra step of kindness. Donate to a food pantry; help out a homeless sheltervisit someone who you know will be alone at this time or hold a family member just a bit closer.\nAs much as you will helping others in ways far beyond your greatest expectations, you will truly be helping yourself in the knowledge that you made an important difference for someone.\nYou see, a little generosity and caring for others actually helps everyone.\nAnd, as my Dad directed me as a young boy, \"if you see someone without a smile.give em one of yours\"!","contentnoshortcodes":"Holiday Message\nIf we all could take a minute away from personal attacks, maybe we could focus...even for a second...on something much more important.\nI would like to take this time, to focus on something that stirs a personal passion during the Christmas holidays each year.\nIt isnt a unique place to visit or an attraction to experience. This something carries with it its own uniqueness and special experience through the act of doing.\nAt times it is difficult to realize, but we all have a lot to be thankful for each year. And this is definitely the season to be thankful.\nSo while we ponder and prepare for trips to family and friends across the country and elsewhere during this holiday season, lets not forget those for whom the holidays may be just another day on the calendar, another day to survive, another day without friends and family near.\nIt is difficult for many of us to believe that in this land of abundance there can be people suffering the pains of hunger or people freezing for lack of a roof or people lonely because they have not or cannot be together with family or friends.\nThis wonderful country has found remarkable answers for many crises, has diligently worked to right many wrongs and has provided much sought after freedom for its people and others far and beyond our borders.\nHowever, the answer to hunger, homelessness and loneliness for many in this country is still elusive.\nI have found Americans to be generous and caring people.\nDuring this long holiday season, if you can, please try to find a way to take an extra step of kindness. Donate to a food pantry; help out a homeless sheltervisit someone who you know will be alone at this time or hold a family member just a bit closer.\nAs much as you will helping others in ways far beyond your greatest expectations, you will truly be helping yourself in the knowledge that you made an important difference for someone.\nYou see, a little generosity and caring for others actually helps everyone.\nAnd, as my Dad directed me as a young boy, \"if you see someone without a smile.give em one of yours\"!","numcomments":0,"author":"little joe","author_s":"http://rosestreet.areavoices.com/author/rosestreet/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-11-12T22:12:01Z","displaydate":"2013-11-12 16:12:01","displaymodified":"2013-11-12 16:12:01","tags":["ABC","All Outdoors Minnesota","CBS","christmas","CNN","family","Fargo Forum","friends","holidays","memories","minnesota","NBC","neighbors","news","North Dakota","senior","snow","tourism","winter"],"spell":["It's Holiday Time","Holiday Message\nIf we all could take a minute away from personal attacks, maybe we could focus...even for a second...on something much more important.\nI would like to take this time, to focus on something that stirs a personal passion during the Christmas holidays each year.\nIt isn’t a unique place to visit or an attraction to experience. This something carries with it its own uniqueness and special experience through the act of doing.\nAt times it is difficult to realize, but we all have a lot to be thankful for each year. And this is definitely the season to be thankful.\nSo while we ponder and prepare for trips to family and friends across the country and elsewhere during this holiday season, lets not forget those for whom the holidays may be just another day on the calendar, another day to survive, another day without friends and family near.\nIt is difficult for many of us to believe that in this land of abundance there can be people suffering the pains of hunger or people freezing for lack of a roof or people lonely because they have not or cannot be together with family or friends.\nThis wonderful country has found remarkable answers for many crises, has diligently worked to right many wrongs and has provided much sought after freedom for its people and others far and beyond our borders.\nHowever, the answer to hunger, homelessness and loneliness for many in this country is still elusive.\nI have found Americans to be generous and caring people.\nDuring this long holiday season, if you can, please try to find a way to take an extra step of kindness. Donate to a food pantry; help out a homeless shelter…visit someone who you know will be alone at this time or hold a family member just a bit closer.\nAs much as you will helping others in ways far beyond your greatest expectations, you will truly be helping yourself in the knowledge that you made an important difference for someone.\nYou see, a little generosity and caring for others actually helps everyone.\nAnd, as my Dad directed me as a young boy, \"if you see someone without a smile….give ‘em one of yours\"!","little joe"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:fairlycrafty.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":72,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"fairlycrafty.areavoices.com/1252","permalink":"http://fairlycrafty.areavoices.com/2013/04/08/recycled-art-mosaic-tile-part-2/","blogid":"25443","blogdomain":"fairlycrafty.areavoices.com","hostname":"fairlycrafty.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Recycled Art: Mosaic Tile (Part 2)","content":"A couple of months back, I created a mosaic for the Habitat for Humanity Recycled Art show, \"Home is Where the Art Is\". It was great to be involved in something like this, and I've never sold any of my own artwork so I had no idea what to expect.\n\nThere was a great variety of items at the show (<---check out the other pieces) and I was impressed and proud to be one of the contributing artists. It was a little bit nerve-wracking to glance at the silent auction sheet for my piece, though. Near the end of some hors d'oeuvre-eating and wine-sipping, the quiet fight over my piece began...and on one end of that fight was my very own mother-in-law, Robin! I kept telling her she didn't need to be bidding on my piece but she insisted that she truly did love it and would love to have it, and that the money was going toward a good cause. I even told her we could make one together! But my insisting was pointless.  I kept giving her the tsk, tsk every time she approached the paper to check out who was winning, and she would smile at me. She was bidding to win.\nAt the very end, my piece brought in $105. I was pretty shocked that something I created could be worth that much to someone, but it was also a really good feeling knowing the money was going toward a great organization.\nHere's Robin next to her new piece of artwork:\n\nAfter telling my mom about Robin's shenanigans, she said she would have done the same, and was sad she couldn't be here to do so. That spurred another moment of giving, and Robin and my mom are now sharing custody of the piece. It's a little silly and cute but very heart-warming that my mom and Robin think that highly of something I created. :)\n\n","rawcontent":"A couple of months back, I created a mosaic for the Habitat for Humanity Recycled Art show, \"Home is Where the Art Is\". It was great to be involved in something like this, and I've never sold any of my own artwork so I had no idea what to expect.\n\nThere was a great variety of items at the show (<---check out the other pieces) and I was impressed and proud to be one of the contributing artists. It was a little bit nerve-wracking to glance at the silent auction sheet for my piece, though. Near the end of some hors d'oeuvre-eating and wine-sipping, the quiet fight over my piece began...and on one end of that fight was my very own mother-in-law, Robin! I kept telling her she didn't need to be bidding on my piece but she insisted that she truly did love it and would love to have it, and that the money was going toward a good cause. I even told her we could make one together! But my insisting was pointless. I kept giving her the tsk, tsk every time she approached the paper to check out who was winning, and she would smile at me. She was bidding to win.\nAt the very end, my piece brought in $105. I was pretty shocked that something I created could be worth that much to someone, but it was also a really good feeling knowing the money was going toward a great organization.\nHere's Robin next to her new piece of artwork:\n\nAfter telling my mom about Robin's shenanigans, she said she would have done the same, and was sad she couldn't be here to do so. That spurred another moment of giving, and Robin and my mom are now sharing custody of the piece. It's a little silly and cute but very heart-warming that my mom and Robin think that highly of something I created. :)\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"A couple of months back, I created a mosaic for the Habitat for Humanity Recycled Art show, \"Home is Where the Art Is\". It was great to be involved in something like this, and I've never sold any of my own artwork so I had no idea what to expect.\n\nThere was a great variety of items at the show (<---check out the other pieces) and I was impressed and proud to be one of the contributing artists. It was a little bit nerve-wracking to glance at the silent auction sheet for my piece, though. Near the end of some hors d'oeuvre-eating and wine-sipping, the quiet fight over my piece began...and on one end of that fight was my very own mother-in-law, Robin! I kept telling her she didn't need to be bidding on my piece but she insisted that she truly did love it and would love to have it, and that the money was going toward a good cause. I even told her we could make one together! But my insisting was pointless. I kept giving her the tsk, tsk every time she approached the paper to check out who was winning, and she would smile at me. She was bidding to win.\nAt the very end, my piece brought in $105. I was pretty shocked that something I created could be worth that much to someone, but it was also a really good feeling knowing the money was going toward a great organization.\nHere's Robin next to her new piece of artwork:\n\nAfter telling my mom about Robin's shenanigans, she said she would have done the same, and was sad she couldn't be here to do so. That spurred another moment of giving, and Robin and my mom are now sharing custody of the piece. It's a little silly and cute but very heart-warming that my mom and Robin think that highly of something I created. :)\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Erin","author_s":"http://fairlycrafty.areavoices.com/author/efallgatter/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-04-08T20:39:32Z","displaydate":"2013-04-08 15:39:32","displaymodified":"2013-04-08 15:39:32","tags":["charity artwork","DIY tile mosaic","recycled art tile mosaic"],"categories":["Home Decor","My Life","Recycled Art"],"spell":["Recycled Art: Mosaic Tile (Part 2)","A couple of months back, I created a mosaic for the Habitat for Humanity Recycled Art show, \"Home is Where the Art Is\". It was great to be involved in something like this, and I've never sold any of my own artwork so I had no idea what to expect.\n\nThere was a great variety of items at the show (<---check out the other pieces) and I was impressed and proud to be one of the contributing artists. It was a little bit nerve-wracking to glance at the silent auction sheet for my piece, though. Near the end of some hors d'oeuvre-eating and wine-sipping, the quiet fight over my piece began...and on one end of that fight was my very own mother-in-law, Robin! I kept telling her she didn't need to be bidding on my piece but she insisted that she truly did love it and would love to have it, and that the money was going toward a good cause. I even told her we could make one together! But my insisting was pointless.  I kept giving her the tsk, tsk every time she approached the paper to check out who was winning, and she would smile at me. She was bidding to win.\nAt the very end, my piece brought in $105. I was pretty shocked that something I created could be worth that much to someone, but it was also a really good feeling knowing the money was going toward a great organization.\nHere's Robin next to her new piece of artwork:\n\nAfter telling my mom about Robin's shenanigans, she said she would have done the same, and was sad she couldn't be here to do so. That spurred another moment of giving, and Robin and my mom are now sharing custody of the piece. It's a little silly and cute but very heart-warming that my mom and Robin think that highly of something I created. :)\n\n","Erin"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:livingempowered.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":124,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"livingempowered.areavoices.com/1081","permalink":"http://livingempowered.areavoices.com/2012/12/the-30-habits-of-highly-empowered-women/","blogid":"3407","blogdomain":"livingempowered.areavoices.com","hostname":"livingempowered.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"The 30 Habits of Highly Empowered Women","content":"While doing a little dusting in the office, I spotted a well-worn copy of Steven Covey’s classic, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”.  This book first introduced us to concepts like the “abundance mentality” and the “upward spiral”, launching us down a path of personal development and growth, and a desire to support other women to do the same.\n\nSeeing that title again got us thinking about the habits of highly empowered women.  What qualities do these women have in common?  What is it that sets these women apart from their counterparts?  Some lively conversation and a brainstorming session later and we came up with quite a list:  “The 30 Habits of Highly Empowered Women”.\n\n1.    Empowered women know they have a mission to fulfill. They think, plan and live in accordance with their life purpose.\n\n2.    Empowered women set aside the stereotypes and instead choose to focus on being their best and most authentic self.\n\n3.    Empowered women know it’s o.k. to ask for what they want. They feel deserving of the best life has to offer.\n\n4.    Empowered women have an open mind. They welcome new ideas and often a change of mind is more like a change of limiting belief.\n\n5.    Empowered women see fear for what it is, “False Evidence Appearing Real”.\n\n6.    Empowered women spread love and kindness wherever they go. Their open hearts attract great opportunities and wonderful people to them!\n\n7.    Empowered women make their own self-care a top priority. They know they can’t help others if their personal energy is in short supply.\n\n8.    Empowered women show gratitude for all the gifts in their life. It’s this gratitude that brings them abundance!\n\n9.    Empowered women accept the differences in others. We’re all uniquely different (and equally important) after all!\n\n10.    Empowered women surround themselves with other empowered women. They know the support of others allows them to do really great things.\n\n11.    Empowered women close energy-sucking cycles in their lives. They know what’s important and can delegate or even dump the unnecessary.\n\n12.    Empowered women are clear on their core values and live according to them. It’s the only way to fulfill their life’s purpose.\n\n13.    Empowered women live a life of clarity. They know what they want to create or accomplish and they keep their eye on their goals daily.\n\n14.    Empowered women take 100% responsibility. No matter how difficult, they always have a choice, and every decision is theirs to make.\n\n15.    Empowered women believe anything is possible! They achieve because they believe!\n\n16.    Empowered women recognize when things aren’t working in their lives and make the necessary course corrections to get back on track.\n\n17.    Empowered women commit to constant and never-ending self-improvement. Knowledge is power!\n\n18.    Empowered women put more focus and attention on the positive than the negative.\n\n19.    Empowered women are constantly challenging their limits beliefs. They often question “why” and “why not”.\n\n20.    Empowered women live in present time consciousness. They experience each moment to the fullest.\n\n21.    Empowered women are honest with themselves and others. By living truthfully they will have no regrets!\n\n22.    Empowered women “pay” themselves first. When their financial house is in order, they have more ways and means to give to the world.\n\n23.    Empowered women empower themselves by empowering others. That’s all we’ve got to say about that!\n\n24.    Empowered women don’t fall into playing the blame game. “If it’s to be, it’s up to me,” is their mantra!\n\n25.    Empowered women know how to say no. They don’t let feelings of guilt or obligation keep them from what’s really important.\n\n26.    Empowered women never, never, never give up on their dreams and goals. They believe and achieve!\n\n27.    Empowered women have a strong relationship with their Creator, taking time for daily reflection and meditation.\n\n28.    Empowered women living in balance; mind, body and spirit.\n\n29.    Empowered women go over, under, around or through every challenge until they achieve their goals.\n\n30.    Empowered women spend life doing the “right” things, instead of just “more” things.\n\nOf course there are many, many more qualities that highly empowered women share.  What traits would have made your top habits list?  Please comment below.\n\nThe Soul Sisters","rawcontent":"While doing a little dusting in the office, I spotted a well-worn copy of Steven Coveys classic, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. This book first introduced us to concepts like the abundance mentality and the upward spiral, launching us down a path of personal development and growth, and a desire to support other women to do the same.\n\nSeeing that title again got us thinking about the habits of highly empowered women. What qualities do these women have in common? What is it that sets these women apart from their counterparts? Some lively conversation and a brainstorming session later and we came up with quite a list: The 30 Habits of Highly Empowered Women.\n\n1. Empowered women know they have a mission to fulfill. They think, plan and live in accordance with their life purpose.\n\n2. Empowered women set aside the stereotypes and instead choose to focus on being their best and most authentic self.\n\n3. Empowered women know its o.k. to ask for what they want. They feel deserving of the best life has to offer.\n\n4. Empowered women have an open mind. They welcome new ideas and often a change of mind is more like a change of limiting belief.\n\n5. Empowered women see fear for what it is, False Evidence Appearing Real.\n\n6. Empowered women spread love and kindness wherever they go. Their open hearts attract great opportunities and wonderful people to them!\n\n7. Empowered women make their own self-care a top priority. They know they cant help others if their personal energy is in short supply.\n\n8. Empowered women show gratitude for all the gifts in their life. Its this gratitude that brings them abundance!\n\n9. Empowered women accept the differences in others. Were all uniquely different (and equally important) after all!\n\n10. Empowered women surround themselves with other empowered women. They know the support of others allows them to do really great things.\n\n11. Empowered women close energy-sucking cycles in their lives. They know whats important and can delegate or even dump the unnecessary.\n\n12. Empowered women are clear on their core values and live according to them. Its the only way to fulfill their lifes purpose.\n\n13. Empowered women live a life of clarity. They know what they want to create or accomplish and they keep their eye on their goals daily.\n\n14. Empowered women take 100% responsibility. No matter how difficult, they always have a choice, and every decision is theirs to make.\n\n15. Empowered women believe anything is possible! They achieve because they believe!\n\n16. Empowered women recognize when things arent working in their lives and make the necessary course corrections to get back on track.\n\n17. Empowered women commit to constant and never-ending self-improvement. Knowledge is power!\n\n18. Empowered women put more focus and attention on the positive than the negative.\n\n19. Empowered women are constantly challenging their limits beliefs. They often question why and why not.\n\n20. Empowered women live in present time consciousness. They experience each moment to the fullest.\n\n21. Empowered women are honest with themselves and others. By living truthfully they will have no regrets!\n\n22. Empowered women pay themselves first. When their financial house is in order, they have more ways and means to give to the world.\n\n23. Empowered women empower themselves by empowering others. Thats all weve got to say about that!\n\n24. Empowered women dont fall into playing the blame game. If its to be, its up to me, is their mantra!\n\n25. Empowered women know how to say no. They dont let feelings of guilt or obligation keep them from whats really important.\n\n26. Empowered women never, never, never give up on their dreams and goals. They believe and achieve!\n\n27. Empowered women have a strong relationship with their Creator, taking time for daily reflection and meditation.\n\n28. Empowered women living in balance; mind, body and spirit.\n\n29. Empowered women go over, under, around or through every challenge until they achieve their goals.\n\n30. Empowered women spend life doing the right things, instead of just more things.\n\nOf course there are many, many more qualities that highly empowered women share. What traits would have made your top habits list? Please comment below.\n\nThe Soul Sisters","contentnoshortcodes":"While doing a little dusting in the office, I spotted a well-worn copy of Steven Coveys classic, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People. This book first introduced us to concepts like the abundance mentality and the upward spiral, launching us down a path of personal development and growth, and a desire to support other women to do the same.\n\nSeeing that title again got us thinking about the habits of highly empowered women. What qualities do these women have in common? What is it that sets these women apart from their counterparts? Some lively conversation and a brainstorming session later and we came up with quite a list: The 30 Habits of Highly Empowered Women.\n\n1. Empowered women know they have a mission to fulfill. They think, plan and live in accordance with their life purpose.\n\n2. Empowered women set aside the stereotypes and instead choose to focus on being their best and most authentic self.\n\n3. Empowered women know its o.k. to ask for what they want. They feel deserving of the best life has to offer.\n\n4. Empowered women have an open mind. They welcome new ideas and often a change of mind is more like a change of limiting belief.\n\n5. Empowered women see fear for what it is, False Evidence Appearing Real.\n\n6. Empowered women spread love and kindness wherever they go. Their open hearts attract great opportunities and wonderful people to them!\n\n7. Empowered women make their own self-care a top priority. They know they cant help others if their personal energy is in short supply.\n\n8. Empowered women show gratitude for all the gifts in their life. Its this gratitude that brings them abundance!\n\n9. Empowered women accept the differences in others. Were all uniquely different (and equally important) after all!\n\n10. Empowered women surround themselves with other empowered women. They know the support of others allows them to do really great things.\n\n11. Empowered women close energy-sucking cycles in their lives. They know whats important and can delegate or even dump the unnecessary.\n\n12. Empowered women are clear on their core values and live according to them. Its the only way to fulfill their lifes purpose.\n\n13. Empowered women live a life of clarity. They know what they want to create or accomplish and they keep their eye on their goals daily.\n\n14. Empowered women take 100% responsibility. No matter how difficult, they always have a choice, and every decision is theirs to make.\n\n15. Empowered women believe anything is possible! They achieve because they believe!\n\n16. Empowered women recognize when things arent working in their lives and make the necessary course corrections to get back on track.\n\n17. Empowered women commit to constant and never-ending self-improvement. Knowledge is power!\n\n18. Empowered women put more focus and attention on the positive than the negative.\n\n19. Empowered women are constantly challenging their limits beliefs. They often question why and why not.\n\n20. Empowered women live in present time consciousness. They experience each moment to the fullest.\n\n21. Empowered women are honest with themselves and others. By living truthfully they will have no regrets!\n\n22. Empowered women pay themselves first. When their financial house is in order, they have more ways and means to give to the world.\n\n23. Empowered women empower themselves by empowering others. Thats all weve got to say about that!\n\n24. Empowered women dont fall into playing the blame game. If its to be, its up to me, is their mantra!\n\n25. Empowered women know how to say no. They dont let feelings of guilt or obligation keep them from whats really important.\n\n26. Empowered women never, never, never give up on their dreams and goals. They believe and achieve!\n\n27. Empowered women have a strong relationship with their Creator, taking time for daily reflection and meditation.\n\n28. Empowered women living in balance; mind, body and spirit.\n\n29. Empowered women go over, under, around or through every challenge until they achieve their goals.\n\n30. Empowered women spend life doing the right things, instead of just more things.\n\nOf course there are many, many more qualities that highly empowered women share. What traits would have made your top habits list? Please comment below.\n\nThe Soul Sisters","numcomments":0,"author":"The Soul Sisters","author_s":"http://livingempowered.areavoices.com/author/soulsisters/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-12-04T16:30:05Z","displaydate":"2012-12-04 10:30:05","displaymodified":"2012-12-04 10:32:05","tags":["Arts and Entertainment","Education","Family","Food","Health","Money","shesays","Travel","Variety"],"categories":["Women's Empowerment"],"spell":["The 30 Habits of Highly Empowered Women","While doing a little dusting in the office, I spotted a well-worn copy of Steven Covey’s classic, “The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People”.  This book first introduced us to concepts like the “abundance mentality” and the “upward spiral”, launching us down a path of personal development and growth, and a desire to support other women to do the same.\n\nSeeing that title again got us thinking about the habits of highly empowered women.  What qualities do these women have in common?  What is it that sets these women apart from their counterparts?  Some lively conversation and a brainstorming session later and we came up with quite a list:  “The 30 Habits of Highly Empowered Women”.\n\n1.    Empowered women know they have a mission to fulfill. They think, plan and live in accordance with their life purpose.\n\n2.    Empowered women set aside the stereotypes and instead choose to focus on being their best and most authentic self.\n\n3.    Empowered women know it’s o.k. to ask for what they want. They feel deserving of the best life has to offer.\n\n4.    Empowered women have an open mind. They welcome new ideas and often a change of mind is more like a change of limiting belief.\n\n5.    Empowered women see fear for what it is, “False Evidence Appearing Real”.\n\n6.    Empowered women spread love and kindness wherever they go. Their open hearts attract great opportunities and wonderful people to them!\n\n7.    Empowered women make their own self-care a top priority. They know they can’t help others if their personal energy is in short supply.\n\n8.    Empowered women show gratitude for all the gifts in their life. It’s this gratitude that brings them abundance!\n\n9.    Empowered women accept the differences in others. We’re all uniquely different (and equally important) after all!\n\n10.    Empowered women surround themselves with other empowered women. They know the support of others allows them to do really great things.\n\n11.    Empowered women close energy-sucking cycles in their lives. They know what’s important and can delegate or even dump the unnecessary.\n\n12.    Empowered women are clear on their core values and live according to them. It’s the only way to fulfill their life’s purpose.\n\n13.    Empowered women live a life of clarity. They know what they want to create or accomplish and they keep their eye on their goals daily.\n\n14.    Empowered women take 100% responsibility. No matter how difficult, they always have a choice, and every decision is theirs to make.\n\n15.    Empowered women believe anything is possible! They achieve because they believe!\n\n16.    Empowered women recognize when things aren’t working in their lives and make the necessary course corrections to get back on track.\n\n17.    Empowered women commit to constant and never-ending self-improvement. Knowledge is power!\n\n18.    Empowered women put more focus and attention on the positive than the negative.\n\n19.    Empowered women are constantly challenging their limits beliefs. They often question “why” and “why not”.\n\n20.    Empowered women live in present time consciousness. They experience each moment to the fullest.\n\n21.    Empowered women are honest with themselves and others. By living truthfully they will have no regrets!\n\n22.    Empowered women “pay” themselves first. When their financial house is in order, they have more ways and means to give to the world.\n\n23.    Empowered women empower themselves by empowering others. That’s all we’ve got to say about that!\n\n24.    Empowered women don’t fall into playing the blame game. “If it’s to be, it’s up to me,” is their mantra!\n\n25.    Empowered women know how to say no. They don’t let feelings of guilt or obligation keep them from what’s really important.\n\n26.    Empowered women never, never, never give up on their dreams and goals. They believe and achieve!\n\n27.    Empowered women have a strong relationship with their Creator, taking time for daily reflection and meditation.\n\n28.    Empowered women living in balance; mind, body and spirit.\n\n29.    Empowered women go over, under, around or through every challenge until they achieve their goals.\n\n30.    Empowered women spend life doing the “right” things, instead of just “more” things.\n\nOf course there are many, many more qualities that highly empowered women share.  What traits would have made your top habits list?  Please comment below.\n\nThe Soul Sisters","The Soul Sisters"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:runningspud.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":1173,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"runningspud.areavoices.com/87633","permalink":"http://runningspud.areavoices.com/2014/07/08/keeping-tabs-through-apps/","blogid":"954","blogdomain":"runningspud.areavoices.com","hostname":"runningspud.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Apps to run by","content":"After running the Red, White and Boom half marathon, I decided to revisit the App Store for iTunes to see if there were any worthwhile downloads for runners. Mainly, I was looking for a pace calculator.\n\nFlipping through the numerous options, I settled on Pace Calc, which hit the mark. I also found MilePost, which will send inspirational quotes daily to your phone at the time you set.\n\nBut I also was looking for an app with a GPS function: something that would serve as a backup or replacement to my Garmin. There are plenty of options available.\n\nAs I read the app descriptions, and read the user reviews, I settled on Runmeter. It is pretty much unparalleled in reviews, and there's a free version. Even so, I decided to pay $4.99 for the Elite version because of the additional options available for the one-time upgrade cost.\n\nOn my first run, I simply pressed the start and stop buttons, and used it in conjunction with my Garmin. Runmeter served its purpose.\n\nThe next day, after running in really warm temps, I sat on the patio and flipped through the different Runmeter screens. The amount of data available was astounding and I realized how amazingly powerful this tool can be. While I really like my Garmin 910, which is a terrific GPS watch capable of tracking large amounts of data for multiple sports, I still keep a written log - where I keep track of my notes on the weather, shoes and how I feel, particularly if I am dealing with injuries or other aches and pains.\n\nBut Runmeter does all of that, too, if you want. It keeps track of weather, including humidity, and files each runs' data into a calendar, which provides a running mileage total for the week, month and year. I haven't even explored all of the options, or unlocked the apps' full potential, and I'm impressed. When I head out of town, and don't plan to race, there's no need to bring my Garmin. I'll just rely on Runmeter on my iPhone.","rawcontent":"After running the Red, White and Boom half marathon, I decided to revisit the App Store for iTunes to see if there were any worthwhile downloads for runners. Mainly, I was looking for a pace calculator.\n\nFlipping through the numerous options, I settled on Pace Calc, which hit the mark. I also found MilePost, which will send inspirational quotes daily to your phone at the time you set.\n\nBut I also was looking for an app with a GPS function: something that would serve as a backup or replacement to my Garmin. There are plenty of options available.\n\nAs I read the app descriptions, and read the user reviews, I settled on Runmeter. It is pretty much unparalleled in reviews, and there's a free version. Even so, I decided to pay $4.99 for the Elite version because of the additional options available for the one-time upgrade cost.\n\nOn my first run, I simply pressed the start and stop buttons, and used it in conjunction with my Garmin. Runmeter served its purpose.\n\nThe next day, after running in really warm temps, I sat on the patio and flipped through the different Runmeter screens. The amount of data available was astounding and I realized how amazingly powerful this tool can be. While I really like my Garmin 910, which is a terrific GPS watch capable of tracking large amounts of data for multiple sports, I still keep a written log - where I keep track of my notes on the weather, shoes and how I feel, particularly if I am dealing with injuries or other aches and pains.\n\nBut Runmeter does all of that, too, if you want. It keeps track of weather, including humidity, and files each runs' data into a calendar, which provides a running mileage total for the week, month and year. I haven't even explored all of the options, or unlocked the apps' full potential, and I'm impressed. When I head out of town, and don't plan to race, there's no need to bring my Garmin. I'll just rely on Runmeter on my iPhone.","contentnoshortcodes":"After running the Red, White and Boom half marathon, I decided to revisit the App Store for iTunes to see if there were any worthwhile downloads for runners. Mainly, I was looking for a pace calculator.\n\nFlipping through the numerous options, I settled on Pace Calc, which hit the mark. I also found MilePost, which will send inspirational quotes daily to your phone at the time you set.\n\nBut I also was looking for an app with a GPS function: something that would serve as a backup or replacement to my Garmin. There are plenty of options available.\n\nAs I read the app descriptions, and read the user reviews, I settled on Runmeter. It is pretty much unparalleled in reviews, and there's a free version. Even so, I decided to pay $4.99 for the Elite version because of the additional options available for the one-time upgrade cost.\n\nOn my first run, I simply pressed the start and stop buttons, and used it in conjunction with my Garmin. Runmeter served its purpose.\n\nThe next day, after running in really warm temps, I sat on the patio and flipped through the different Runmeter screens. The amount of data available was astounding and I realized how amazingly powerful this tool can be. While I really like my Garmin 910, which is a terrific GPS watch capable of tracking large amounts of data for multiple sports, I still keep a written log - where I keep track of my notes on the weather, shoes and how I feel, particularly if I am dealing with injuries or other aches and pains.\n\nBut Runmeter does all of that, too, if you want. It keeps track of weather, including humidity, and files each runs' data into a calendar, which provides a running mileage total for the week, month and year. I haven't even explored all of the options, or unlocked the apps' full potential, and I'm impressed. When I head out of town, and don't plan to race, there's no need to bring my Garmin. I'll just rely on Runmeter on my iPhone.","numcomments":0,"author":"Steve Wagner","author_s":"http://runningspud.areavoices.com/author/runningspud/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-09T02:05:15Z","displaydate":"2014-07-08 21:05:15","displaymodified":"2014-07-08 21:09:36","categories":["out on the roads"],"spell":["Apps to run by","After running the Red, White and Boom half marathon, I decided to revisit the App Store for iTunes to see if there were any worthwhile downloads for runners. Mainly, I was looking for a pace calculator.\n\nFlipping through the numerous options, I settled on Pace Calc, which hit the mark. I also found MilePost, which will send inspirational quotes daily to your phone at the time you set.\n\nBut I also was looking for an app with a GPS function: something that would serve as a backup or replacement to my Garmin. There are plenty of options available.\n\nAs I read the app descriptions, and read the user reviews, I settled on Runmeter. It is pretty much unparalleled in reviews, and there's a free version. Even so, I decided to pay $4.99 for the Elite version because of the additional options available for the one-time upgrade cost.\n\nOn my first run, I simply pressed the start and stop buttons, and used it in conjunction with my Garmin. Runmeter served its purpose.\n\nThe next day, after running in really warm temps, I sat on the patio and flipped through the different Runmeter screens. The amount of data available was astounding and I realized how amazingly powerful this tool can be. While I really like my Garmin 910, which is a terrific GPS watch capable of tracking large amounts of data for multiple sports, I still keep a written log - where I keep track of my notes on the weather, shoes and how I feel, particularly if I am dealing with injuries or other aches and pains.\n\nBut Runmeter does all of that, too, if you want. It keeps track of weather, including humidity, and files each runs' data into a calendar, which provides a running mileage total for the week, month and year. I haven't even explored all of the options, or unlocked the apps' full potential, and I'm impressed. When I head out of town, and don't plan to race, there's no need to bring my Garmin. I'll just rely on Runmeter on my iPhone.","Steve Wagner"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:sheleads.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":2,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"sheleads.areavoices.com/73","permalink":"http://sheleads.areavoices.com/2013/08/19/stuck/","blogid":"24571","blogdomain":"sheleads.areavoices.com","hostname":"sheleads.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"STUCK","content":"Stuck. Stuck. Stuck. Sometimes even leaders get stuck. Here we are. Not moving. Paralyzed. Wondering what happened. We might make it look easy from the outside, but leadership is hard work. Poise and confidence can be great hiding places for the nagging question of, “What now?”\n\nFor me, stuck can happen when a choice just didn’t work out as planned, an attempt to solve a problem comes up embarrassingly short, or I try a technique that doesn’t hit the mark. The larger the event in question, the more stuck I feel. Failure is a word that may even come to mind. Now what?\n\nTurns out, the “now what” moment is a critical crossroads. It is one that can separate the leaders from the rest of the pack. The “now what” moment offers us two options. \n\nWe can choose to stay stuck. In the midst of a crushing type of blow to your ego, staying stuck can be somewhat attractive. It doesn’t take much effort and we might even save ourselves from future pain and difficulties. But then again, I’ve never known a pity party that was well attended.\n\nThe other option? Learning. This is the solvent that can dissolve the adhesive and allow you to move forward. Looking at the situation, those involved, and your role with a critical eye is how leaders pull away from the pack. Try this:\n\n\tDetermine what worked.  It’s likely there were some pieces of the plan that were successful or still offer hope. What might those be? Keep them!\n\tStep back. As I’ve stated before, emotions aren’t exactly intelligent. Take a look at the situation as if it was a case study so that you remove the emotions from the picture. What do you see from this angle? What might need to be done differently?\n\tAsk questions. Look to a trusted mentor, those involved (if appropriate) or perhaps even other resources (online, books, etc). Ask what could be done differently, what they see, where the breakdown happened. Just make sure your questions are positive and genuine and don’t come across like blame or gossip.\n\tPersonally reflect. Think about your role in the situation and what you can learn about your own leadership as a result.\n\tCommunicate. It seems simple, but “seems” is a tricky word. Talk with others and by all means, don’t avoid conflict! Nothing gets better when a difficult situation is avoided or an elephant stays in the room. You may even want to try the curious approach.\n\tApply what you learn and move on. Figure out why you were stuck and what you might be able to do differently. Even if the plan isn’t perfect, it’s better than staying stuck!\n\nSo, next time you are slapped in the face with an unexpected result, you feel like a failure, or you are just plain stuck, resist the urge to stay where you are. When the question, “now what” rises in your throat, resist the emotional pull and dig into your questions. Learn what you can, apply it, and move on. That’s what leaders do.","rawcontent":"Stuck. Stuck. Stuck. Sometimes even leaders get stuck. Here we are. Not moving. Paralyzed. Wondering what happened. We might make it look easy from the outside, but leadership is hard work. Poise and confidence can be great hiding places for the nagging question of, What now?\n\nFor me, stuck can happen when a choice just didnt work out as planned, an attempt to solve a problem comes up embarrassingly short, or I try a technique that doesnt hit the mark. The larger the event in question, the more stuck I feel. Failure is a word that may even come to mind. Now what?\n\nTurns out, the now what moment is a critical crossroads. It is one that can separate the leaders from the rest of the pack. The now what moment offers us two options.\n\nWe can choose to stay stuck. In the midst of a crushing type of blow to your ego, staying stuck can be somewhat attractive. It doesnt take much effort and we might even save ourselves from future pain and difficulties. But then again, Ive never known a pity party that was well attended.\n\nThe other option? Learning. This is the solvent that can dissolve the adhesive and allow you to move forward. Looking at the situation, those involved, and your role with a critical eye is how leaders pull away from the pack. Try this:\n\nDetermine what worked. Its likely there were some pieces of the plan that were successful or still offer hope. What might those be? Keep them!\nStep back. As Ive stated before, emotions arent exactly intelligent. Take a look at the situation as if it was a case study so that you remove the emotions from the picture. What do you see from this angle? What might need to be done differently?\nAsk questions. Look to a trusted mentor, those involved (if appropriate) or perhaps even other resources (online, books, etc). Ask what could be done differently, what they see, where the breakdown happened. Just make sure your questions are positive and genuine and dont come across like blame or gossip.\nPersonally reflect. Think about your role in the situation and what you can learn about your own leadership as a result.\nCommunicate. It seems simple, but seems is a tricky word. Talk with others and by all means, dont avoid conflict! Nothing gets better when a difficult situation is avoided or an elephant stays in the room. You may even want to try the curious approach.\nApply what you learn and move on. Figure out why you were stuck and what you might be able to do differently. Even if the plan isnt perfect, its better than staying stuck!\n\nSo, next time you are slapped in the face with an unexpected result, you feel like a failure, or you are just plain stuck, resist the urge to stay where you are. When the question, now what rises in your throat, resist the emotional pull and dig into your questions. Learn what you can, apply it, and move on. Thats what leaders do.","contentnoshortcodes":"Stuck. Stuck. Stuck. Sometimes even leaders get stuck. Here we are. Not moving. Paralyzed. Wondering what happened. We might make it look easy from the outside, but leadership is hard work. Poise and confidence can be great hiding places for the nagging question of, What now?\n\nFor me, stuck can happen when a choice just didnt work out as planned, an attempt to solve a problem comes up embarrassingly short, or I try a technique that doesnt hit the mark. The larger the event in question, the more stuck I feel. Failure is a word that may even come to mind. Now what?\n\nTurns out, the now what moment is a critical crossroads. It is one that can separate the leaders from the rest of the pack. The now what moment offers us two options.\n\nWe can choose to stay stuck. In the midst of a crushing type of blow to your ego, staying stuck can be somewhat attractive. It doesnt take much effort and we might even save ourselves from future pain and difficulties. But then again, Ive never known a pity party that was well attended.\n\nThe other option? Learning. This is the solvent that can dissolve the adhesive and allow you to move forward. Looking at the situation, those involved, and your role with a critical eye is how leaders pull away from the pack. Try this:\n\nDetermine what worked. Its likely there were some pieces of the plan that were successful or still offer hope. What might those be? Keep them!\nStep back. As Ive stated before, emotions arent exactly intelligent. Take a look at the situation as if it was a case study so that you remove the emotions from the picture. What do you see from this angle? What might need to be done differently?\nAsk questions. Look to a trusted mentor, those involved (if appropriate) or perhaps even other resources (online, books, etc). Ask what could be done differently, what they see, where the breakdown happened. Just make sure your questions are positive and genuine and dont come across like blame or gossip.\nPersonally reflect. Think about your role in the situation and what you can learn about your own leadership as a result.\nCommunicate. It seems simple, but seems is a tricky word. Talk with others and by all means, dont avoid conflict! Nothing gets better when a difficult situation is avoided or an elephant stays in the room. You may even want to try the curious approach.\nApply what you learn and move on. Figure out why you were stuck and what you might be able to do differently. Even if the plan isnt perfect, its better than staying stuck!\n\nSo, next time you are slapped in the face with an unexpected result, you feel like a failure, or you are just plain stuck, resist the urge to stay where you are. When the question, now what rises in your throat, resist the emotional pull and dig into your questions. Learn what you can, apply it, and move on. Thats what leaders do.","numcomments":0,"author":"Jess Almlie","author_s":"http://sheleads.areavoices.com/author/jessalmlie/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-08-19T03:43:21Z","displaydate":"2013-08-19 03:43:21","displaymodified":"2013-08-19 03:43:36","categories":["Attitude","Change","Conflict","Discontent","Uncategorized"],"spell":["STUCK","Stuck. Stuck. Stuck. Sometimes even leaders get stuck. Here we are. Not moving. Paralyzed. Wondering what happened. We might make it look easy from the outside, but leadership is hard work. Poise and confidence can be great hiding places for the nagging question of, “What now?”\n\nFor me, stuck can happen when a choice just didn’t work out as planned, an attempt to solve a problem comes up embarrassingly short, or I try a technique that doesn’t hit the mark. The larger the event in question, the more stuck I feel. Failure is a word that may even come to mind. Now what?\n\nTurns out, the “now what” moment is a critical crossroads. It is one that can separate the leaders from the rest of the pack. The “now what” moment offers us two options. \n\nWe can choose to stay stuck. In the midst of a crushing type of blow to your ego, staying stuck can be somewhat attractive. It doesn’t take much effort and we might even save ourselves from future pain and difficulties. But then again, I’ve never known a pity party that was well attended.\n\nThe other option? Learning. This is the solvent that can dissolve the adhesive and allow you to move forward. Looking at the situation, those involved, and your role with a critical eye is how leaders pull away from the pack. Try this:\n\n\tDetermine what worked.  It’s likely there were some pieces of the plan that were successful or still offer hope. What might those be? Keep them!\n\tStep back. As I’ve stated before, emotions aren’t exactly intelligent. Take a look at the situation as if it was a case study so that you remove the emotions from the picture. What do you see from this angle? What might need to be done differently?\n\tAsk questions. Look to a trusted mentor, those involved (if appropriate) or perhaps even other resources (online, books, etc). Ask what could be done differently, what they see, where the breakdown happened. Just make sure your questions are positive and genuine and don’t come across like blame or gossip.\n\tPersonally reflect. Think about your role in the situation and what you can learn about your own leadership as a result.\n\tCommunicate. It seems simple, but “seems” is a tricky word. Talk with others and by all means, don’t avoid conflict! Nothing gets better when a difficult situation is avoided or an elephant stays in the room. You may even want to try the curious approach.\n\tApply what you learn and move on. Figure out why you were stuck and what you might be able to do differently. Even if the plan isn’t perfect, it’s better than staying stuck!\n\nSo, next time you are slapped in the face with an unexpected result, you feel like a failure, or you are just plain stuck, resist the urge to stay where you are. When the question, “now what” rises in your throat, resist the emotional pull and dig into your questions. Learn what you can, apply it, and move on. That’s what leaders do.","Jess Almlie"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:slowingtheracingmind.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":477,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"slowingtheracingmind.areavoices.com/3310","permalink":"http://slowingtheracingmind.areavoices.com/2014/07/20/guest-post-5-years-it-seems-impossible/","blogid":"25619","blogdomain":"slowingtheracingmind.areavoices.com","hostname":"slowingtheracingmind.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Guest Post: 5 Years - It Seems Impossible!","content":"I am thrilled to have Jeannine Sewall sharing on the blog today.  Our paths crossed at a Moms/Sons Weekend at Village Creek Bible Camp a few years ago. We have a lot in common and enjoy being Facebook friends.  Yesterday Jeannine posted this essay on Facebook, and I asked if I could share it as a post on my blog.  I am so grateful that she agreed.  Thanks, Jeannine!\n\nToday marks the fifth anniversary of my Mom's going home.  \n\nIt seems impossible to believe that much time has passed since she was suddenly and unexpectedly plucked from our lives.  It seems impossible that in that time, I have had two sons get their licenses, start and graduate from high school and the older one of them start and finish his first year of college.  My younger two sons have finished elementary school and moved onto middle school.  My brother started and graduated from college and started his career as a nurse.  My step-dad has re-married and relocated twice already! And what does all that have to do with my mom's passing?  It seemed impossible at the time life could move on, but it has.\n\nIn those first few days/weeks after my mom died, it seemed impossible in some moments for me to breathe, let alone get up, shower, go to work and carry on with life.  They were hard, grief filled days of sorrow and missing; heavy days where \"gravity becomes so physical you wonder if the horizon changed directions\" and you just never noticed.  How could we ever move on?  But since the sun continues to rise and set despite the missing; hours turned into days, days into weeks and weeks into years and we are at another anniversary.\n\nAnd it's a strange thing, the anniversary of losing someone...do you celebrate?  Do you grieve openly without feeling like you're looking for pity or that you should have \"moved on already?\"  Does it make others feel uncomfortable and if they do, is that their problem or mine?  Even the theraputic effect sharing my feelings with the written word offers...there's a part of me that wonders if after 5 years, I should remember alone? Grief becomes a solitary journey the more time passes.  But I can say,  even 5 years later, I sometimes feel like I want/need the affirmation that it's still okay to cry because I miss my mom; especially on days like today.\n\nSo while it seems impossible we could ever move on after the loss of my mom, we have and we are.  The Lord continues to offer His love and comfort each and every day.   I am able to look up and see my God who sees me; who has grieved with me and who comforts me.  I have had friends who have walked along side and while the journey has grown more solitary, they are always there on days I need them.  God has raised up women in my life who stand in the gap for my mom. I love them and am so grateful for their presence.  My brother and I continue to share a close relationship and we remember together.  And on those tear filled days, when the missing still takes my breath away, while it seems impossible, I am able to look forward with hope to an incredible reunion and I know without a doubt my mom is more alive today than she was on this morning 5 years ago.  It seems impossible, but I am really and truely jealous of her.\n\n5 years....it seems impossible.  Love and miss you Mom!  Save a place for me!!\n\n\"But Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.”~Matthew 19:26\n\nAbout the author: Jeannine is a wife and busy mother of four boys. She works in property management, writes for FreshStart Devotions, and actively walks besides those experiencing grief.  Jeannine lost her mom 5 years ago in a car accident and shares openly and honestly about her journey through grief and \"the missing.\"","rawcontent":"I am thrilled to have Jeannine Sewall sharing on the blog today. Our paths crossed at a Moms/Sons Weekend at Village Creek Bible Camp a few years ago. We have a lot in common and enjoy being Facebook friends. Yesterday Jeannine posted this essay on Facebook, and I asked if I could share it as a post on my blog. I am so grateful that she agreed. Thanks, Jeannine!\n\nToday marks the fifth anniversary of my Mom's going home. \n\nIt seems impossible to believe that much time has passed since she was suddenly and unexpectedly plucked from our lives. It seems impossible that in that time, I have had two sons get their licenses, start and graduate from high school and the older one of them start and finish his first year of college. My younger two sons have finished elementary school and moved onto middle school. My brother started and graduated from college and started his career as a nurse. My step-dad has re-married and relocated twice already! And what does all that have to do with my mom's passing? It seemed impossible at the time life could move on, but it has.\n\nIn those first few days/weeks after my mom died, it seemed impossible in some moments for me to breathe, let alone get up, shower, go to work and carry on with life. They were hard, grief filled days of sorrow and missing; heavy days where \"gravity becomes so physical you wonder if the horizon changed directions\" and you just never noticed. How could we ever move on? But since the sun continues to rise and set despite the missing; hours turned into days, days into weeks and weeks into years and we are at another anniversary.\n\nAnd it's a strange thing, the anniversary of losing someone...do you celebrate? Do you grieve openly without feeling like you're looking for pity or that you should have \"moved on already?\" Does it make others feel uncomfortable and if they do, is that their problem or mine? Even the theraputic effect sharing my feelings with the written word offers...there's a part of me that wonders if after 5 years, I should remember alone? Grief becomes a solitary journey the more time passes. But I can say, even 5 years later, I sometimes feel like I want/need the affirmation that it's still okay to cry because I miss my mom; especially on days like today.\n\nSo while it seems impossible we could ever move on after the loss of my mom, we have and we are. The Lord continues to offer His love and comfort each and every day. I am able to look up and see my God who sees me; who has grieved with me and who comforts me. I have had friends who have walked along side and while the journey has grown more solitary, they are always there on days I need them. God has raised up women in my life who stand in the gap for my mom. I love them and am so grateful for their presence. My brother and I continue to share a close relationship and we remember together. And on those tear filled days, when the missing still takes my breath away, while it seems impossible, I am able to look forward with hope to an incredible reunion and I know without a doubt my mom is more alive today than she was on this morning 5 years ago. It seems impossible, but I am really and truely jealous of her.\n\n5 years....it seems impossible. Love and miss you Mom! Save a place for me!!\n\n\"But Jesus looked at them and said, With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.~Matthew 19:26\n\nAbout the author: Jeannine is a wife and busy mother of four boys. She works in property management, writes for FreshStart Devotions, and actively walks besides those experiencing grief. Jeannine lost her mom 5 years ago in a car accident and shares openly and honestly about her journey through grief and \"the missing.\"","contentnoshortcodes":"I am thrilled to have Jeannine Sewall sharing on the blog today. Our paths crossed at a Moms/Sons Weekend at Village Creek Bible Camp a few years ago. We have a lot in common and enjoy being Facebook friends. Yesterday Jeannine posted this essay on Facebook, and I asked if I could share it as a post on my blog. I am so grateful that she agreed. Thanks, Jeannine!\n\nToday marks the fifth anniversary of my Mom's going home. \n\nIt seems impossible to believe that much time has passed since she was suddenly and unexpectedly plucked from our lives. It seems impossible that in that time, I have had two sons get their licenses, start and graduate from high school and the older one of them start and finish his first year of college. My younger two sons have finished elementary school and moved onto middle school. My brother started and graduated from college and started his career as a nurse. My step-dad has re-married and relocated twice already! And what does all that have to do with my mom's passing? It seemed impossible at the time life could move on, but it has.\n\nIn those first few days/weeks after my mom died, it seemed impossible in some moments for me to breathe, let alone get up, shower, go to work and carry on with life. They were hard, grief filled days of sorrow and missing; heavy days where \"gravity becomes so physical you wonder if the horizon changed directions\" and you just never noticed. How could we ever move on? But since the sun continues to rise and set despite the missing; hours turned into days, days into weeks and weeks into years and we are at another anniversary.\n\nAnd it's a strange thing, the anniversary of losing someone...do you celebrate? Do you grieve openly without feeling like you're looking for pity or that you should have \"moved on already?\" Does it make others feel uncomfortable and if they do, is that their problem or mine? Even the theraputic effect sharing my feelings with the written word offers...there's a part of me that wonders if after 5 years, I should remember alone? Grief becomes a solitary journey the more time passes. But I can say, even 5 years later, I sometimes feel like I want/need the affirmation that it's still okay to cry because I miss my mom; especially on days like today.\n\nSo while it seems impossible we could ever move on after the loss of my mom, we have and we are. The Lord continues to offer His love and comfort each and every day. I am able to look up and see my God who sees me; who has grieved with me and who comforts me. I have had friends who have walked along side and while the journey has grown more solitary, they are always there on days I need them. God has raised up women in my life who stand in the gap for my mom. I love them and am so grateful for their presence. My brother and I continue to share a close relationship and we remember together. And on those tear filled days, when the missing still takes my breath away, while it seems impossible, I am able to look forward with hope to an incredible reunion and I know without a doubt my mom is more alive today than she was on this morning 5 years ago. It seems impossible, but I am really and truely jealous of her.\n\n5 years....it seems impossible. Love and miss you Mom! Save a place for me!!\n\n\"But Jesus looked at them and said, With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.~Matthew 19:26\n\nAbout the author: Jeannine is a wife and busy mother of four boys. She works in property management, writes for FreshStart Devotions, and actively walks besides those experiencing grief. Jeannine lost her mom 5 years ago in a car accident and shares openly and honestly about her journey through grief and \"the missing.\"","numcomments":0,"author":"Stacy Bender","author_s":"http://slowingtheracingmind.areavoices.com/author/slowingtheracingmind/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-21T02:55:36Z","displaydate":"2014-07-20 21:55:36","displaymodified":"2014-07-20 21:55:36","tags":["death","grief","mother","tears"],"categories":["Faith","Thoughts"],"spell":["Guest Post: 5 Years - It Seems Impossible!","I am thrilled to have Jeannine Sewall sharing on the blog today.  Our paths crossed at a Moms/Sons Weekend at Village Creek Bible Camp a few years ago. We have a lot in common and enjoy being Facebook friends.  Yesterday Jeannine posted this essay on Facebook, and I asked if I could share it as a post on my blog.  I am so grateful that she agreed.  Thanks, Jeannine!\n\nToday marks the fifth anniversary of my Mom's going home.  \n\nIt seems impossible to believe that much time has passed since she was suddenly and unexpectedly plucked from our lives.  It seems impossible that in that time, I have had two sons get their licenses, start and graduate from high school and the older one of them start and finish his first year of college.  My younger two sons have finished elementary school and moved onto middle school.  My brother started and graduated from college and started his career as a nurse.  My step-dad has re-married and relocated twice already! And what does all that have to do with my mom's passing?  It seemed impossible at the time life could move on, but it has.\n\nIn those first few days/weeks after my mom died, it seemed impossible in some moments for me to breathe, let alone get up, shower, go to work and carry on with life.  They were hard, grief filled days of sorrow and missing; heavy days where \"gravity becomes so physical you wonder if the horizon changed directions\" and you just never noticed.  How could we ever move on?  But since the sun continues to rise and set despite the missing; hours turned into days, days into weeks and weeks into years and we are at another anniversary.\n\nAnd it's a strange thing, the anniversary of losing someone...do you celebrate?  Do you grieve openly without feeling like you're looking for pity or that you should have \"moved on already?\"  Does it make others feel uncomfortable and if they do, is that their problem or mine?  Even the theraputic effect sharing my feelings with the written word offers...there's a part of me that wonders if after 5 years, I should remember alone? Grief becomes a solitary journey the more time passes.  But I can say,  even 5 years later, I sometimes feel like I want/need the affirmation that it's still okay to cry because I miss my mom; especially on days like today.\n\nSo while it seems impossible we could ever move on after the loss of my mom, we have and we are.  The Lord continues to offer His love and comfort each and every day.   I am able to look up and see my God who sees me; who has grieved with me and who comforts me.  I have had friends who have walked along side and while the journey has grown more solitary, they are always there on days I need them.  God has raised up women in my life who stand in the gap for my mom. I love them and am so grateful for their presence.  My brother and I continue to share a close relationship and we remember together.  And on those tear filled days, when the missing still takes my breath away, while it seems impossible, I am able to look forward with hope to an incredible reunion and I know without a doubt my mom is more alive today than she was on this morning 5 years ago.  It seems impossible, but I am really and truely jealous of her.\n\n5 years....it seems impossible.  Love and miss you Mom!  Save a place for me!!\n\n\"But Jesus looked at them and said, “With man this is impossible, but with God all things are possible.”~Matthew 19:26\n\nAbout the author: Jeannine is a wife and busy mother of four boys. She works in property management, writes for FreshStart Devotions, and actively walks besides those experiencing grief.  Jeannine lost her mom 5 years ago in a car accident and shares openly and honestly about her journey through grief and \"the missing.\"","Stacy Bender"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:redriverfreethinkers.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":1411,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"redriverfreethinkers.areavoices.com/16193","permalink":"http://redriverfreethinkers.areavoices.com/2014/07/22/the-computer-squeezes-the-church-in-two-ways/","blogid":"3455","blogdomain":"redriverfreethinkers.areavoices.com","hostname":"redriverfreethinkers.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"The Computer Squeezes the Church in Two Ways.","content":"The link reviews an article written many years ago, long before the web was carried around in a phone.  We all know what has happened, technology has taken away leisure time, not made more of it.\n\nThe priest who wrote the link was surprisingly accurate when he made the observation that organized religion is not something so important people make time for no matter what.  Instead, it is dependent on people having leisure time available.\n\nHe also makes the observation I have made here many times--that the computer is a competitive source of information to the Church.  He wrote the computer has become the Church itself in this sense.\n\nI have to confess I, along with my economist colleages, was unimpressed in the early days of the \"computer relvolution.\"  It seemed to me to be just another tool, like the air hammer that breaks up concrete and the automatic trasmission on cars.  Both changed the way things were done, but not what was done.\n\nI now see that it has had a far reaching effect on how people think.  It has changed how people spend their time both when working and when not working.  It has giving both the wealthy/powerful and the lowly bottom-of-the-rung certain weapons to use against each other.\n\nFor the \"religious class\", the set of people who live off the time and donations of the public, all this is a lose-lose. There is less time for church and less reverence for what it is.\n\nPlease, the Priest asks, spend more time with me.\n\nhttp://www.thecatholicthing.org/columns/2014/catholicism-and-the-perils-of-technology.html","rawcontent":"The link reviews an article written many years ago, long beforethe web was carried around in a phone.We allknow what has happened, technology has taken away leisure time, not made more of it.\n\nThe priest who wrote the link was surprisingly accurate when he made the observation that organized religion is not something so importantpeople make time forno matter what. Instead, it is dependent on people having leisure time available.\n\nHe also makes the observation I have made here many times--that the computer is a competitive source of information to the Church. He wrote the computer has become the Church itself in this sense.\n\nI have toconfess I, along with my economistcolleages,was unimpressed in the early days of the \"computer relvolution.\" It seemed to me to be just another tool, like the air hammer that breaks up concreteand the automatic trasmission oncars. Both changed the way things were done, but not what was done.\n\nI now see that it has had a far reaching effect on how people think. It has changed how people spend their time both when working and when not working. It has giving both the wealthy/powerful and the lowly bottom-of-the-rung certain weapons to use against each other.\n\nFor the \"religious class\", the set of people who live off the time and donations of the public, all this is a lose-lose. There is less time for church and less reverence for what it is.\n\nPlease,the Priestasks, spend more timewith me.\n\nhttp://www.thecatholicthing.org/columns/2014/catholicism-and-the-perils-of-technology.html","contentnoshortcodes":"The link reviews an article written many years ago, long beforethe web was carried around in a phone.We allknow what has happened, technology has taken away leisure time, not made more of it.\n\nThe priest who wrote the link was surprisingly accurate when he made the observation that organized religion is not something so importantpeople make time forno matter what. Instead, it is dependent on people having leisure time available.\n\nHe also makes the observation I have made here many times--that the computer is a competitive source of information to the Church. He wrote the computer has become the Church itself in this sense.\n\nI have toconfess I, along with my economistcolleages,was unimpressed in the early days of the \"computer relvolution.\" It seemed to me to be just another tool, like the air hammer that breaks up concreteand the automatic trasmission oncars. Both changed the way things were done, but not what was done.\n\nI now see that it has had a far reaching effect on how people think. It has changed how people spend their time both when working and when not working. It has giving both the wealthy/powerful and the lowly bottom-of-the-rung certain weapons to use against each other.\n\nFor the \"religious class\", the set of people who live off the time and donations of the public, all this is a lose-lose. There is less time for church and less reverence for what it is.\n\nPlease,the Priestasks, spend more timewith me.\n\nhttp://www.thecatholicthing.org/columns/2014/catholicism-and-the-perils-of-technology.html","numcomments":0,"author":"Jon Lindgren","author_s":"http://redriverfreethinkers.areavoices.com/author/jonlind/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-22T01:18:05Z","displaydate":"2014-07-22 01:18:05","displaymodified":"2014-07-22 01:18:05","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["The Computer Squeezes the Church in Two Ways.","The link reviews an article written many years ago, long before the web was carried around in a phone.  We all know what has happened, technology has taken away leisure time, not made more of it.\n\nThe priest who wrote the link was surprisingly accurate when he made the observation that organized religion is not something so important people make time for no matter what.  Instead, it is dependent on people having leisure time available.\n\nHe also makes the observation I have made here many times--that the computer is a competitive source of information to the Church.  He wrote the computer has become the Church itself in this sense.\n\nI have to confess I, along with my economist colleages, was unimpressed in the early days of the \"computer relvolution.\"  It seemed to me to be just another tool, like the air hammer that breaks up concrete and the automatic trasmission on cars.  Both changed the way things were done, but not what was done.\n\nI now see that it has had a far reaching effect on how people think.  It has changed how people spend their time both when working and when not working.  It has giving both the wealthy/powerful and the lowly bottom-of-the-rung certain weapons to use against each other.\n\nFor the \"religious class\", the set of people who live off the time and donations of the public, all this is a lose-lose. There is less time for church and less reverence for what it is.\n\nPlease, the Priest asks, spend more time with me.\n\nhttp://www.thecatholicthing.org/columns/2014/catholicism-and-the-perils-of-technology.html","Jon Lindgren"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:kitchencourage.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":231,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"kitchencourage.areavoices.com/1404","permalink":"http://kitchencourage.areavoices.com/2014/07/19/italian-sausage-and-cheese-dip/","blogid":"11474","blogdomain":"kitchencourage.areavoices.com","hostname":"kitchencourage.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Italian Sausage and Cheese Dip","content":"I have not fallen in love with Velveeta, but the stuff does have its uses. One is a version of that old favorite, cheese and sausage dip, introduced to Jerri and me by our neighbors, Jill and Lonnie. \n\nThis version was brought north from Oklahoma and uses sweet Italian sausage instead of ordinary breakfast sausage. It is a delicious combination that will please most everyone except your vegetarian friends. You can make a tasty vegetarian version without the sausage but with a finely chopped jalapeño pepper for a little extra flavor. \n\nINGREDIENTS:\n\n3/4 - 1 lb. sweet Italian sausage\n3/4 - 1 pound Velveeta or any processed American cheese\n1 10 oz. can Rotel or other brand diced tomatoes and green chilies\n\nPROCEDURE:\n\nBrown the sausage over low heat, taking care not to make it crisp. Drain it thoroughly. \n\nCut the cheese into half inch cubes. Put the cheese and tomatoes into a bowl and microwave it until the cheese is melted. Stir once or twice so the cheese melts evenly.\n\n Mix the sausage into the cheese and tomato mixture and microwave again until the dip is very warm.\n\nServe warm with tortilla chips or scoops.\n\nNOTES: You can put the dip into a small crockpot to keep it warm, but a half dozen people can finish this dip before it gets cold if you set a good example. You can also pop it back into the microwave for a few seconds if the dip gets too cool.\n\nIf you make the vegetarian version, wash and cut the stem off the pepper, then slice in fourths, remove the seeds and white membrane, and chop the pepper into an eighth inch dice. Add the chopped pepper when you are first melting the cheese, then stir in the diced tomatoes and warm the dish for serving.\n","rawcontent":"I have not fallen in love with Velveeta, but the stuff does have its uses. One is a version of that old favorite, cheese and sausage dip, introduced to Jerri and me by our neighbors, Jill and Lonnie. \n\nThis version was brought north from Oklahoma and uses sweet Italian sausage instead of ordinary breakfast sausage. It is a delicious combination that will please most everyone except your vegetarian friends. You can make a tasty vegetarian version without the sausage but with a finely chopped jalapeo pepper for a little extra flavor. \n\nINGREDIENTS:\n\n3/4 - 1 lb. sweet Italian sausage\n3/4 - 1 pound Velveeta or any processed American cheese\n1 10 oz. can Rotel or other brand diced tomatoes and green chilies\n\nPROCEDURE:\n\nBrown the sausage over low heat, taking care not to make it crisp. Drain it thoroughly. \n\nCut the cheese into half inch cubes. Put the cheese and tomatoes into a bowl and microwave it until the cheese is melted. Stir once or twice so the cheese melts evenly.\n\n Mix the sausage into the cheese and tomato mixture and microwave again until the dip is very warm.\n\nServe warm with tortilla chips or scoops.\n\nNOTES: You can put the dip into a small crockpot to keep it warm, but a half dozen people can finish this dip before it gets cold if you set a good example. You can also pop it back into the microwave for a few seconds if the dip gets too cool.\n\nIf you make the vegetarian version, wash and cut the stem off the pepper, then slice in fourths, remove the seeds and white membrane, and chop the pepper into an eighth inch dice. Add the chopped pepper when you are first melting the cheese, then stir in the diced tomatoes and warm the dish for serving.\n","contentnoshortcodes":"I have not fallen in love with Velveeta, but the stuff does have its uses. One is a version of that old favorite, cheese and sausage dip, introduced to Jerri and me by our neighbors, Jill and Lonnie. \n\nThis version was brought north from Oklahoma and uses sweet Italian sausage instead of ordinary breakfast sausage. It is a delicious combination that will please most everyone except your vegetarian friends. You can make a tasty vegetarian version without the sausage but with a finely chopped jalapeo pepper for a little extra flavor. \n\nINGREDIENTS:\n\n3/4 - 1 lb. sweet Italian sausage\n3/4 - 1 pound Velveeta or any processed American cheese\n1 10 oz. can Rotel or other brand diced tomatoes and green chilies\n\nPROCEDURE:\n\nBrown the sausage over low heat, taking care not to make it crisp. Drain it thoroughly. \n\nCut the cheese into half inch cubes. Put the cheese and tomatoes into a bowl and microwave it until the cheese is melted. Stir once or twice so the cheese melts evenly.\n\n Mix the sausage into the cheese and tomato mixture and microwave again until the dip is very warm.\n\nServe warm with tortilla chips or scoops.\n\nNOTES: You can put the dip into a small crockpot to keep it warm, but a half dozen people can finish this dip before it gets cold if you set a good example. You can also pop it back into the microwave for a few seconds if the dip gets too cool.\n\nIf you make the vegetarian version, wash and cut the stem off the pepper, then slice in fourths, remove the seeds and white membrane, and chop the pepper into an eighth inch dice. Add the chopped pepper when you are first melting the cheese, then stir in the diced tomatoes and warm the dish for serving.\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Chuck Rang","author_s":"http://kitchencourage.areavoices.com/author/cbrang/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-19T12:44:18Z","displaydate":"2014-07-19 07:44:18","displaymodified":"2014-07-19 07:44:18","tags":["appetizers","cheese","italian sausage","meat","Velveeta"],"categories":["Appetizers"],"spell":["Italian Sausage and Cheese Dip","I have not fallen in love with Velveeta, but the stuff does have its uses. One is a version of that old favorite, cheese and sausage dip, introduced to Jerri and me by our neighbors, Jill and Lonnie. \n\nThis version was brought north from Oklahoma and uses sweet Italian sausage instead of ordinary breakfast sausage. It is a delicious combination that will please most everyone except your vegetarian friends. You can make a tasty vegetarian version without the sausage but with a finely chopped jalapeño pepper for a little extra flavor. \n\nINGREDIENTS:\n\n3/4 - 1 lb. sweet Italian sausage\n3/4 - 1 pound Velveeta or any processed American cheese\n1 10 oz. can Rotel or other brand diced tomatoes and green chilies\n\nPROCEDURE:\n\nBrown the sausage over low heat, taking care not to make it crisp. Drain it thoroughly. \n\nCut the cheese into half inch cubes. Put the cheese and tomatoes into a bowl and microwave it until the cheese is melted. Stir once or twice so the cheese melts evenly.\n\n Mix the sausage into the cheese and tomato mixture and microwave again until the dip is very warm.\n\nServe warm with tortilla chips or scoops.\n\nNOTES: You can put the dip into a small crockpot to keep it warm, but a half dozen people can finish this dip before it gets cold if you set a good example. You can also pop it back into the microwave for a few seconds if the dip gets too cool.\n\nIf you make the vegetarian version, wash and cut the stem off the pepper, then slice in fourths, remove the seeds and white membrane, and chop the pepper into an eighth inch dice. Add the chopped pepper when you are first melting the cheese, then stir in the diced tomatoes and warm the dish for serving.\n","Chuck Rang"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:goethe.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":1138,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"goethe.areavoices.com/86196","permalink":"http://goethe.areavoices.com/2014/03/30/hicks-arcia-are-keys-to-respectability-for-twins/","blogid":"451","blogdomain":"goethe.areavoices.com","hostname":"goethe.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Hicks, Arcia are keys to respectability for Twins","content":"After three straight seasons with 90-plus losses, the uphill climb that the Minnesota Twins face entering today's season opener has become very steep.\n\nThere is hope for the future, which I touched on in our season preview in today's paper. The Twins farm system is highly ranked by a number of sources, including Baseball America.\n\nBut in terms of 2014, two young players who will play significant roles in Minnesota's fortunes are outfielders Aaron Hicks and Oswaldo Arcia.\n\nHicks and Arcia - who were among those top-ranked prospects entering last season - debuted in 2013, with Hicks struggling mightily and Arcia providing mixed results.\n\nHicks forced his way onto the opening day roster last season with a big spring, but hit only .192 in 81 games. The same spring scenario played out again this year, with Hicks once again the starting - and, like last year, lone - center fielder.\n\nArcia came up midseason and provided some pop with 14 homers in 97 games. But he also struck out 117 times in just 351 at-bats.\n\nJohn Manuel, who is the editor in chief of Baseball America, spoke at length about the team's prospects in today's Forum story. But he also touched on Hicks and Arcia, saying he's much more bullish on Arcia's potential moving forward.\n\n\"I'm pretty excited about Arcia,\" Manuel said earlier this month. \"... I believe he will hit at the big league level. He impacts the baseball with consistency. I'm fairly bullish on him.\"\n\nAs for Hicks, Manuel said: \"Aaron Hicks is a much tougher guy to read. Didn't read some good things about him when he got sent to Triple-A. The buzz around Hicks and how he was handling his struggles and his demotion was not great. ... He had about as bad of year as you can have last year. He had to deal with a lot of failure. And indications were he didn't handle it well. Generally the track record for guys who have a year that bad is not good.\"\n\nWhen looking at this team, I think the Twins - thanks to Glen Perkins, Casey Fien, Jared Burton and company - should have a solid, dependable bullpen. And while Ricky Nolasco and Phil Hughes probably won't produce like the Nos. 1 and 3 starters that they are on the Twins, this is a veteran staff. And I think it's a predictable staff. Not a great staff, but I think we know what to expect.\n\nThe hope is that Nolasco, Hughes, Kevin Correia and Mike Pelfrey can at the very least pitch deep enough into games to keep the top bullpen arms fresh and productive.\n\nThe lineup has the greatest amount of question marks. How much will Josmil Pinto play? Can Trevor Plouffe and Josh Willingham return to their 2012 forms? Who is the leadoff hitter? Who is the No. 2 hitter, for that matter?\n\nBut Hicks and Arcia are the keys. Right now, this feels like a team that will go 68-94. Pitching has been elusive for the Twins in recent years, and now the lineup looks like, even with a good start, that it might struggle to consistently produce enough runs each game to win.","rawcontent":"After three straight seasons with 90-plus losses, the uphill climb that the Minnesota Twins face entering today's season opener has become very steep.\n\nThere is hope for the future, which I touched on in our season preview in today's paper. The Twins farm system is highly ranked by a number of sources, including Baseball America.\n\nBut in terms of 2014, two young players who will play significant roles in Minnesota's fortunes are outfielders Aaron Hicks and Oswaldo Arcia.\n\nHicks and Arcia - who were among those top-ranked prospects entering last season - debuted in 2013, with Hicks struggling mightily and Arcia providing mixed results.\n\nHicks forced his way onto the opening day roster last season with a big spring, but hit only .192 in 81 games. The same spring scenario played out again this year, with Hicks once again the starting - and, like last year, lone - center fielder.\n\nArcia came up midseason and provided some pop with 14 homers in 97 games. But he also struck out 117 times in just 351 at-bats.\n\nJohn Manuel, who is the editor in chief of Baseball America, spoke at length about the team's prospects in today's Forum story. But he also touched on Hicks and Arcia, saying he's much more bullish on Arcia's potential moving forward.\n\n\"I'm pretty excited about Arcia,\" Manuel said earlier this month. \"... I believe he will hit at the big league level. He impacts the baseball with consistency. I'm fairly bullish on him.\"\n\nAs for Hicks, Manuel said: \"Aaron Hicks is a much tougher guy to read. Didn't read some good things about him when he got sent to Triple-A. The buzz around Hicks and how he was handling his struggles and his demotion was not great. ... He had about as bad of year as you can have last year. He had to deal with a lot of failure. And indications were he didn't handle it well. Generally the track record for guys who have a year that bad is not good.\"\n\nWhen looking at this team, I think the Twins - thanks to Glen Perkins, Casey Fien, Jared Burton and company - should have a solid, dependable bullpen. And while Ricky Nolasco and Phil Hughes probably won't produce like the Nos. 1 and 3 starters that they are on the Twins, this is a veteran staff. And I think it's a predictable staff. Not a great staff, but I think we know what to expect.\n\nThe hope is that Nolasco, Hughes, Kevin Correia and Mike Pelfrey can at the very least pitch deep enough into games to keep the top bullpen arms fresh and productive.\n\nThe lineup has the greatest amount of question marks. How much will Josmil Pinto play? Can Trevor Plouffe and Josh Willingham return to their 2012 forms? Who is the leadoff hitter? Who is the No. 2 hitter, for that matter?\n\nBut Hicks and Arcia are the keys. Right now, this feels like a team that will go 68-94. Pitching has been elusive for the Twins in recent years, and now the lineup looks like, even with a good start, that it might struggle to consistently produce enough runs each game to win.","contentnoshortcodes":"After three straight seasons with 90-plus losses, the uphill climb that the Minnesota Twins face entering today's season opener has become very steep.\n\nThere is hope for the future, which I touched on in our season preview in today's paper. The Twins farm system is highly ranked by a number of sources, including Baseball America.\n\nBut in terms of 2014, two young players who will play significant roles in Minnesota's fortunes are outfielders Aaron Hicks and Oswaldo Arcia.\n\nHicks and Arcia - who were among those top-ranked prospects entering last season - debuted in 2013, with Hicks struggling mightily and Arcia providing mixed results.\n\nHicks forced his way onto the opening day roster last season with a big spring, but hit only .192 in 81 games. The same spring scenario played out again this year, with Hicks once again the starting - and, like last year, lone - center fielder.\n\nArcia came up midseason and provided some pop with 14 homers in 97 games. But he also struck out 117 times in just 351 at-bats.\n\nJohn Manuel, who is the editor in chief of Baseball America, spoke at length about the team's prospects in today's Forum story. But he also touched on Hicks and Arcia, saying he's much more bullish on Arcia's potential moving forward.\n\n\"I'm pretty excited about Arcia,\" Manuel said earlier this month. \"... I believe he will hit at the big league level. He impacts the baseball with consistency. I'm fairly bullish on him.\"\n\nAs for Hicks, Manuel said: \"Aaron Hicks is a much tougher guy to read. Didn't read some good things about him when he got sent to Triple-A. The buzz around Hicks and how he was handling his struggles and his demotion was not great. ... He had about as bad of year as you can have last year. He had to deal with a lot of failure. And indications were he didn't handle it well. Generally the track record for guys who have a year that bad is not good.\"\n\nWhen looking at this team, I think the Twins - thanks to Glen Perkins, Casey Fien, Jared Burton and company - should have a solid, dependable bullpen. And while Ricky Nolasco and Phil Hughes probably won't produce like the Nos. 1 and 3 starters that they are on the Twins, this is a veteran staff. And I think it's a predictable staff. Not a great staff, but I think we know what to expect.\n\nThe hope is that Nolasco, Hughes, Kevin Correia and Mike Pelfrey can at the very least pitch deep enough into games to keep the top bullpen arms fresh and productive.\n\nThe lineup has the greatest amount of question marks. How much will Josmil Pinto play? Can Trevor Plouffe and Josh Willingham return to their 2012 forms? Who is the leadoff hitter? Who is the No. 2 hitter, for that matter?\n\nBut Hicks and Arcia are the keys. Right now, this feels like a team that will go 68-94. Pitching has been elusive for the Twins in recent years, and now the lineup looks like, even with a good start, that it might struggle to consistently produce enough runs each game to win.","numcomments":0,"author":"Hayden Goethe","author_s":"http://goethe.areavoices.com/author/goethe/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-03-31T04:50:51Z","displaydate":"2014-03-30 23:50:51","displaymodified":"2014-03-30 23:50:51","tags":["baseball","twins"],"spell":["Hicks, Arcia are keys to respectability for Twins","After three straight seasons with 90-plus losses, the uphill climb that the Minnesota Twins face entering today's season opener has become very steep.\n\nThere is hope for the future, which I touched on in our season preview in today's paper. The Twins farm system is highly ranked by a number of sources, including Baseball America.\n\nBut in terms of 2014, two young players who will play significant roles in Minnesota's fortunes are outfielders Aaron Hicks and Oswaldo Arcia.\n\nHicks and Arcia - who were among those top-ranked prospects entering last season - debuted in 2013, with Hicks struggling mightily and Arcia providing mixed results.\n\nHicks forced his way onto the opening day roster last season with a big spring, but hit only .192 in 81 games. The same spring scenario played out again this year, with Hicks once again the starting - and, like last year, lone - center fielder.\n\nArcia came up midseason and provided some pop with 14 homers in 97 games. But he also struck out 117 times in just 351 at-bats.\n\nJohn Manuel, who is the editor in chief of Baseball America, spoke at length about the team's prospects in today's Forum story. But he also touched on Hicks and Arcia, saying he's much more bullish on Arcia's potential moving forward.\n\n\"I'm pretty excited about Arcia,\" Manuel said earlier this month. \"... I believe he will hit at the big league level. He impacts the baseball with consistency. I'm fairly bullish on him.\"\n\nAs for Hicks, Manuel said: \"Aaron Hicks is a much tougher guy to read. Didn't read some good things about him when he got sent to Triple-A. The buzz around Hicks and how he was handling his struggles and his demotion was not great. ... He had about as bad of year as you can have last year. He had to deal with a lot of failure. And indications were he didn't handle it well. Generally the track record for guys who have a year that bad is not good.\"\n\nWhen looking at this team, I think the Twins - thanks to Glen Perkins, Casey Fien, Jared Burton and company - should have a solid, dependable bullpen. And while Ricky Nolasco and Phil Hughes probably won't produce like the Nos. 1 and 3 starters that they are on the Twins, this is a veteran staff. And I think it's a predictable staff. Not a great staff, but I think we know what to expect.\n\nThe hope is that Nolasco, Hughes, Kevin Correia and Mike Pelfrey can at the very least pitch deep enough into games to keep the top bullpen arms fresh and productive.\n\nThe lineup has the greatest amount of question marks. How much will Josmil Pinto play? Can Trevor Plouffe and Josh Willingham return to their 2012 forms? Who is the leadoff hitter? Who is the No. 2 hitter, for that matter?\n\nBut Hicks and Arcia are the keys. Right now, this feels like a team that will go 68-94. Pitching has been elusive for the Twins in recent years, and now the lineup looks like, even with a good start, that it might struggle to consistently produce enough runs each game to win.","Hayden Goethe"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:walkingtowardthelilytree.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":24,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"walkingtowardthelilytree.areavoices.com/220","permalink":"http://walkingtowardthelilytree.areavoices.com/2012/09/20/erins-attempt-at-hobbies-canning/","blogid":"24010","blogdomain":"walkingtowardthelilytree.areavoices.com","hostname":"walkingtowardthelilytree.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Erin's (attempt at) Hobbies- Canning","content":"Earlier this Summer we decided to join Bluebird Farms and have been thrilled each Tuesday when we get our fresh vegetables. The day I signed us up for Bluebird Farms, I developed a healthy obsession with canning.\n\nCanning is great for me for a couple of reasons; 1. If you know me at all, you know I've got a thing about running out of food. I live in a constant state of fear of running low which has resulted in weekly Sam's club visits, an extra freezer in our kitchen and a closet full of overage. I did not grow up without food, so I'm not too sure where this 'thing' came from, but I've got it. My name is Erin and I'm a borderline food hoarder. 2. I love working with the ingredients and making food for my family that is healthy and that hasn't been doused in pesticides. 3. I really enjoy giving away things I've canned.\n\nHere are a couple of things I made a few weeks back:\n\n\n\nI began by boiling my jars to sterilize them.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is an amazing Blackberry Port Jam I've made twice now. Recipe (as my memory allows) is below.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nSteve loves Apple Butter- so Apple Butter he got. I had to push it through a sieve. My arms were super sore.\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is a picture of the Apple Butter cooking. Has a much richer color after all of the Fall ingredients were added.\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\nI made a Fall Blend of Apple Butter and used Maple Syrup, Cinnamon, Vanilla, Brown Sugar, Cloves, All Spice, and Maple Flavoring along with even more sugar.\n\n \n\nI didn't need to add any pectin to this since I cooked the apples with peels and pressed everything through a sieve.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Blackberry Port Jam\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Apple Butter.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nBlackberry Port Jam:\n\n5-6 Cups Whole Blackberries\n\n1 Cup of a good, fruity Port\n\n1 tsp. ground cloves\n\n1 tsp. cinnamon\n\n6 Cups sugar\n\n1 Packet of Pectin (I used the low sugar one)\n\nCook Blackberries in pot until they turn bright red and get nice and soft. (about a half hour to 45 minutes). Mash them with a potato masher to get the juices out and to break them up a bit. Add in your sugar, port, cloves (to taste... I like a bit more than Steve does) and cinnamon and cook for about another hour to combine all of the flavors and to make sure things have reduced down nicely. Add in your pectin packet and stir until dissolved.\n\nPour into pint jars leaving about 1/2 inch below the top. Seal and place in a hot water bath canner for about 10 minutes. Remove and cool on a dry towel listening for the pops. All of my jars popped pretty quickly.\n\nSteve and I have really enjoyed this jam on toast as well as with pork chops. Steve reduces some of it down with some rosemary and other things and it's just great with a pork chop and some roasted veggies.\n\nApple Butter:\n\n1 5lb. Bag of green apples\n\n1 container of sugar-free applesauce\n\nGood quality maple syrup (I used about a cup or two)\n\nCinnamon\n\nVanilla\n\nSugar- about one cup for each cup of Apples\n\nNutmeg\n\nBrown Sugar\n\nI wish I had a good description of how I made this.  Really, I just used an apple butter recipe from online- then added in whatever I thought would be tasty. I pretty much just dumped in ingredients and kept tasting it until it was sweet and tasted like Fall.\n\nIt was a hit!\n\nI hot-water-bathed the apple butter for around 10 minutes, as well.\n\nRead more about our family Here.\n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"Earlier this Summer we decided to join Bluebird Farms and have been thrilled each Tuesday when we get our fresh vegetables. The day I signed us up for Bluebird Farms, I developed a healthy obsession with canning.\n\nCanning is great for me for a couple of reasons; 1. If you know me at all, you know I've got a thing about running out of food. I live in a constant state of fear of running low which has resulted in weekly Sam's club visits, an extra freezer in our kitchen and a closet full of overage. I did not grow up without food, so I'm not too sure where this 'thing' came from, but I've got it. My name is Erin and I'm a borderline food hoarder. 2. I love working with the ingredients and making food for my family that is healthy and that hasn't been doused in pesticides. 3. I really enjoy giving away things I've canned.\n\nHere are a couple of things I made a few weeks back:\n\n\n\nI began by boiling my jars to sterilize them.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is an amazing Blackberry Port Jam I've made twice now. Recipe (as my memory allows) is below.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nSteve loves Apple Butter- so Apple Butter he got. I had to push it through a sieve. My arms were super sore.\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is a picture of the Apple Butter cooking. Has a much richer color after all of the Fall ingredients were added.\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\nI made a Fall Blend of Apple Butter and used Maple Syrup, Cinnamon, Vanilla, Brown Sugar, Cloves, All Spice, and Maple Flavoring along with even more sugar.\n\n \n\nI didn't need to add any pectin to this since I cooked the apples with peels and pressed everything through a sieve.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Blackberry Port Jam\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Apple Butter.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nBlackberry Port Jam:\n\n5-6 Cups Whole Blackberries\n\n1 Cup of a good, fruity Port\n\n1 tsp. ground cloves\n\n1 tsp. cinnamon\n\n6 Cups sugar\n\n1 Packet of Pectin (I used the low sugar one)\n\nCook Blackberries in pot until they turn bright red and get nice and soft. (about a half hour to 45 minutes). Mash them with a potato masher to get the juices out and to break them up a bit. Add in your sugar, port, cloves (to taste... I like a bit more than Steve does) and cinnamon and cook for about another hour to combine all of the flavors and to make sure things have reduced down nicely. Add in your pectin packet and stir until dissolved.\n\nPour into pint jars leaving about 1/2 inch below the top. Seal and place in a hot water bath canner for about 10 minutes. Remove and cool on a dry towel listening for the pops. All of my jars popped pretty quickly.\n\nSteve and I have really enjoyed this jam on toast as well as with pork chops. Steve reduces some of it down with some rosemary and other things and it's just great with a pork chop and some roasted veggies.\n\nApple Butter:\n\n1 5lb. Bag of green apples\n\n1 container of sugar-free applesauce\n\nGood quality maple syrup (I used about a cup or two)\n\nCinnamon\n\nVanilla\n\nSugar- about one cup for each cup of Apples\n\nNutmeg\n\nBrown Sugar\n\nI wish I had a good description of how I made this. Really, I just used an apple butter recipe from online- then added in whatever I thought would be tasty. I pretty much just dumped in ingredients and kept tasting it until it was sweet and tasted like Fall.\n\nIt was a hit!\n\nI hot-water-bathed the apple butter for around 10 minutes, as well.\n\nRead more about our family Here.\n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"Earlier this Summer we decided to join Bluebird Farms and have been thrilled each Tuesday when we get our fresh vegetables. The day I signed us up for Bluebird Farms, I developed a healthy obsession with canning.\n\nCanning is great for me for a couple of reasons; 1. If you know me at all, you know I've got a thing about running out of food. I live in a constant state of fear of running low which has resulted in weekly Sam's club visits, an extra freezer in our kitchen and a closet full of overage. I did not grow up without food, so I'm not too sure where this 'thing' came from, but I've got it. My name is Erin and I'm a borderline food hoarder. 2. I love working with the ingredients and making food for my family that is healthy and that hasn't been doused in pesticides. 3. I really enjoy giving away things I've canned.\n\nHere are a couple of things I made a few weeks back:\n\n\n\nI began by boiling my jars to sterilize them.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is an amazing Blackberry Port Jam I've made twice now. Recipe (as my memory allows) is below.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nSteve loves Apple Butter- so Apple Butter he got. I had to push it through a sieve. My arms were super sore.\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is a picture of the Apple Butter cooking. Has a much richer color after all of the Fall ingredients were added.\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\nI made a Fall Blend of Apple Butter and used Maple Syrup, Cinnamon, Vanilla, Brown Sugar, Cloves, All Spice, and Maple Flavoring along with even more sugar.\n\n \n\nI didn't need to add any pectin to this since I cooked the apples with peels and pressed everything through a sieve.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Blackberry Port Jam\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Apple Butter.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nBlackberry Port Jam:\n\n5-6 Cups Whole Blackberries\n\n1 Cup of a good, fruity Port\n\n1 tsp. ground cloves\n\n1 tsp. cinnamon\n\n6 Cups sugar\n\n1 Packet of Pectin (I used the low sugar one)\n\nCook Blackberries in pot until they turn bright red and get nice and soft. (about a half hour to 45 minutes). Mash them with a potato masher to get the juices out and to break them up a bit. Add in your sugar, port, cloves (to taste... I like a bit more than Steve does) and cinnamon and cook for about another hour to combine all of the flavors and to make sure things have reduced down nicely. Add in your pectin packet and stir until dissolved.\n\nPour into pint jars leaving about 1/2 inch below the top. Seal and place in a hot water bath canner for about 10 minutes. Remove and cool on a dry towel listening for the pops. All of my jars popped pretty quickly.\n\nSteve and I have really enjoyed this jam on toast as well as with pork chops. Steve reduces some of it down with some rosemary and other things and it's just great with a pork chop and some roasted veggies.\n\nApple Butter:\n\n1 5lb. Bag of green apples\n\n1 container of sugar-free applesauce\n\nGood quality maple syrup (I used about a cup or two)\n\nCinnamon\n\nVanilla\n\nSugar- about one cup for each cup of Apples\n\nNutmeg\n\nBrown Sugar\n\nI wish I had a good description of how I made this. Really, I just used an apple butter recipe from online- then added in whatever I thought would be tasty. I pretty much just dumped in ingredients and kept tasting it until it was sweet and tasted like Fall.\n\nIt was a hit!\n\nI hot-water-bathed the apple butter for around 10 minutes, as well.\n\nRead more about our family Here.\n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Erin Mayer","author_s":"http://walkingtowardthelilytree.areavoices.com/author/ourlilytree/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-09-20T21:10:32Z","displaydate":"2012-09-20 21:10:32","displaymodified":"2012-09-20 21:10:53","tags":["entertainment","family","food"],"categories":["Erin's (attempt at) Hobbies."],"spell":["Erin's (attempt at) Hobbies- Canning","Earlier this Summer we decided to join Bluebird Farms and have been thrilled each Tuesday when we get our fresh vegetables. The day I signed us up for Bluebird Farms, I developed a healthy obsession with canning.\n\nCanning is great for me for a couple of reasons; 1. If you know me at all, you know I've got a thing about running out of food. I live in a constant state of fear of running low which has resulted in weekly Sam's club visits, an extra freezer in our kitchen and a closet full of overage. I did not grow up without food, so I'm not too sure where this 'thing' came from, but I've got it. My name is Erin and I'm a borderline food hoarder. 2. I love working with the ingredients and making food for my family that is healthy and that hasn't been doused in pesticides. 3. I really enjoy giving away things I've canned.\n\nHere are a couple of things I made a few weeks back:\n\n\n\nI began by boiling my jars to sterilize them.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is an amazing Blackberry Port Jam I've made twice now. Recipe (as my memory allows) is below.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nSteve loves Apple Butter- so Apple Butter he got. I had to push it through a sieve. My arms were super sore.\n\n\n\n \n\n \n\n\n\n\n\n\nThis is a picture of the Apple Butter cooking. Has a much richer color after all of the Fall ingredients were added.\n\n\n\n \n\n\n\nI made a Fall Blend of Apple Butter and used Maple Syrup, Cinnamon, Vanilla, Brown Sugar, Cloves, All Spice, and Maple Flavoring along with even more sugar.\n\n \n\nI didn't need to add any pectin to this since I cooked the apples with peels and pressed everything through a sieve.\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Blackberry Port Jam\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nFinished Apple Butter.\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nBlackberry Port Jam:\n\n5-6 Cups Whole Blackberries\n\n1 Cup of a good, fruity Port\n\n1 tsp. ground cloves\n\n1 tsp. cinnamon\n\n6 Cups sugar\n\n1 Packet of Pectin (I used the low sugar one)\n\nCook Blackberries in pot until they turn bright red and get nice and soft. (about a half hour to 45 minutes). Mash them with a potato masher to get the juices out and to break them up a bit. Add in your sugar, port, cloves (to taste... I like a bit more than Steve does) and cinnamon and cook for about another hour to combine all of the flavors and to make sure things have reduced down nicely. Add in your pectin packet and stir until dissolved.\n\nPour into pint jars leaving about 1/2 inch below the top. Seal and place in a hot water bath canner for about 10 minutes. Remove and cool on a dry towel listening for the pops. All of my jars popped pretty quickly.\n\nSteve and I have really enjoyed this jam on toast as well as with pork chops. Steve reduces some of it down with some rosemary and other things and it's just great with a pork chop and some roasted veggies.\n\nApple Butter:\n\n1 5lb. Bag of green apples\n\n1 container of sugar-free applesauce\n\nGood quality maple syrup (I used about a cup or two)\n\nCinnamon\n\nVanilla\n\nSugar- about one cup for each cup of Apples\n\nNutmeg\n\nBrown Sugar\n\nI wish I had a good description of how I made this.  Really, I just used an apple butter recipe from online- then added in whatever I thought would be tasty. I pretty much just dumped in ingredients and kept tasting it until it was sweet and tasted like Fall.\n\nIt was a hit!\n\nI hot-water-bathed the apple butter for around 10 minutes, as well.\n\nRead more about our family Here.\n\n \n\n ","Erin Mayer"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:healingtouch.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:repdeanurdahl.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":9,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"repdeanurdahl.areavoices.com/51","permalink":"http://repdeanurdahl.areavoices.com/2013/02/08/reflecting-on-state-of-the-state-address/","blogid":"26284","blogdomain":"repdeanurdahl.areavoices.com","hostname":"repdeanurdahl.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Reflecting on State of the State Address","content":"Small-business owners, who would undoubtedly suffer from Gov. Mark Dayton’s proposed tax increases, were in the House chamber as the governor recently delivered his State of the State Address.\n\nI was pleased to be joined in the House by special guests John and Dee Forbes, who own Heartthrob Exhaust, Inc., of Litchfield. One component in Dayton’s plan to increase taxes by $3.7 billion includes a business-to-business tax. State officials estimate the governor’s proposed taxes would cost our businesses $1.5 billion in 2015 alone.\n\nThis would damage companies like the Forbes’ and put our state at a further disadvantage in the competitive marketplace. The same day Dayton delivered his speech, a prominent headline on Page 1 of the Pioneer Press read: “Dayton tax plan has a fan – in Wisconsin.” The article indicated a Wisconsin lawmaker sent a letter to Minnesota business owners, urging them to relocate across the border.\n\nConcern from small-business owners all across the state was voiced during a roundtable discussion prior to Dayton’s speech. It was a group of mainly everyday people trying to make a successful living, not exactly the picture Dayton painted in our minds when he focused on making the “rich” pay more in taxes.\n\nDayton has moved from his “tax the rich” campaign rhetoric to a tax-everyone plan.\n\nWith Democrats controlling the House and the Senate, our new state budget could include many of the tax increases the governor is proposing. People championing tax increases continue to say middle-class Minnesotans would not pay more under the governor’s plan. That is simply wrong. We cannot raise state taxes and spending to record levels and expect the “rich” will be the only ones impacted.\n\nIt was interesting how, in his State of the State speech, the governor acknowledged policies championed by Republican majorities the last two years are delivering positive results for Minnesota. We have 72,000 mo\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_52\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"207\"] John and Dee Forbes join me as special guests on the House floor for Wednesday's State of the State Address by Gov. Mark Dayton.[/caption]\n\nre jobs, we dramatically improved our state’s bottom line and paid back the entire K-12 funding shift from 2011.\n\nOur state’s economy is growing at 3 percent, yet the governor proposes raising taxes by billions to fund state spending growth of 7.6 percent. This would threaten to undo much of the progress he noted in his speech. Making middle-class citizens – and even the poorest Minnesotans – pay more taxes to feed government’s never-ending appetite for spending is the wrong approach.\n\nThe positive in all this is at least Dayton is offering ideas – even if many are misguided – that will get budget discussions moving.","rawcontent":"Small-business owners, who would undoubtedly suffer from Gov. Mark Daytons proposed tax increases, were in the House chamber as the governor recently delivered his State of the State Address.\n\nI was pleased to be joined in the House by special guests John and Dee Forbes, who own Heartthrob Exhaust, Inc., of Litchfield. One component in Daytons plan to increase taxes by $3.7 billion includes a business-to-business tax. State officials estimate the governors proposed taxes would cost our businesses $1.5 billion in 2015 alone.\n\nThis would damage companies like the Forbes and put our state at a further disadvantage in the competitive marketplace. The same day Dayton delivered his speech, a prominent headline on Page 1 of the Pioneer Press read: Dayton tax plan has a fan in Wisconsin. The article indicated a Wisconsin lawmaker sent a letter to Minnesota business owners, urging them to relocate across the border.\n\nConcern from small-business owners all across the state was voiced during a roundtable discussion prior to Daytons speech. It was a group of mainly everyday people trying to make a successful living, not exactly the picture Dayton painted in our minds when he focused on making the rich pay more in taxes.\n\nDayton has moved from his tax the rich campaign rhetoric to a tax-everyone plan.\n\nWith Democrats controlling the House and the Senate, our new state budget could include many of the tax increases the governor is proposing. People championing tax increases continue to say middle-class Minnesotans would not pay more under the governors plan. That is simply wrong. We cannot raise state taxes and spending to record levels and expect the rich will be the only ones impacted.\n\nIt was interesting how, in his State of the State speech, the governor acknowledged policies championed by Republican majorities the last two years are delivering positive results for Minnesota. We have 72,000 mo\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_52\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"207\"] John and Dee Forbes join me as special guests on the House floor for Wednesday's State of the State Address by Gov. Mark Dayton.[/caption]\n\nre jobs, we dramatically improved our states bottom line and paid back the entire K-12 funding shift from 2011.\n\nOur states economy is growing at 3 percent, yet the governor proposes raising taxes by billions to fund state spending growth of 7.6 percent. This would threaten to undo much of the progress he noted in his speech. Making middle-class citizens and even the poorest Minnesotans pay more taxes to feed governments never-ending appetite for spending is the wrong approach.\n\nThe positive in all this is at least Dayton is offering ideas even if many are misguided that will get budget discussions moving.","contentnoshortcodes":"Small-business owners, who would undoubtedly suffer from Gov. Mark Daytons proposed tax increases, were in the House chamber as the governor recently delivered his State of the State Address.\n\nI was pleased to be joined in the House by special guests John and Dee Forbes, who own Heartthrob Exhaust, Inc., of Litchfield. One component in Daytons plan to increase taxes by $3.7 billion includes a business-to-business tax. State officials estimate the governors proposed taxes would cost our businesses $1.5 billion in 2015 alone.\n\nThis would damage companies like the Forbes and put our state at a further disadvantage in the competitive marketplace. The same day Dayton delivered his speech, a prominent headline on Page 1 of the Pioneer Press read: Dayton tax plan has a fan in Wisconsin. The article indicated a Wisconsin lawmaker sent a letter to Minnesota business owners, urging them to relocate across the border.\n\nConcern from small-business owners all across the state was voiced during a roundtable discussion prior to Daytons speech. It was a group of mainly everyday people trying to make a successful living, not exactly the picture Dayton painted in our minds when he focused on making the rich pay more in taxes.\n\nDayton has moved from his tax the rich campaign rhetoric to a tax-everyone plan.\n\nWith Democrats controlling the House and the Senate, our new state budget could include many of the tax increases the governor is proposing. People championing tax increases continue to say middle-class Minnesotans would not pay more under the governors plan. That is simply wrong. We cannot raise state taxes and spending to record levels and expect the rich will be the only ones impacted.\n\nIt was interesting how, in his State of the State speech, the governor acknowledged policies championed by Republican majorities the last two years are delivering positive results for Minnesota. We have 72,000 mo\n\n\n\nre jobs, we dramatically improved our states bottom line and paid back the entire K-12 funding shift from 2011.\n\nOur states economy is growing at 3 percent, yet the governor proposes raising taxes by billions to fund state spending growth of 7.6 percent. This would threaten to undo much of the progress he noted in his speech. Making middle-class citizens and even the poorest Minnesotans pay more taxes to feed governments never-ending appetite for spending is the wrong approach.\n\nThe positive in all this is at least Dayton is offering ideas even if many are misguided that will get budget discussions moving.","numcomments":0,"author":"Chad Urdahl","author_s":"http://repdeanurdahl.areavoices.com/author/repdeanurdahl/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-02-08T21:31:06Z","displaydate":"2013-02-08 21:31:06","displaymodified":"2013-02-08 21:31:06","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Reflecting on State of the State Address","Small-business owners, who would undoubtedly suffer from Gov. Mark Dayton’s proposed tax increases, were in the House chamber as the governor recently delivered his State of the State Address.\n\nI was pleased to be joined in the House by special guests John and Dee Forbes, who own Heartthrob Exhaust, Inc., of Litchfield. One component in Dayton’s plan to increase taxes by $3.7 billion includes a business-to-business tax. State officials estimate the governor’s proposed taxes would cost our businesses $1.5 billion in 2015 alone.\n\nThis would damage companies like the Forbes’ and put our state at a further disadvantage in the competitive marketplace. The same day Dayton delivered his speech, a prominent headline on Page 1 of the Pioneer Press read: “Dayton tax plan has a fan – in Wisconsin.” The article indicated a Wisconsin lawmaker sent a letter to Minnesota business owners, urging them to relocate across the border.\n\nConcern from small-business owners all across the state was voiced during a roundtable discussion prior to Dayton’s speech. It was a group of mainly everyday people trying to make a successful living, not exactly the picture Dayton painted in our minds when he focused on making the “rich” pay more in taxes.\n\nDayton has moved from his “tax the rich” campaign rhetoric to a tax-everyone plan.\n\nWith Democrats controlling the House and the Senate, our new state budget could include many of the tax increases the governor is proposing. People championing tax increases continue to say middle-class Minnesotans would not pay more under the governor’s plan. That is simply wrong. We cannot raise state taxes and spending to record levels and expect the “rich” will be the only ones impacted.\n\nIt was interesting how, in his State of the State speech, the governor acknowledged policies championed by Republican majorities the last two years are delivering positive results for Minnesota. We have 72,000 mo\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_52\" align=\"alignright\" width=\"207\"] John and Dee Forbes join me as special guests on the House floor for Wednesday's State of the State Address by Gov. Mark Dayton.[/caption]\n\nre jobs, we dramatically improved our state’s bottom line and paid back the entire K-12 funding shift from 2011.\n\nOur state’s economy is growing at 3 percent, yet the governor proposes raising taxes by billions to fund state spending growth of 7.6 percent. This would threaten to undo much of the progress he noted in his speech. Making middle-class citizens – and even the poorest Minnesotans – pay more taxes to feed government’s never-ending appetite for spending is the wrong approach.\n\nThe positive in all this is at least Dayton is offering ideas – even if many are misguided – that will get budget discussions moving.","Chad Urdahl"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:lens.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":28,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"lens.areavoices.com/391","permalink":"http://lens.areavoices.com/2013/10/29/light/","blogid":"25828","blogdomain":"lens.areavoices.com","hostname":"lens.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Light...","content":"\n\n\"Light is Everything\"\n\nIts hard to nail down just one photographer to give credit to these words because as photographers we can all say it! Without light, there is no picture. This post I have asked some of my peers to share a photo of theirs and then write a paragraph explaining why they lit the subject like they did.\n\nYou hear it said all the time that \"you have the eye for it\" when talking about a good photographer. These photographers do have the eye but they also have the skill to fine tune their talents and create images that are on higher levels than most.\n\nQuick introduction of my guests! (Links to their work will be posted at the end of this article)\n\nShane Mercer / I use this term loosely with Shane but compared to the others writing here... he is the new guy. He has been shooting for a bit and his willingness to learn is amazing and his work continues to get better and better and you will see by his paragraph that there is much more than just the eye.\n\nNodakPhoto / Dan is one of my favorite photographers in the area. His lighting techniques are spot on and he really captures beauty in all of his images.\n\nStevie Rae Photography / Also one of my most favorite photographers. Her work differs from the others here. Her technique of lighting the subject is unmatched.\n\n \n\nSo here it is... the first installment of 1|One\n\nShane Mercer\n\n\n\n\"When we consider the grand magnitude of the universe, we tend to think upward, that is, how large and vast it is. But the created order is also grand in the the opposite direction. We may wonder at the massive size and number of stars and planets, but the vastly minute world of cells, atoms, and molecules is also mind-boggling. It is its own tiny infinity. While this image only scratches the surface of that world, it does point to the vast detail, structure and order of that minute-iverse. The strong backlighting of this leaf highlights the massive highway of vessels that nourish it. The hard blacks and greys against the relatively brightly-lit veins serve as a dramatic soundtrack for reflection on the grandness of the created order. I do not mean to say I was thinking of this when I took the photo. Rather, it is what I think of now as I reflect upon it.\" – J. Shane Mercer\n\n \n\nNodakPhoto\n\n\n\n\"I wanted to grab a fun, cute outdoors shot, but we were pressed for time. It was all of 44 degrees, and I wanted to capture the pond in the background. I saw this low hanging branch from the pine tree (upper right), and said that’s it! I placed her just at the edge of the shade cast from the tree as to provide a little bit of rim light on her left arm, shoulder and hair. Then using a Cheetah CL360 with mini octobox at about 1/16 power I illuminated her, and the low hanging pine tree branch to tie her into the depth of field I had created. This was shot at 1/125, f2.8, ISO200 with a Canon 5d MKII, Canon 70-200 f2.8L ver 2, and Cheetah CL360 (placed slightly camera left at about eye level).\" -Dan\n\n \n\nStevie Rae Photography\n\n\n\n\"It was quite the adventure. We were fairies in a magical garden filled with enchanted peaches. She twirled and laughed and took my breath away because the magic was real. It's her. The connections created and the friendships forged are high on my list of favorite things about my job. Number one is exploring with the little ones. They are filled with such wonder and imagination. I am at my least technical when I photograph children. I do not pose them. I do not use any type of flash. I find reflectors to be incredibly distracting. I focus every ounce of my attention on creating an experience for the child. They have this amazing ability to find immense happiness in the smallest of things. If you let them, they will show you the magic this world holds and the incredible meaning of a single moment.\" -Stevie\n\n \n\nmJoy Photography\n\n\n\nThis bride and groom did not want the traditional wedding image. Took them to an abandoned warehouse where the only natural light is from this door from the front that is playing a very small part in this image. I knew I wanted to make this image passionate and make it look as though they are completely alone in this location. These two were amazing and pulled it off. The backlighting/rim lighting technique where I put a speed light behind them provided me with the light I wanted. I wanted to create a shadow in the front to make the image more secretive but let that light peek around just a bit so the viewer can barely see and feel the passion that is being portrayed in this image. -Mitch\n\n \n\nImportant links:\n\nShane Mercer's Blog\n\nNodakPhoto - Facebook page, please hit that like button!\n\nStevie Rae Photography - Facebook page, please hit that like button! Website click here\n\nmJoy Photography - Facebook page, please hit that like button!  Website click here","rawcontent":"\n\n\"Light is Everything\"\n\nIts hard to nail down just one photographer to give credit to these words because as photographers we can all say it! Without light, there is no picture. This post I have asked some of my peers to share a photo of theirs and then write a paragraph explaining why they lit the subject like they did.\n\nYou hear it said all the time that \"you have the eye for it\" when talking about a good photographer. These photographers do have the eye but they also have the skill to fine tune their talents and create images that are on higher levels than most.\n\nQuick introduction of my guests! (Links to their work will be posted at the end of this article)\n\nShane Mercer / I use this term loosely with Shane but compared to the others writing here... he is the new guy. He has been shooting for a bit and his willingness to learn is amazing and his work continues to get better and better and you will see by his paragraph that there is much more than just the eye.\n\nNodakPhoto / Dan is one of my favorite photographers in the area. His lighting techniques are spot on and he really captures beauty in all of his images.\n\nStevie Rae Photography / Also one of my most favorite photographers. Her work differs from the others here. Her technique of lighting the subject is unmatched.\n\n \n\nSo here it is... the first installment of 1|One\n\nShane Mercer\n\n\n\n\"When we consider the grand magnitude of the universe, we tend to think upward, that is, how large and vast it is. But the created order is also grand in the the opposite direction. We may wonder at the massive size and number of stars and planets, but the vastly minute world of cells, atoms, and molecules is also mind-boggling. It is its own tiny infinity. While this image only scratches the surface of that world, it does point to the vast detail, structure and order of that minute-iverse. The strong backlighting of this leaf highlights the massive highway of vessels that nourish it. The hard blacks and greys against the relatively brightly-lit veins serve as a dramatic soundtrack for reflection on the grandness of the created order. I do not mean to say I was thinking of this when I took the photo. Rather, it is what I think of now as I reflect upon it.\" J. Shane Mercer\n\n \n\nNodakPhoto\n\n\n\n\"I wanted to grab a fun, cute outdoors shot, but we were pressed for time. It was all of 44 degrees, and I wanted to capture the pond in the background. I saw this low hanging branch from the pine tree (upper right), and said thats it! I placed her just at the edge of the shade cast from the tree as to provide a little bit of rim light on her left arm, shoulder and hair. Then using a Cheetah CL360 with mini octobox at about 1/16 power I illuminated her, and the low hanging pine tree branch to tie her into the depth of field I had created. This was shot at 1/125, f2.8, ISO200 with a Canon 5d MKII, Canon 70-200 f2.8L ver 2, and Cheetah CL360 (placed slightly camera left at about eye level).\" -Dan\n\n \n\nStevie Rae Photography\n\n\n\n\"It was quite the adventure. We were fairies in a magical garden filled with enchanted peaches. She twirled and laughed and took my breath away because the magic was real. It's her. The connections created and the friendships forged are high on my list of favorite things about my job. Number one is exploring with the little ones. They are filled with such wonder and imagination. I am at my least technical when I photograph children. I do not pose them. I do not use any type of flash. I find reflectors to be incredibly distracting. I focus every ounce of my attention on creating an experience for the child. They have this amazing ability to find immense happiness in the smallest of things. If you let them, they will show you the magic this world holds and the incredible meaning of a single moment.\" -Stevie\n\n \n\nmJoy Photography\n\n\n\nThis bride and groom did not want the traditional wedding image. Took them to an abandoned warehouse where the only natural light is from this door from the front that is playing a very small part in this image. I knew I wanted to make this image passionate and make it look as though they are completely alone in this location. These two were amazing and pulled it off. The backlighting/rim lighting technique where I put a speed light behind them provided me with the light I wanted. I wanted to create a shadow in the front to make the image more secretive but let that light peek around just a bit so the viewer can barely see and feel the passion that is being portrayed in this image. -Mitch\n\n \n\nImportant links:\n\nShane Mercer's Blog\n\nNodakPhoto- Facebook page, please hit that like button!\n\nStevie Rae Photography- Facebook page, please hit that like button! Website click here\n\nmJoy Photography- Facebook page, please hit that like button! Website click here","contentnoshortcodes":"\n\n\"Light is Everything\"\n\nIts hard to nail down just one photographer to give credit to these words because as photographers we can all say it! Without light, there is no picture. This post I have asked some of my peers to share a photo of theirs and then write a paragraph explaining why they lit the subject like they did.\n\nYou hear it said all the time that \"you have the eye for it\" when talking about a good photographer. These photographers do have the eye but they also have the skill to fine tune their talents and create images that are on higher levels than most.\n\nQuick introduction of my guests! (Links to their work will be posted at the end of this article)\n\nShane Mercer / I use this term loosely with Shane but compared to the others writing here... he is the new guy. He has been shooting for a bit and his willingness to learn is amazing and his work continues to get better and better and you will see by his paragraph that there is much more than just the eye.\n\nNodakPhoto / Dan is one of my favorite photographers in the area. His lighting techniques are spot on and he really captures beauty in all of his images.\n\nStevie Rae Photography / Also one of my most favorite photographers. Her work differs from the others here. Her technique of lighting the subject is unmatched.\n\n \n\nSo here it is... the first installment of 1|One\n\nShane Mercer\n\n\n\n\"When we consider the grand magnitude of the universe, we tend to think upward, that is, how large and vast it is. But the created order is also grand in the the opposite direction. We may wonder at the massive size and number of stars and planets, but the vastly minute world of cells, atoms, and molecules is also mind-boggling. It is its own tiny infinity. While this image only scratches the surface of that world, it does point to the vast detail, structure and order of that minute-iverse. The strong backlighting of this leaf highlights the massive highway of vessels that nourish it. The hard blacks and greys against the relatively brightly-lit veins serve as a dramatic soundtrack for reflection on the grandness of the created order. I do not mean to say I was thinking of this when I took the photo. Rather, it is what I think of now as I reflect upon it.\" J. Shane Mercer\n\n \n\nNodakPhoto\n\n\n\n\"I wanted to grab a fun, cute outdoors shot, but we were pressed for time. It was all of 44 degrees, and I wanted to capture the pond in the background. I saw this low hanging branch from the pine tree (upper right), and said thats it! I placed her just at the edge of the shade cast from the tree as to provide a little bit of rim light on her left arm, shoulder and hair. Then using a Cheetah CL360 with mini octobox at about 1/16 power I illuminated her, and the low hanging pine tree branch to tie her into the depth of field I had created. This was shot at 1/125, f2.8, ISO200 with a Canon 5d MKII, Canon 70-200 f2.8L ver 2, and Cheetah CL360 (placed slightly camera left at about eye level).\" -Dan\n\n \n\nStevie Rae Photography\n\n\n\n\"It was quite the adventure. We were fairies in a magical garden filled with enchanted peaches. She twirled and laughed and took my breath away because the magic was real. It's her. The connections created and the friendships forged are high on my list of favorite things about my job. Number one is exploring with the little ones. They are filled with such wonder and imagination. I am at my least technical when I photograph children. I do not pose them. I do not use any type of flash. I find reflectors to be incredibly distracting. I focus every ounce of my attention on creating an experience for the child. They have this amazing ability to find immense happiness in the smallest of things. If you let them, they will show you the magic this world holds and the incredible meaning of a single moment.\" -Stevie\n\n \n\nmJoy Photography\n\n\n\nThis bride and groom did not want the traditional wedding image. Took them to an abandoned warehouse where the only natural light is from this door from the front that is playing a very small part in this image. I knew I wanted to make this image passionate and make it look as though they are completely alone in this location. These two were amazing and pulled it off. The backlighting/rim lighting technique where I put a speed light behind them provided me with the light I wanted. I wanted to create a shadow in the front to make the image more secretive but let that light peek around just a bit so the viewer can barely see and feel the passion that is being portrayed in this image. -Mitch\n\n \n\nImportant links:\n\nShane Mercer's Blog\n\nNodakPhoto- Facebook page, please hit that like button!\n\nStevie Rae Photography- Facebook page, please hit that like button! Website click here\n\nmJoy Photography- Facebook page, please hit that like button! Website click here","numcomments":0,"author":"mJoyPhoto","author_s":"http://lens.areavoices.com/author/mhighman/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-10-29T14:34:58Z","displaydate":"2013-10-29 09:34:58","displaymodified":"2013-10-29 10:20:02","tags":["Canon","Light","Minnesota","mjoyphotography","Models","Nikon","NoDakPhoto","North Dakota","reflectors","Shane Mercer","speedlights","Stevie Rae Photography","Strobes","Studio"],"categories":["Portraits","Tips"],"spell":["Light...","\n\n\"Light is Everything\"\n\nIts hard to nail down just one photographer to give credit to these words because as photographers we can all say it! Without light, there is no picture. This post I have asked some of my peers to share a photo of theirs and then write a paragraph explaining why they lit the subject like they did.\n\nYou hear it said all the time that \"you have the eye for it\" when talking about a good photographer. These photographers do have the eye but they also have the skill to fine tune their talents and create images that are on higher levels than most.\n\nQuick introduction of my guests! (Links to their work will be posted at the end of this article)\n\nShane Mercer / I use this term loosely with Shane but compared to the others writing here... he is the new guy. He has been shooting for a bit and his willingness to learn is amazing and his work continues to get better and better and you will see by his paragraph that there is much more than just the eye.\n\nNodakPhoto / Dan is one of my favorite photographers in the area. His lighting techniques are spot on and he really captures beauty in all of his images.\n\nStevie Rae Photography / Also one of my most favorite photographers. Her work differs from the others here. Her technique of lighting the subject is unmatched.\n\n \n\nSo here it is... the first installment of 1|One\n\nShane Mercer\n\n\n\n\"When we consider the grand magnitude of the universe, we tend to think upward, that is, how large and vast it is. But the created order is also grand in the the opposite direction. We may wonder at the massive size and number of stars and planets, but the vastly minute world of cells, atoms, and molecules is also mind-boggling. It is its own tiny infinity. While this image only scratches the surface of that world, it does point to the vast detail, structure and order of that minute-iverse. The strong backlighting of this leaf highlights the massive highway of vessels that nourish it. The hard blacks and greys against the relatively brightly-lit veins serve as a dramatic soundtrack for reflection on the grandness of the created order. I do not mean to say I was thinking of this when I took the photo. Rather, it is what I think of now as I reflect upon it.\" – J. Shane Mercer\n\n \n\nNodakPhoto\n\n\n\n\"I wanted to grab a fun, cute outdoors shot, but we were pressed for time. It was all of 44 degrees, and I wanted to capture the pond in the background. I saw this low hanging branch from the pine tree (upper right), and said that’s it! I placed her just at the edge of the shade cast from the tree as to provide a little bit of rim light on her left arm, shoulder and hair. Then using a Cheetah CL360 with mini octobox at about 1/16 power I illuminated her, and the low hanging pine tree branch to tie her into the depth of field I had created. This was shot at 1/125, f2.8, ISO200 with a Canon 5d MKII, Canon 70-200 f2.8L ver 2, and Cheetah CL360 (placed slightly camera left at about eye level).\" -Dan\n\n \n\nStevie Rae Photography\n\n\n\n\"It was quite the adventure. We were fairies in a magical garden filled with enchanted peaches. She twirled and laughed and took my breath away because the magic was real. It's her. The connections created and the friendships forged are high on my list of favorite things about my job. Number one is exploring with the little ones. They are filled with such wonder and imagination. I am at my least technical when I photograph children. I do not pose them. I do not use any type of flash. I find reflectors to be incredibly distracting. I focus every ounce of my attention on creating an experience for the child. They have this amazing ability to find immense happiness in the smallest of things. If you let them, they will show you the magic this world holds and the incredible meaning of a single moment.\" -Stevie\n\n \n\nmJoy Photography\n\n\n\nThis bride and groom did not want the traditional wedding image. Took them to an abandoned warehouse where the only natural light is from this door from the front that is playing a very small part in this image. I knew I wanted to make this image passionate and make it look as though they are completely alone in this location. These two were amazing and pulled it off. The backlighting/rim lighting technique where I put a speed light behind them provided me with the light I wanted. I wanted to create a shadow in the front to make the image more secretive but let that light peek around just a bit so the viewer can barely see and feel the passion that is being portrayed in this image. -Mitch\n\n \n\nImportant links:\n\nShane Mercer's Blog\n\nNodakPhoto - Facebook page, please hit that like button!\n\nStevie Rae Photography - Facebook page, please hit that like button! Website click here\n\nmJoy Photography - Facebook page, please hit that like button!  Website click here","mJoyPhoto"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:rileyworth.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":1,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"rileyworth.areavoices.com/5","permalink":"http://rileyworth.areavoices.com/2012/01/20/on-media/","blogid":"26291","blogdomain":"rileyworth.areavoices.com","hostname":"rileyworth.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Newest versions of Newt and network TV offer nothing new","content":"I was unable to watch Thursday's Republican Presidential debate, but did see the opening question in which CNN's John King removes the elephant in the room right away. Yes, I'm only speaking metaphorically. No, Chris Christie wasn't there.\n\nKing asked former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich about the news of the day that, sadly, was not truly news and hardly anyone's business. I'm referring, of course, to Gingrich's second wife (whom he divorced in 2000) Marianne, who told ABC's Brian Ross that Newt asked her for an \"open marriage.\" The segment aired this evening on \"Nightline.\" I didn't stay up to watch it. I'll explain why in a bit.\n\nGingrich's response to King's question (was it even a question?) drew outlandish excitement from the debate crowd -- a fervor Gingrich seemed to draw inspiration from -- in the way of clapping and supportive screams of \"Yea!\"\n\nFrom what I can glean at this point post-debate, Gingrich is also drawing positive support in some instant polls done after the debate. According to FiveThirtyEight.com blogger Nate Silver, who I find to be the most reliable source for poll data analysis, Gingrich is now trending in first place in South Carolina polls. Just days ago, the narrative had Romney looking unbeatable and being annointed the Nearly Nominated. (Actually, I didn't hear anyone using that term. I just made it up, as I'm a sucker for alliteration.)\n\nSure, Gingrich seized on an excitable debate moment the question created. Certainly, he had the right to be annoyed and upset a presidential debate would open with (let alone include at all) a question about a candidate's personal life. But in so doing, Gingrich did nothing new in his response, nothing different than he's done in every debate I've seen. His go-to move is smearing \"elitist media\" (his term) and trying to make the debate moderator the clear, present and constant adversary of he and the right-leaning debate audience. This time the moderator just so happened to be John King, but it could've been King Henry the Eighth. Newt doesn't care who's in the moderator's chair (or standing in King's case). Gingrich is painting right now with his broadest brush strokes. In this oft-repeated Newt view, the media reside on the left, specifically in Obama's left pocket.\n\nYet that's not what's got me torqued. I'm mad this questioning of Gingrich's second ex-wife (wow, that's a weird thing to type ... second ex-wife) ever happened, that she was even given this platform. There is never a proper time for such an interview, let alone two days before the South Carolina primary. It all felt so very GOTCHA-esque. Yellow and desparate. Ugly and ratings driven. (When is the next TV sweeps week?)\n\nAnd, yes, I'm aware this is the point where political correctness rears its multiple heads. Yes, it's bad practice to defend a serial cheater. No, I'm not defending him. Yes, it's good media practice to give a voice to the voiceless, in this case Marianne Gingrich, although she hardly fits the mold of voiceless and in need of help. No, she isn't expected to remain quiet, either, but, jeepers, have some class. You're not auditioning for Real Housewives. Or the politicians' version of Basketball Wives. To my knowledge, such a show does not exist, but can't be far off now, after this insta-classic TMI moment.\n\nI didn't stay up to see Marianne Gingrich try to maneuver for 15 more minutes of fame, mostly because I can't seem to stay up that late anymore, but also because I've made a habit of avoiding other people's beds, lying squeezed inbetween a husband and a wife or a husband and his lover for whom he's trying to attain his wife's approval, and hearing what would be classified, at best, as pillow talk. Or, at worst, as breaking news.","rawcontent":"I was unable to watch Thursday's Republican Presidential debate, but did see the opening question in which CNN's John King removes the elephant in the room right away. Yes, I'm only speaking metaphorically. No, Chris Christie wasn't there.\n\nKing asked former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich about the news of the day that, sadly, was not truly news and hardly anyone's business. I'm referring, of course, to Gingrich's second wife (whom he divorced in 2000) Marianne, who told ABC's Brian Ross that Newt asked her for an \"open marriage.\" The segment aired this evening on \"Nightline.\" I didn't stay up to watch it. I'll explain why in a bit.\n\nGingrich's response to King's question (was it even a question?) drew outlandish excitement from the debate crowd -- a fervor Gingrich seemed to draw inspiration from -- in the way of clapping and supportive screams of \"Yea!\"\n\nFrom what I can glean at this point post-debate, Gingrich is also drawing positive support in some instant polls done after the debate. According to FiveThirtyEight.com blogger Nate Silver, who I find to be the most reliable source for poll data analysis, Gingrich is now trending in first place in South Carolina polls. Just days ago, the narrative had Romney looking unbeatable and being annointed the Nearly Nominated. (Actually, I didn't hear anyone using that term. I just made it up, as I'm a sucker for alliteration.)\n\nSure, Gingrich seized on an excitable debate moment the question created. Certainly, he had the right to be annoyed and upset a presidential debate would open with (let alone include at all) a question about a candidate's personal life. But in so doing, Gingrich did nothing new in his response, nothing different than he's done in every debate I've seen. His go-to move is smearing \"elitist media\" (his term) and trying to make the debate moderator the clear, present and constant adversary of he and the right-leaning debate audience. This time the moderator just so happened to be John King, but it could've been King Henry the Eighth. Newt doesn't care who's in the moderator's chair (or standing in King's case). Gingrich is painting right now with his broadest brush strokes. In this oft-repeated Newt view, the media reside on the left, specifically in Obama's left pocket.\n\nYet that's not what's got me torqued. I'm mad this questioning of Gingrich's second ex-wife (wow, that's a weird thing to type ... second ex-wife) ever happened, that she was even given this platform. There is never a proper time for such an interview, let alone two days before the South Carolina primary. It all felt so very GOTCHA-esque. Yellow and desparate. Ugly and ratings driven. (When is the next TV sweeps week?)\n\nAnd, yes, I'm aware this is the point where political correctness rears its multiple heads. Yes, it's bad practice to defend a serial cheater. No, I'm not defending him. Yes, it's good media practice to give a voice to the voiceless, in this case Marianne Gingrich, although she hardly fits the mold of voiceless and in need of help. No, she isn't expected to remain quiet, either, but, jeepers, have some class. You're not auditioning for Real Housewives. Or the politicians' version of Basketball Wives. To my knowledge, such a show does not exist, but can't be far off now, after this insta-classic TMI moment.\n\nI didn't stay up to see Marianne Gingrich try to maneuver for 15 more minutes of fame, mostly because I can't seem to stay up that late anymore, but also because I've made a habit of avoiding other people's beds, lying squeezed inbetween a husband and a wife or a husband and his lover for whom he's trying to attain his wife's approval, and hearing what would be classified, at best, as pillow talk. Or, at worst, as breaking news.","contentnoshortcodes":"I was unable to watch Thursday's Republican Presidential debate, but did see the opening question in which CNN's John King removes the elephant in the room right away. Yes, I'm only speaking metaphorically. No, Chris Christie wasn't there.\n\nKing asked former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich about the news of the day that, sadly, was not truly news and hardly anyone's business. I'm referring, of course, to Gingrich's second wife (whom he divorced in 2000) Marianne, who told ABC's Brian Ross that Newt asked her for an \"open marriage.\" The segment aired this evening on \"Nightline.\" I didn't stay up to watch it. I'll explain why in a bit.\n\nGingrich's response to King's question (was it even a question?) drew outlandish excitement from the debate crowd -- a fervor Gingrich seemed to draw inspiration from -- in the way of clapping and supportive screams of \"Yea!\"\n\nFrom what I can glean at this point post-debate, Gingrich is also drawing positive support in some instant polls done after the debate. According to FiveThirtyEight.com blogger Nate Silver, who I find to be the most reliable source for poll data analysis, Gingrich is now trending in first place in South Carolina polls. Just days ago, the narrative had Romney looking unbeatable and being annointed the Nearly Nominated. (Actually, I didn't hear anyone using that term. I just made it up, as I'm a sucker for alliteration.)\n\nSure, Gingrich seized on an excitable debate moment the question created. Certainly, he had the right to be annoyed and upset a presidential debate would open with (let alone include at all) a question about a candidate's personal life. But in so doing, Gingrich did nothing new in his response, nothing different than he's done in every debate I've seen. His go-to move is smearing \"elitist media\" (his term) and trying to make the debate moderator the clear, present and constant adversary of he and the right-leaning debate audience. This time the moderator just so happened to be John King, but it could've been King Henry the Eighth. Newt doesn't care who's in the moderator's chair (or standing in King's case). Gingrich is painting right now with his broadest brush strokes. In this oft-repeated Newt view, the media reside on the left, specifically in Obama's left pocket.\n\nYet that's not what's got me torqued. I'm mad this questioning of Gingrich's second ex-wife (wow, that's a weird thing to type ... second ex-wife) ever happened, that she was even given this platform. There is never a proper time for such an interview, let alone two days before the South Carolina primary. It all felt so very GOTCHA-esque. Yellow and desparate. Ugly and ratings driven. (When is the next TV sweeps week?)\n\nAnd, yes, I'm aware this is the point where political correctness rears its multiple heads. Yes, it's bad practice to defend a serial cheater. No, I'm not defending him. Yes, it's good media practice to give a voice to the voiceless, in this case Marianne Gingrich, although she hardly fits the mold of voiceless and in need of help. No, she isn't expected to remain quiet, either, but, jeepers, have some class. You're not auditioning for Real Housewives. Or the politicians' version of Basketball Wives. To my knowledge, such a show does not exist, but can't be far off now, after this insta-classic TMI moment.\n\nI didn't stay up to see Marianne Gingrich try to maneuver for 15 more minutes of fame, mostly because I can't seem to stay up that late anymore, but also because I've made a habit of avoiding other people's beds, lying squeezed inbetween a husband and a wife or a husband and his lover for whom he's trying to attain his wife's approval, and hearing what would be classified, at best, as pillow talk. Or, at worst, as breaking news.","numcomments":2,"author":"rileyworth","author_s":"http://rileyworth.areavoices.com/author/rileyworth/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-01-20T12:28:39Z","displaydate":"2012-01-20 06:28:39","displaymodified":"2012-01-20 11:00:30","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Newest versions of Newt and network TV offer nothing new","I was unable to watch Thursday's Republican Presidential debate, but did see the opening question in which CNN's John King removes the elephant in the room right away. Yes, I'm only speaking metaphorically. No, Chris Christie wasn't there.\n\nKing asked former U.S. House Speaker Newt Gingrich about the news of the day that, sadly, was not truly news and hardly anyone's business. I'm referring, of course, to Gingrich's second wife (whom he divorced in 2000) Marianne, who told ABC's Brian Ross that Newt asked her for an \"open marriage.\" The segment aired this evening on \"Nightline.\" I didn't stay up to watch it. I'll explain why in a bit.\n\nGingrich's response to King's question (was it even a question?) drew outlandish excitement from the debate crowd -- a fervor Gingrich seemed to draw inspiration from -- in the way of clapping and supportive screams of \"Yea!\"\n\nFrom what I can glean at this point post-debate, Gingrich is also drawing positive support in some instant polls done after the debate. According to FiveThirtyEight.com blogger Nate Silver, who I find to be the most reliable source for poll data analysis, Gingrich is now trending in first place in South Carolina polls. Just days ago, the narrative had Romney looking unbeatable and being annointed the Nearly Nominated. (Actually, I didn't hear anyone using that term. I just made it up, as I'm a sucker for alliteration.)\n\nSure, Gingrich seized on an excitable debate moment the question created. Certainly, he had the right to be annoyed and upset a presidential debate would open with (let alone include at all) a question about a candidate's personal life. But in so doing, Gingrich did nothing new in his response, nothing different than he's done in every debate I've seen. His go-to move is smearing \"elitist media\" (his term) and trying to make the debate moderator the clear, present and constant adversary of he and the right-leaning debate audience. This time the moderator just so happened to be John King, but it could've been King Henry the Eighth. Newt doesn't care who's in the moderator's chair (or standing in King's case). Gingrich is painting right now with his broadest brush strokes. In this oft-repeated Newt view, the media reside on the left, specifically in Obama's left pocket.\n\nYet that's not what's got me torqued. I'm mad this questioning of Gingrich's second ex-wife (wow, that's a weird thing to type ... second ex-wife) ever happened, that she was even given this platform. There is never a proper time for such an interview, let alone two days before the South Carolina primary. It all felt so very GOTCHA-esque. Yellow and desparate. Ugly and ratings driven. (When is the next TV sweeps week?)\n\nAnd, yes, I'm aware this is the point where political correctness rears its multiple heads. Yes, it's bad practice to defend a serial cheater. No, I'm not defending him. Yes, it's good media practice to give a voice to the voiceless, in this case Marianne Gingrich, although she hardly fits the mold of voiceless and in need of help. No, she isn't expected to remain quiet, either, but, jeepers, have some class. You're not auditioning for Real Housewives. Or the politicians' version of Basketball Wives. To my knowledge, such a show does not exist, but can't be far off now, after this insta-classic TMI moment.\n\nI didn't stay up to see Marianne Gingrich try to maneuver for 15 more minutes of fame, mostly because I can't seem to stay up that late anymore, but also because I've made a habit of avoiding other people's beds, lying squeezed inbetween a husband and a wife or a husband and his lover for whom he's trying to attain his wife's approval, and hearing what would be classified, at best, as pillow talk. Or, at worst, as breaking news.","rileyworth"],"comments":["Thanks. I'm hoping to have another media-related blog up later tonight.","Well said. And great blog name.\nMilldawg"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:leviscatchingradius.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":285,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"leviscatchingradius.areavoices.com/1015","permalink":"http://leviscatchingradius.areavoices.com/2014/07/16/all-star-magic/","blogid":"26219","blogdomain":"leviscatchingradius.areavoices.com","hostname":"leviscatchingradius.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"all-star magic","content":"The MLB All-Star game is one of the most magical nights of the summer. Played on a Tuesday evening, it brings baseball fans, families, and friends together to see all of their heroes playing on the same major league diamond. It truly is a mesmerizing and inspiring event and it is even more special that the midsummer classic will be played on Target Field. This showcase is significant for so many reasons other than the natural state tie-in. The state of Minnesota has enjoyed games played on natural grass since 2010 and the players, coaches, fans, supporters, and friends of the BOLD baseball team were able to watch their Warriors win a Class A title in that pristine ballpark nearly a year ago. My favorite all-star memories involve amazing talents such as Torii Hunter, Pedro Martinez, and Ichiro Suzuki. Hunter's amazing catch, robbing Barry Bonds of a home run in the 2002 game held in Milwaukee is an undeniable and iconic defensive feat of brilliance that hasn't faded even though the uniforms and footage of the game has inevitably become dated. The memory of Pedro Martinez pumping fastballs at his home park of Fenway stands out as well. Especially, when he challenged the hulking Mark McGwire with a blistering heater. To see a guy built like noted Red Sox fan Matt Damon generate so much velocity was amazing to see in 1999. And nothing is routine, a lesson that was crystallized in 2001 when I saw Japanese import Ichiro Suzuki in his first all-star game. I never saw a player beat out a chopper to second base with such ease as Ichiro. That game was special because it was the last midsummer classic played by baseball's Iron Man Cal Ripken Jr. but that dazzling display of speed is an artifact of the game that I will always cherish. This terrific night will involve former Twins such as Carlos Gomez, Pat Neshek, and Justin Morneau in the always captivating home run derby. If it is power you fancy, Jose Bautista and Giancarlo Stanton will be there. If it is special speed, look no further than Gomez or Mike Trout. And for no surprises hardball, Clayton Kershaw will bring the heat. All eight positional players for the AL will be from different teams, so if you don't want to see multiple players wearing the same cap of a rival team in this jewel of a park, you are in luck. A special night in a special ballpark, it doesn't get much better on a Tuesday night in the middle of the summer than this.","rawcontent":"The MLB All-Star game is one of the most magical nights of the summer. Played on a Tuesday evening, it brings baseball fans, families, and friends together to see all of their heroes playing on the same major league diamond. It truly is a mesmerizing and inspiring event and it is even more special that the midsummer classic will be played on Target Field. This showcase is significant for so many reasons other than the natural state tie-in. The state of Minnesota has enjoyed games played on natural grass since 2010 and the players, coaches, fans, supporters, and friends of the BOLD baseball team were able to watch their Warriors win a Class A title in that pristine ballpark nearly a year ago. My favorite all-star memories involve amazing talents such as Torii Hunter, Pedro Martinez, and Ichiro Suzuki. Hunter's amazing catch, robbing Barry Bonds of a home run in the 2002 game held in Milwaukee is an undeniable and iconic defensive feat of brilliance that hasn't faded even though the uniforms and footage of the game has inevitably become dated. The memory of Pedro Martinez pumping fastballs at his home park of Fenway stands out as well. Especially, when he challenged the hulking Mark McGwire with a blistering heater. To see a guy built like noted Red Sox fan Matt Damon generate so much velocity was amazing to see in 1999. And nothing is routine, a lesson that was crystallized in 2001 when I saw Japanese import Ichiro Suzuki in his first all-star game. I never saw a player beat out a chopper to second base with such ease as Ichiro. That game was special because it was the last midsummer classic played by baseball's Iron Man Cal Ripken Jr. but that dazzling display of speed is an artifact of the game that I will always cherish. This terrific night will involve former Twins such as Carlos Gomez, Pat Neshek, and Justin Morneau in the always captivating home run derby. If it is power you fancy, Jose Bautista and Giancarlo Stanton will be there. If it is special speed, look no further than Gomez or Mike Trout. And for no surprises hardball, Clayton Kershaw will bring the heat. All eight positional players for the AL will be from different teams, so if you don't want to see multiple players wearing the same cap of a rival team in this jewel of a park, you are in luck. A special night in a special ballpark, it doesn't get much better on a Tuesday night in the middle of the summer than this.","contentnoshortcodes":"The MLB All-Star game is one of the most magical nights of the summer. Played on a Tuesday evening, it brings baseball fans, families, and friends together to see all of their heroes playing on the same major league diamond. It truly is a mesmerizing and inspiring event and it is even more special that the midsummer classic will be played on Target Field. This showcase is significant for so many reasons other than the natural state tie-in. The state of Minnesota has enjoyed games played on natural grass since 2010 and the players, coaches, fans, supporters, and friends of the BOLD baseball team were able to watch their Warriors win a Class A title in that pristine ballpark nearly a year ago. My favorite all-star memories involve amazing talents such as Torii Hunter, Pedro Martinez, and Ichiro Suzuki. Hunter's amazing catch, robbing Barry Bonds of a home run in the 2002 game held in Milwaukee is an undeniable and iconic defensive feat of brilliance that hasn't faded even though the uniforms and footage of the game has inevitably become dated. The memory of Pedro Martinez pumping fastballs at his home park of Fenway stands out as well. Especially, when he challenged the hulking Mark McGwire with a blistering heater. To see a guy built like noted Red Sox fan Matt Damon generate so much velocity was amazing to see in 1999. And nothing is routine, a lesson that was crystallized in 2001 when I saw Japanese import Ichiro Suzuki in his first all-star game. I never saw a player beat out a chopper to second base with such ease as Ichiro. That game was special because it was the last midsummer classic played by baseball's Iron Man Cal Ripken Jr. but that dazzling display of speed is an artifact of the game that I will always cherish. This terrific night will involve former Twins such as Carlos Gomez, Pat Neshek, and Justin Morneau in the always captivating home run derby. If it is power you fancy, Jose Bautista and Giancarlo Stanton will be there. If it is special speed, look no further than Gomez or Mike Trout. And for no surprises hardball, Clayton Kershaw will bring the heat. All eight positional players for the AL will be from different teams, so if you don't want to see multiple players wearing the same cap of a rival team in this jewel of a park, you are in luck. A special night in a special ballpark, it doesn't get much better on a Tuesday night in the middle of the summer than this.","numcomments":0,"author":"Levi W.","author_s":"http://leviscatchingradius.areavoices.com/author/leviweberjr/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-16T23:18:30Z","displaydate":"2014-07-16 23:18:30","displaymodified":"2014-07-16 23:18:30","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["all-star magic","The MLB All-Star game is one of the most magical nights of the summer. Played on a Tuesday evening, it brings baseball fans, families, and friends together to see all of their heroes playing on the same major league diamond. It truly is a mesmerizing and inspiring event and it is even more special that the midsummer classic will be played on Target Field. This showcase is significant for so many reasons other than the natural state tie-in. The state of Minnesota has enjoyed games played on natural grass since 2010 and the players, coaches, fans, supporters, and friends of the BOLD baseball team were able to watch their Warriors win a Class A title in that pristine ballpark nearly a year ago. My favorite all-star memories involve amazing talents such as Torii Hunter, Pedro Martinez, and Ichiro Suzuki. Hunter's amazing catch, robbing Barry Bonds of a home run in the 2002 game held in Milwaukee is an undeniable and iconic defensive feat of brilliance that hasn't faded even though the uniforms and footage of the game has inevitably become dated. The memory of Pedro Martinez pumping fastballs at his home park of Fenway stands out as well. Especially, when he challenged the hulking Mark McGwire with a blistering heater. To see a guy built like noted Red Sox fan Matt Damon generate so much velocity was amazing to see in 1999. And nothing is routine, a lesson that was crystallized in 2001 when I saw Japanese import Ichiro Suzuki in his first all-star game. I never saw a player beat out a chopper to second base with such ease as Ichiro. That game was special because it was the last midsummer classic played by baseball's Iron Man Cal Ripken Jr. but that dazzling display of speed is an artifact of the game that I will always cherish. This terrific night will involve former Twins such as Carlos Gomez, Pat Neshek, and Justin Morneau in the always captivating home run derby. If it is power you fancy, Jose Bautista and Giancarlo Stanton will be there. If it is special speed, look no further than Gomez or Mike Trout. And for no surprises hardball, Clayton Kershaw will bring the heat. All eight positional players for the AL will be from different teams, so if you don't want to see multiple players wearing the same cap of a rival team in this jewel of a park, you are in luck. A special night in a special ballpark, it doesn't get much better on a Tuesday night in the middle of the summer than this.","Levi W."]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:thegooddog.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":13,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"thegooddog.areavoices.com/212","permalink":"http://thegooddog.areavoices.com/2012/07/24/rescue-dog/","blogid":"26366","blogdomain":"thegooddog.areavoices.com","hostname":"thegooddog.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Rescue Dog","content":"Rescue Dog\nA Poem By Lisa Sellman\nI completely loathe the hours that I spend at work;\nI file papers and type all day and my boss is a jerk.\nMy life was destined to be exciting, unique & thrilling;\nInstead I spend my day longing for a job that is fulfilling.\nI was a full bright scholar in my youth;\nI was envied by all, if you want the truth.\nMy parents demanded that I attend law school;\nInstead I became a mime and thought it was cool.\nI adored Mercel Marceau and planned to be a star;\nI stopped going to classes and told my teachers, au revoir.\nMy days were spent doing the art that I so adored;\nInstead of reality, I lived via my vision board.\nI only am now happy when I leave my desk at the DMV;\nI rush home as fast as I can like a just released parolee.\nMy home is shared with someone who finds me perfect;\nInstead of co-workers ready to judge my intellect.\nI used to come home and my only friend was Judge Judy;\nI now am languished by kisses from my dog Rudy.\nMy wit is amazing and my sense of humor divine;\nInstead of a boss that hates me, I am loved by this canine.\nI found him by accident while looking on Craig’s List;\nI was taken with his beautiful eyes and could not resist.\nMy heart was so broken and needed repair;\nInstead of me rescuing him, he was the answer to my prayer.\n\n ","rawcontent":"Rescue Dog\nA Poem By Lisa Sellman\nI completely loathe the hours that I spend at work;\nI file papers and type all day and my boss is a jerk.\nMy life was destined to be exciting, unique & thrilling;\nInstead I spend my day longing for a job that is fulfilling.\nI was a full bright scholar in my youth;\nI was envied by all, if you want the truth.\nMy parents demanded that I attend law school;\nInstead I became a mime and thought it was cool.\nI adored Mercel Marceau and planned to be a star;\nI stopped going to classes and told my teachers, au revoir.\nMy days were spent doing the art that I so adored;\nInstead of reality, I lived via my vision board.\nI only am now happy when I leave my desk at the DMV;\nI rush home as fast as I can like a just released parolee.\nMy home is shared with someone who finds me perfect;\nInstead of co-workers ready to judge my intellect.\nI used to come home and my only friend was Judge Judy;\nI now am languished by kisses from my dog Rudy.\nMy wit is amazing and my sense of humor divine;\nInstead of a boss that hates me, I am loved by this canine.\nI found him by accident while looking on Craigs List;\nI was taken with his beautiful eyes and could not resist.\nMy heart was so broken and needed repair;\nInstead of me rescuing him, he was the answer to my prayer.\n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"Rescue Dog\nA Poem By Lisa Sellman\nI completely loathe the hours that I spend at work;\nI file papers and type all day and my boss is a jerk.\nMy life was destined to be exciting, unique & thrilling;\nInstead I spend my day longing for a job that is fulfilling.\nI was a full bright scholar in my youth;\nI was envied by all, if you want the truth.\nMy parents demanded that I attend law school;\nInstead I became a mime and thought it was cool.\nI adored Mercel Marceau and planned to be a star;\nI stopped going to classes and told my teachers, au revoir.\nMy days were spent doing the art that I so adored;\nInstead of reality, I lived via my vision board.\nI only am now happy when I leave my desk at the DMV;\nI rush home as fast as I can like a just released parolee.\nMy home is shared with someone who finds me perfect;\nInstead of co-workers ready to judge my intellect.\nI used to come home and my only friend was Judge Judy;\nI now am languished by kisses from my dog Rudy.\nMy wit is amazing and my sense of humor divine;\nInstead of a boss that hates me, I am loved by this canine.\nI found him by accident while looking on Craigs List;\nI was taken with his beautiful eyes and could not resist.\nMy heart was so broken and needed repair;\nInstead of me rescuing him, he was the answer to my prayer.\n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Lisa Sellman","author_s":"http://thegooddog.areavoices.com/author/hipncool/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-07-25T04:51:22Z","displaydate":"2012-07-24 23:51:22","displaymodified":"2012-07-24 23:51:22","tags":["Gratitude","Lisa Sellman","poetry","Rescue Dog","The Good Dog Handling & Training"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Rescue Dog","Rescue Dog\nA Poem By Lisa Sellman\nI completely loathe the hours that I spend at work;\nI file papers and type all day and my boss is a jerk.\nMy life was destined to be exciting, unique & thrilling;\nInstead I spend my day longing for a job that is fulfilling.\nI was a full bright scholar in my youth;\nI was envied by all, if you want the truth.\nMy parents demanded that I attend law school;\nInstead I became a mime and thought it was cool.\nI adored Mercel Marceau and planned to be a star;\nI stopped going to classes and told my teachers, au revoir.\nMy days were spent doing the art that I so adored;\nInstead of reality, I lived via my vision board.\nI only am now happy when I leave my desk at the DMV;\nI rush home as fast as I can like a just released parolee.\nMy home is shared with someone who finds me perfect;\nInstead of co-workers ready to judge my intellect.\nI used to come home and my only friend was Judge Judy;\nI now am languished by kisses from my dog Rudy.\nMy wit is amazing and my sense of humor divine;\nInstead of a boss that hates me, I am loved by this canine.\nI found him by accident while looking on Craig’s List;\nI was taken with his beautiful eyes and could not resist.\nMy heart was so broken and needed repair;\nInstead of me rescuing him, he was the answer to my prayer.\n\n ","Lisa Sellman"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:letters.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":170,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"letters.areavoices.com/85137","permalink":"http://letters.areavoices.com/2013/07/12/i-have-moved/","blogid":"633","blogdomain":"letters.areavoices.com","hostname":"letters.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"I have moved!","content":"This blog has moved. You may now find me at: http://carrieclasson.com/blog","rawcontent":"This blog has moved. You may now find me at: http://carrieclasson.com/blog","contentnoshortcodes":"This blog has moved. You may now find me at: http://carrieclasson.com/blog","numcomments":0,"author":"letters","author_s":"http://letters.areavoices.com/author/letters/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-07-12T21:20:10Z","displaydate":"2013-07-12 21:20:10","displaymodified":"2013-07-12 21:23:37","spell":["I have moved!","This blog has moved. You may now find me at: http://carrieclasson.com/blog","letters"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:womanabouttown.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":33,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"womanabouttown.areavoices.com/333","permalink":"http://womanabouttown.areavoices.com/2013/08/14/grief-over-a-pet/","blogid":"26619","blogdomain":"womanabouttown.areavoices.com","hostname":"womanabouttown.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Grief Over a Pet","content":"Stella Bella:\nOh, how I love a cat named Stella.\n\n \n\nI remember being nervous about taking home such a skittish kitten. Stella shared a cage with Skip at the Humane Society. Skip had me right from the start. But Stella was cautious with me. Without even looking, she could sense my hand coming near and she’d dart this way and that to avoid capture. I brought both cats home and hoped for the best.\n\n \n\nI put my new feline friends in the bathroom when I got home so they could get used to a small space at first. It was hard to leave them alone while I went to work the next day. When I returned home, I eagerly ran up the 3 flights of stairs to get to my condo. I opened the bathroom door, and there they were, safe and sound and looking up at me with happy eyes. I stepped closer to Stella, and she didn’t dart away. She continued to look up at me, and she didn’t scramble while I reached down and pet her. She had accepted me. Sigh of relief.\n\n \n\nThe first night out of the bathroom, both cats slept on the bed with me. When I woke up in the morning, Skip was wrapped around the top of my head, and Stella was asleep in my hand. My heart melted.\n\n \n\nStella was such a funny little thing. When she was a kitten, she loved to fetch. And she loved to dig out makeup brushes from the bathroom drawer and wrestle them to the ground. And of course I would toss a makeup brush down the hallway for her to chase. She’d bring it back, drop it at my feet, and wait for the next toss.\n\n \n\nShe loved heights, and that included the tops of doors. She didn’t especially like being held, so if you were holding her and standing by a door, she would reach up and look for a grasp on the door or wall.  I’d give her a boost, and she’d pull herself up to the top of the door. So cute. She would stay there for a while, purring like crazy and squirming  around like it was the best place on earth. Once or twice, she used my back as a springboard on her way back down to the ground. We got in the habit of calling her “My favorite little black monkey kitty.”\n\n \n\nTwo years after getting Skip and Stella, Dane and I got married. Dane grew to love the kitties, and the affection was returned. Stella loved to push the envelope at her new home. One day, we watched in awe and horror as Stella jumped from the railing of the deck to the roof. But when her front paws reached the roof, it was the flimsy gutter that she grasped. Even with a tenuous hold, she used grace and athleticism to pull herself up.\n\n \n\nWe let the cats outside a lot. They seemed to know the boundaries of the yard and would usually stay within them. Stella was a small cat but she didn’t know that. She would chase neighborhood cats out of her territory. I even saw her stomp her paw on the ground in front of another cat as if to say “This is MY land.”\n\n \n\nWe were so blessed to have Stella. She showed love by rubbing up against us, rising up to meet a hand, and sleeping at the foot of the bed. When we watched movies, she would snuggle on my legs. And once in a while when I picked her up, she would press herself up against me and purr.\n\n \n\nStella isn’t around anymore. She was venturing out 2 weeks ago, expanding her territory, when she got hit by a car. It was a hit and run.  I found her in the front yard of our neighbor’s house. We buried her in our back yard, in a box, with a few blades of grass, a leaf, and a makeup brush.\n\n \n\nOh, how I grieve for a cat named Stella.","rawcontent":"Stella Bella:\nOh, how I love a cat named Stella.\n\n \n\nI remember being nervous about taking home such a skittish kitten. Stella shared a cage with Skip at the Humane Society. Skip had me right from the start. But Stella was cautious with me. Without even looking, she could sense my hand coming near and shed dart this way and that to avoid capture. I brought both cats home and hoped for the best.\n\n \n\nI put my new feline friends in the bathroom when I got home so they could get used to a small space at first. It was hard to leave them alone while I went to work the next day. When I returned home, I eagerly ran up the 3 flights of stairs to get to my condo. I opened the bathroom door, and there they were, safe and sound and looking up at me with happy eyes. I stepped closer to Stella, and she didnt dart away. She continued to look up at me, and she didnt scramble while I reached down and pet her. She had accepted me. Sigh of relief.\n\n \n\nThe first night out of the bathroom, both cats slept on the bed with me. When I woke up in the morning, Skip was wrapped around the top of my head, and Stella was asleep in my hand. My heart melted.\n\n \n\nStella was such a funny little thing. When she was a kitten, she loved to fetch. And she loved to dig out makeup brushes from the bathroom drawer and wrestle them to the ground. And of course I would toss a makeup brush down the hallway for her to chase. Shed bring it back, drop it at my feet, and wait for the next toss.\n\n \n\nShe loved heights, and that included the tops of doors. She didnt especially like being held, so if you were holding her and standing by a door, she would reach up and look for a grasp on the door or wall. Id give her a boost, and shed pull herself up to the top of the door. So cute. She would stay there for a while, purring like crazy and squirming around like it was the best place on earth. Once or twice, she used my back as a springboard on her way back down to the ground. We got in the habit of calling her My favorite little black monkey kitty.\n\n \n\nTwo years after getting Skip and Stella, Dane and I got married. Dane grew to love the kitties, and the affection was returned. Stella loved to push the envelope at her new home. One day, we watched in awe and horror as Stella jumped from the railing of the deck to the roof. But when her front paws reached the roof, it was the flimsy gutter that she grasped. Even with a tenuous hold, she used grace and athleticism to pull herself up.\n\n \n\nWe let the cats outside a lot. They seemed to know the boundaries of the yard and would usually stay within them. Stella was a small cat but she didnt know that. She would chase neighborhood cats out of her territory. I even saw her stomp her paw on the ground in front of another cat as if to say This is MY land.\n\n \n\nWe were so blessed to have Stella. She showed love by rubbing up against us, rising up to meet a hand, and sleeping at the foot of the bed. When we watched movies, she would snuggle on my legs. And once in a while when I picked her up, she would press herself up against me and purr.\n\n \n\nStella isnt around anymore. She was venturing out 2 weeks ago, expanding her territory, when she got hit by a car. It was a hit and run. I found her in the front yard of our neighbors house. We buried her in our back yard, in a box, with a few blades of grass, a leaf, and a makeup brush.\n\n \n\nOh, how I grieve for a cat named Stella.","contentnoshortcodes":"Stella Bella:\nOh, how I love a cat named Stella.\n\n \n\nI remember being nervous about taking home such a skittish kitten. Stella shared a cage with Skip at the Humane Society. Skip had me right from the start. But Stella was cautious with me. Without even looking, she could sense my hand coming near and shed dart this way and that to avoid capture. I brought both cats home and hoped for the best.\n\n \n\nI put my new feline friends in the bathroom when I got home so they could get used to a small space at first. It was hard to leave them alone while I went to work the next day. When I returned home, I eagerly ran up the 3 flights of stairs to get to my condo. I opened the bathroom door, and there they were, safe and sound and looking up at me with happy eyes. I stepped closer to Stella, and she didnt dart away. She continued to look up at me, and she didnt scramble while I reached down and pet her. She had accepted me. Sigh of relief.\n\n \n\nThe first night out of the bathroom, both cats slept on the bed with me. When I woke up in the morning, Skip was wrapped around the top of my head, and Stella was asleep in my hand. My heart melted.\n\n \n\nStella was such a funny little thing. When she was a kitten, she loved to fetch. And she loved to dig out makeup brushes from the bathroom drawer and wrestle them to the ground. And of course I would toss a makeup brush down the hallway for her to chase. Shed bring it back, drop it at my feet, and wait for the next toss.\n\n \n\nShe loved heights, and that included the tops of doors. She didnt especially like being held, so if you were holding her and standing by a door, she would reach up and look for a grasp on the door or wall. Id give her a boost, and shed pull herself up to the top of the door. So cute. She would stay there for a while, purring like crazy and squirming around like it was the best place on earth. Once or twice, she used my back as a springboard on her way back down to the ground. We got in the habit of calling her My favorite little black monkey kitty.\n\n \n\nTwo years after getting Skip and Stella, Dane and I got married. Dane grew to love the kitties, and the affection was returned. Stella loved to push the envelope at her new home. One day, we watched in awe and horror as Stella jumped from the railing of the deck to the roof. But when her front paws reached the roof, it was the flimsy gutter that she grasped. Even with a tenuous hold, she used grace and athleticism to pull herself up.\n\n \n\nWe let the cats outside a lot. They seemed to know the boundaries of the yard and would usually stay within them. Stella was a small cat but she didnt know that. She would chase neighborhood cats out of her territory. I even saw her stomp her paw on the ground in front of another cat as if to say This is MY land.\n\n \n\nWe were so blessed to have Stella. She showed love by rubbing up against us, rising up to meet a hand, and sleeping at the foot of the bed. When we watched movies, she would snuggle on my legs. And once in a while when I picked her up, she would press herself up against me and purr.\n\n \n\nStella isnt around anymore. She was venturing out 2 weeks ago, expanding her territory, when she got hit by a car. It was a hit and run. I found her in the front yard of our neighbors house. We buried her in our back yard, in a box, with a few blades of grass, a leaf, and a makeup brush.\n\n \n\nOh, how I grieve for a cat named Stella.","numcomments":0,"author":"womanabouttown","author_s":"http://womanabouttown.areavoices.com/author/womanabouttown/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-08-14T13:25:11Z","displaydate":"2013-08-14 08:25:11","displaymodified":"2013-08-14 08:49:16","tags":["grief over a pet"],"categories":["My Cats","Willmar"],"spell":["Grief Over a Pet","Stella Bella:\nOh, how I love a cat named Stella.\n\n \n\nI remember being nervous about taking home such a skittish kitten. Stella shared a cage with Skip at the Humane Society. Skip had me right from the start. But Stella was cautious with me. Without even looking, she could sense my hand coming near and she’d dart this way and that to avoid capture. I brought both cats home and hoped for the best.\n\n \n\nI put my new feline friends in the bathroom when I got home so they could get used to a small space at first. It was hard to leave them alone while I went to work the next day. When I returned home, I eagerly ran up the 3 flights of stairs to get to my condo. I opened the bathroom door, and there they were, safe and sound and looking up at me with happy eyes. I stepped closer to Stella, and she didn’t dart away. She continued to look up at me, and she didn’t scramble while I reached down and pet her. She had accepted me. Sigh of relief.\n\n \n\nThe first night out of the bathroom, both cats slept on the bed with me. When I woke up in the morning, Skip was wrapped around the top of my head, and Stella was asleep in my hand. My heart melted.\n\n \n\nStella was such a funny little thing. When she was a kitten, she loved to fetch. And she loved to dig out makeup brushes from the bathroom drawer and wrestle them to the ground. And of course I would toss a makeup brush down the hallway for her to chase. She’d bring it back, drop it at my feet, and wait for the next toss.\n\n \n\nShe loved heights, and that included the tops of doors. She didn’t especially like being held, so if you were holding her and standing by a door, she would reach up and look for a grasp on the door or wall.  I’d give her a boost, and she’d pull herself up to the top of the door. So cute. She would stay there for a while, purring like crazy and squirming  around like it was the best place on earth. Once or twice, she used my back as a springboard on her way back down to the ground. We got in the habit of calling her “My favorite little black monkey kitty.”\n\n \n\nTwo years after getting Skip and Stella, Dane and I got married. Dane grew to love the kitties, and the affection was returned. Stella loved to push the envelope at her new home. One day, we watched in awe and horror as Stella jumped from the railing of the deck to the roof. But when her front paws reached the roof, it was the flimsy gutter that she grasped. Even with a tenuous hold, she used grace and athleticism to pull herself up.\n\n \n\nWe let the cats outside a lot. They seemed to know the boundaries of the yard and would usually stay within them. Stella was a small cat but she didn’t know that. She would chase neighborhood cats out of her territory. I even saw her stomp her paw on the ground in front of another cat as if to say “This is MY land.”\n\n \n\nWe were so blessed to have Stella. She showed love by rubbing up against us, rising up to meet a hand, and sleeping at the foot of the bed. When we watched movies, she would snuggle on my legs. And once in a while when I picked her up, she would press herself up against me and purr.\n\n \n\nStella isn’t around anymore. She was venturing out 2 weeks ago, expanding her territory, when she got hit by a car. It was a hit and run.  I found her in the front yard of our neighbor’s house. We buried her in our back yard, in a box, with a few blades of grass, a leaf, and a makeup brush.\n\n \n\nOh, how I grieve for a cat named Stella.","womanabouttown"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:edashquipafricadotorg.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":35,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com/710","permalink":"http://aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com/2012/10/27/home-sweet-home-china-in-minnesota/","blogid":"26621","blogdomain":"aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com","hostname":"aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Home Sweet Home: China in Minnesota","content":"All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org!  :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier. Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe. We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3640\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developing and America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morning where I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent. Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle. A neighborhood of three-story homes is a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3574\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] My nephew, Robert, and a lovely pair of twins that my sister-in-law babysat.[/caption]\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo. Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.  This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3575\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] 'Your move, Ted.' Not too much of a clash here, actually. Brought me back to my Zhuhai neighborhood where old folks would play cards ot their own board games.[/caption]\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3641\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3585\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] These are the headwaters coming out of Lake Itasca.[/caption]\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3580\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] Go ahead and cross the river for fun.[/caption]\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3582\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"563\"] After a year of black hair everywhere, these kids were decidedly Minnesotan.[/caption]\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3604\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Son took the picture with the two Chinese women, my mother, and myself.[/caption]\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out  a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3628\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"550\"] host/owner, I believe[/caption]\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded. (I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :)  It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or 再见 or good bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't think for a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released!  Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","rawcontent":"All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org! :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier.Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe.We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3640\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developingand America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morningwhere I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent.Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle.A neighborhood ofthree-story homesis a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3574\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] My nephew, Robert, and a lovely pair of twins that my sister-in-law babysat.[/caption]\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo.Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3575\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] 'Your move, Ted.'Not too much of a clash here, actually. Brought me back to my Zhuhai neighborhood where old folks would play cards ot their own board games.[/caption]\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3641\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3585\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] These are the headwaters coming out of Lake Itasca.[/caption]\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3580\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] Go ahead and cross the river for fun.[/caption]\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3582\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"563\"] After a year of black hair everywhere, these kids were decidedly Minnesotan.[/caption]\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3604\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Son took the picture with the two Chinese women, my mother, and myself.[/caption]\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3628\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"550\"] host/owner, I believe[/caption]\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded.(I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :) It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or orgood bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't thinkfor a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released! Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","contentnoshortcodes":"All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org! :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier.Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe.We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developingand America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morningwhere I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent.Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle.A neighborhood ofthree-story homesis a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo.Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded.(I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :) It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or orgood bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't thinkfor a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released! Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","numcomments":0,"author":"Brandon Ferdig","author_s":"http://aminnesotaninchina.areavoices.com/author/brandonferdig/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-10-27T16:31:33Z","displaydate":"2012-10-27 16:31:33","displaymodified":"2012-10-27 16:31:33","tags":["Bemidji","Blackduck","book","Buffalo","buffet","Chicago","Chinese food","eBook","headwaters","history","home","homecoming","Itasca State Park","Minneapolis","Mississippi River","New Plateaus","Shanghai","travel","Twin Cities","Zhuhai"],"categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Home Sweet Home: China in Minnesota","All of you who've read my posts are awesome. Thank you for following along. While I'm sad to see this journey end, I'm excited with anticipation because this was just my first try. I'll be writing many more travel-inspired pieces as I explore new parts of the world. (Next on my radar is East Africa.) Also, this blog was just a rough draft. A more complete, polished effort is being tailored presently: a book (and a flashy eBook) of all the pictures, footage, lessons, insights, and emotions China provided. Expect it to be available this winter!\n\nSince you won't be hearing from me any longer on this blog, allow me to keep you in the loop of my travels and book release. Just leave a comment below or follow me on one of my social media or simply visit my blog, New Plateaus, to stay up to date and able to read all my non-travel articles--many of which are being featured in the Minneapolis Star Tribune and MPR.org!  :)\n\nLet us now proceed with this final chapter: my arrival back and experiences being re-introduced to Minnesota. (And how China was back home waiting for me.)\n\nI left Zhuhai on an unusually clear, beautiful, warm, sunny day. The car ride to the airport featured lush green palm trees and bright blue skies that lit up the brand-new housing developments being erected along the highway. It was a wonderful lasting impression; it made me sad to leave. It always is a little hard and weighty to leave behind a place and the people you may never get to see and experience again, especially after being there a while.\n\nFrom the little Zhuhai airport I flew to Shanghai. A couple hours in the Shanghai airport had me wandering around looking for food that wasn't too crazy expensive. Near our gate, I talked to a tall, red-headed American/German girl who just had the time of her life working in Shanghai for the summer. She'd probably be the envy of many-a-situated adult in America who wished they'd studied/worked abroad in a land so different and freeing. Heck, I envied her care-free spirit.\n\nSoon I left Shanghai (and China--on the day my visa expired) en route to Chicago. This American flight differed from the ones I was used to in Asia. Food was worse and flight attendants grumpier. Finally, it was a jaunt in the air from Chicago to Minneapolis.\n\nI was home.\n\nMy brother picked me up from MSP. (He also dropped me off here 11 months prior.) I saw his car approach and his face behind the wheel. He stepped out. What do you say when you haven't seen someone in a while? There's always that neat reunion vibe. We greeting one another and drove out to his house an hour west in Buffalo, MN:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3640\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nIt struck me how everything looked the same as I remember in the Twin Cities. China was always building. My brother, Jerald, responded that China is developing and America is developed. I suppose he's right, but in the coming days and weeks, I'd feel the lack of growth-energy here in America.\n\nA box of Grapenuts, which I missed so much in China, was waiting for me at Jerald's house. He's awesome. I had a bowl that night and stayed up much too late as it felt like the afternoon hours to my China bio-clock. I then got up (at 5am) and did my tai chi routine established back in Hubei province.\n\nThis first, fresh morning where I practiced some calming, meditative exercise revealed the stark contrasts between American life and that which I was used to in China. It was the clean neighborhood---which seemed sparkling; the single-family homes---which seemed luxurious; and the quiet environment---which seemed silent. Not only were these attributes exaggerated because, in significant ways, China is the opposite. They also seemed sharp because being away awhile allows for fresh eyes upon return.\n\nIt wasn't just the environment that clashed, but the lifestyle. A neighborhood of three-story homes is a rare site in China where almost everyone I met lived in an apartment complex. Though affordable in America, it doesn't come cheap. Debt is the key word as Americans live on borrowed dollars and are contented (and motivated) to put in long days and nights working to stay above the red. I don't think people back in China know this kind of lifestyle so well. Nor am I sure they'd want to.\n\nDifferent folks, different strokes.\n\nOne thing I can say, though: it's nice to have nice things. And it's nice to provide a nice home for children:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3574\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] My nephew, Robert, and a lovely pair of twins that my sister-in-law babysat.[/caption]\n\nGetting around in the days to come, I'd make my way into the heart of Buffalo. Seeing the foundations of a community in most places in the world is challenging because you have to dig deep. But in America nothing's too old, and downtown areas of any town--particularly smaller ones--are not too different than the ways they were erected 150 years prior. One-story, uninterrupted buildings line the streets and housing small businesses such as bakeries, bookstores, and hardware shops.  This \"3-D\" view of a town (the history recognized) is quite doable and refreshing.\n\nI visited the local coffee shop, \"Buffalo Books\" where I'd write and watch:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3575\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] 'Your move, Ted.' Not too much of a clash here, actually. Brought me back to my Zhuhai neighborhood where old folks would play cards ot their own board games.[/caption]\n\nAfter a couple weeks, I headed up to my hometown, Blackduck, to visit family. It was way up here, of all places, away from the big city, that some residual \"Chinese\" experiences occurred.\n\nHere's a map of Bemidji, Minnesota, the biggest town up there.\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3641\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] map[/caption]\n\nFirst, my mother and I decided to visit Itasca State Park on a lovely Saturday. It's a beautiful nature reserve full of lakes, hills, forests, and most notably, the headwaters of the Mississippi River:\n\n\n\n\n\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3585\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"422\"] These are the headwaters coming out of Lake Itasca.[/caption]\n\nThat's right. That's the \"mighty Mississippi\". All mountains start with a slight incline, all fires with a spark, and similarly, the Mississippi with a creek:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3580\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"563\"] Go ahead and cross the river for fun.[/caption]\n\n\n\nOthers enjoying themselves:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3582\" align=\"alignnone\" width=\"563\"] After a year of black hair everywhere, these kids were decidedly Minnesotan.[/caption]\n\n\n\n\n\nWe started driving home through park, but decided to make one last stop to enjoy a beautiful view over a lake. Walking down the path, I heard some talking. It was definitely foreign yet strangely familiar. I caught a word or two and thought, \"That's Mandarin Chinese\". We encountered three folks from China along the wooden walk-way. A middle-aged woman who works for 3M drove up this weekend to see the park with her friend and son who studies in London:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3604\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"584\"] Son took the picture with the two Chinese women, my mother, and myself.[/caption]\n\nThey were surprised to find an American in rural Minnesota who knew some Chinese. I was surprised to find Chinese people in a place about as far from China as I thought I could get! I told them about my year in Zhuhai and we shared a nice interaction.\n\nI wanted to keep the theme going, so that night I sought out  a taste of the local American-Chinese food:\n\n\n\nI entered and greeted the host:\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_3628\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"550\"] host/owner, I believe[/caption]\n\nA wonderfully typical American-Chinese restaurant: Chinese inspired art, family-style restaurant layout, and of course, as much yummy, goopy food as you can stand:\n\n\n\n\n\nNone of the employees knew English, except these two:\n\n\n\nWhile I ate, the fella and I spoke. He's been in America for quite sometime---originally in New York City. He came to Bemidji several years ago to open his restaurant. He doesn't like the cold, originally being from SE China (as were the employees), but as happens in life in any country, his children and wife keep him grounded. (I had met Americans settled down with family in China, as well.)\n\nThis day was a strange and pleasant bizarro experience of the few Chinese in rural Minnesota.\n\nBeing in China all those months, there were times I longed for the chance to eat \"normal\" food, see the things I was used to, and be around \"my people\". Now back, I'm excited to say \"Ni hao\" when I can. :)  It's a fitting gesture, representing the lasting impact a trip abroad can have on someone, displaying the eagerness with which I want to share my experiences, and a continuing to live a bigger life open to those who I wouldn't have interacted with prior.\n\nUnfortunately, with this newfound openness, it's also time to close the story that is this blog. I'll say \"Zai jian\" or 再见 or good bye. It was a blast sharing my journey with you; I hope you got something from it as well.\n\n \n\n-Brandon\n\nBut don't think for a second this means an end to our interactivity. We just need to change venues. Comment below and I'll contact you when I start a new travel and when my book is released!  Follow one of my social networks or come visit my main blog, New Plateaus to be notified of goings-on but also to catch a drift of all my latest writings.","Brandon Ferdig"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:willmarcurlingclub.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:thisability.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":12,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"thisability.areavoices.com/58","permalink":"http://thisability.areavoices.com/2013/03/10/just-something-to-share/","blogid":"26596","blogdomain":"thisability.areavoices.com","hostname":"thisability.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Just Something to Share","content":"As I'm getting older the follies of the younger generation become more and more irritating and no doubt that my parents felt the same as us kids grew into adulthood. However, once in a great while you read a story or see a video of some the young adult that understands the bigger world around them. In sports this is all too often forgotten,there are only WINNERS and second place is only the first place loser. I played several sports in high school and always considered myself athletic, but I too was only concerned with victories.\n\nPlease take a look at the amazing selflessness of a 12/13-year-old wrestler (I started wrestling at the age of nine) and I dare you not to feel some emotions. \"You Can Do Anything You Want\" will remind us all that there is more to athletics than just winning and losing.\n\nSpring is just around the corner, my wheels are itching for green grass!","rawcontent":"As I'm getting older the follies of the younger generation become more and more irritating and no doubt that my parents felt the same as us kids grew into adulthood. However, once in a great while you read a story or see a video of some the young adult that understands the bigger world around them. In sports this is all too often forgotten,there are only WINNERS and second place is only the first place loser. I played several sports in high school and always considered myself athletic, but I too was only concerned with victories.\n\nPlease take a look at the amazing selflessness of a 12/13-year-old wrestler (I started wrestling at the age of nine) and I dare you not to feel some emotions.\"You Can Do Anything You Want\"will remind us all that there is more to athletics than just winning and losing.\n\nSpring is just around the corner, my wheels are itching for green grass!","contentnoshortcodes":"As I'm getting older the follies of the younger generation become more and more irritating and no doubt that my parents felt the same as us kids grew into adulthood. However, once in a great while you read a story or see a video of some the young adult that understands the bigger world around them. In sports this is all too often forgotten,there are only WINNERS and second place is only the first place loser. I played several sports in high school and always considered myself athletic, but I too was only concerned with victories.\n\nPlease take a look at the amazing selflessness of a 12/13-year-old wrestler (I started wrestling at the age of nine) and I dare you not to feel some emotions.\"You Can Do Anything You Want\"will remind us all that there is more to athletics than just winning and losing.\n\nSpring is just around the corner, my wheels are itching for green grass!","numcomments":0,"author":"John","author_s":"http://thisability.areavoices.com/author/tetravet/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-03-10T15:27:38Z","displaydate":"2013-03-10 09:27:38","displaymodified":"2013-03-10 09:27:38","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Just Something to Share","As I'm getting older the follies of the younger generation become more and more irritating and no doubt that my parents felt the same as us kids grew into adulthood. However, once in a great while you read a story or see a video of some the young adult that understands the bigger world around them. In sports this is all too often forgotten,there are only WINNERS and second place is only the first place loser. I played several sports in high school and always considered myself athletic, but I too was only concerned with victories.\n\nPlease take a look at the amazing selflessness of a 12/13-year-old wrestler (I started wrestling at the age of nine) and I dare you not to feel some emotions. \"You Can Do Anything You Want\" will remind us all that there is more to athletics than just winning and losing.\n\nSpring is just around the corner, my wheels are itching for green grass!","John"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:notalonemom.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":165,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"notalonemom.areavoices.com/1065","permalink":"http://notalonemom.areavoices.com/2013/10/22/moms-arise-promo-video/","blogid":"26752","blogdomain":"notalonemom.areavoices.com","hostname":"notalonemom.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"ARISE Conference Promo Video October 2013","content":"We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","rawcontent":"We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Kristen L. Nelson","author_s":"http://notalonemom.areavoices.com/author/klnelson/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-10-22T15:08:06Z","displaydate":"2013-10-22 09:08:06","displaymodified":"2013-10-22 09:10:42","tags":["ARISE Conference","SheSays"],"categories":["Krissy Nelson","News","SheSays"],"spell":["ARISE Conference Promo Video October 2013","We're almost there!!\nDon't forget - you can LIVE STREAM the event right where you are at!! There are even prizes to be had for #ARISEmoms Home Parties click HERE for more details.\n\n\n\n","Kristen L. Nelson"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:lindusconstruction.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":203,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"lindusconstruction.areavoices.com/2007","permalink":"http://lindusconstruction.areavoices.com/2014/07/16/wallpaper-making-a-comeback-in-2014/","blogid":"27561","blogdomain":"lindusconstruction.areavoices.com","hostname":"lindusconstruction.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Wallpaper...Making a Comeback in 2014","content":"Rumors have been circulating since last week, that after twenty years, Pink Floyd may be teaming up for a new album, which is being cited as one of the biggest come backs of the year.  In the world of interior design, there’s another home feature making a comeback…wallpaper.  Believe it or not, this material that homeowners have a love/hate relationship with is back in the good graces of many interior decorators.  Like all resurging trends, it’s best to know how to work it in the present day so you don’t look like you’re stuck in a time capsule.\n\nCommitment: Bear in mind that wallpaper is more time-consuming to change out than paint.   Be sure you love the design you’re opting for so you don’t experience buyer’s remorse.  If the thought of an entire room of wallpaper doesn’t appeal to you, it’s perfectly acceptable to apply wallpaper to a single accent wall.  This concept works especially well in bedrooms where you can wallpaper the wall behind your headboard and then paint the other walls a calming, complimentary color.\n\nRoom Size: Just as in the case with paint, it’s important to consider room size before committing to color and pattern.  In smaller spaces, it’s best to opt for lighter colors in larger prints, which deflect the room’s smallness.  Applying wallpaper to a hallway or inside a closet can add interest that otherwise wouldn’t be there.  Check for remnants for smaller projects which can save you money.  Hanging wallpaper on the ceiling, and painting the rest of the room a similar color, is another trend.\n\nPrint Pattern:  Love small prints?  They work well in larger rooms.  Larger prints work better in small spaces because they trick the eye in believing the room is larger than it is.  Another trip to making a small room look larger is wallpaper with a horizontal pattern. A room that has a low ceiling can benefit from wallpaper with a vertical striped pattern because it will elongate the space.  Bold, rigid patterns add zing to a room,while lines with soft patterns evoke a sense of calmness.\n\nAvoid These Rookie Application Mistakes:\n\n\tNot lining up the pattern correctly so it’s easily visible where one roll starts and another ends.\n\tApplying wallpaper directly to drywall which will cause damage to the wall when it’s time to remove the wallpaper.\n\tPlacing a pattern upside down.\n\nNOW THROUGH THE END OF JULY, SAVE 50% OFF LABOR ON LEAFGUARD GUTTERS, GAF ASPHALT ROOFING & SEASONGUARD WINDOWS.  CALL US AT 800.873.1451 FOR A FREE, NO-OBLIGATION ESTIMATE.","rawcontent":"Rumors have been circulating since last week, that after twenty years, Pink Floyd may be teaming up for a new album, which is being cited as one of the biggest come backs of the year. In the world of interior design, theres another home feature making a comebackwallpaper. Believe it or not, this material that homeowners have a love/hate relationship with is back in the good graces of many interior decorators. Like all resurging trends, its best to know how to work it in the present day so you dont look like youre stuck in a time capsule.\n\nCommitment: Bear in mind that wallpaper is more time-consuming to change out than paint. Be sure you love the design youre opting for so you dont experience buyers remorse. If the thought of an entire room of wallpaper doesnt appeal to you, its perfectly acceptable to apply wallpaper to a single accent wall. This concept works especially well in bedrooms where you can wallpaper the wall behind your headboard and then paint the other walls a calming, complimentary color.\n\nRoom Size: Just as in the case with paint, its important to consider room size before committing to color and pattern. In smaller spaces, its best to opt for lighter colors in larger prints, which deflect the rooms smallness. Applying wallpaper to a hallway or inside a closet can add interest that otherwise wouldnt be there. Check for remnants for smaller projects which can save you money. Hanging wallpaper on the ceiling, and painting the rest of the room a similar color, is another trend.\n\nPrint Pattern: Love small prints? They work well in larger rooms. Larger prints work better in small spaces because they trick the eye in believing the room is larger than it is. Another trip to making a small room look larger is wallpaper with a horizontal pattern. A room that has a low ceiling can benefit from wallpaper with a vertical striped pattern because it will elongate the space. Bold, rigid patterns add zing to a room,while lines with soft patterns evoke a sense of calmness.\n\nAvoid These Rookie Application Mistakes:\n\nNot lining up the pattern correctly so its easily visible where one roll starts and another ends.\nApplying wallpaper directly to drywall which will cause damage to the wall when its time to remove the wallpaper.\nPlacing a pattern upside down.\n\nNOW THROUGH THE END OF JULY, SAVE 50% OFF LABOR ON LEAFGUARD GUTTERS, GAF ASPHALT ROOFING & SEASONGUARD WINDOWS. CALL US AT 800.873.1451 FOR A FREE, NO-OBLIGATION ESTIMATE.","contentnoshortcodes":"Rumors have been circulating since last week, that after twenty years, Pink Floyd may be teaming up for a new album, which is being cited as one of the biggest come backs of the year. In the world of interior design, theres another home feature making a comebackwallpaper. Believe it or not, this material that homeowners have a love/hate relationship with is back in the good graces of many interior decorators. Like all resurging trends, its best to know how to work it in the present day so you dont look like youre stuck in a time capsule.\n\nCommitment: Bear in mind that wallpaper is more time-consuming to change out than paint. Be sure you love the design youre opting for so you dont experience buyers remorse. If the thought of an entire room of wallpaper doesnt appeal to you, its perfectly acceptable to apply wallpaper to a single accent wall. This concept works especially well in bedrooms where you can wallpaper the wall behind your headboard and then paint the other walls a calming, complimentary color.\n\nRoom Size: Just as in the case with paint, its important to consider room size before committing to color and pattern. In smaller spaces, its best to opt for lighter colors in larger prints, which deflect the rooms smallness. Applying wallpaper to a hallway or inside a closet can add interest that otherwise wouldnt be there. Check for remnants for smaller projects which can save you money. Hanging wallpaper on the ceiling, and painting the rest of the room a similar color, is another trend.\n\nPrint Pattern: Love small prints? They work well in larger rooms. Larger prints work better in small spaces because they trick the eye in believing the room is larger than it is. Another trip to making a small room look larger is wallpaper with a horizontal pattern. A room that has a low ceiling can benefit from wallpaper with a vertical striped pattern because it will elongate the space. Bold, rigid patterns add zing to a room,while lines with soft patterns evoke a sense of calmness.\n\nAvoid These Rookie Application Mistakes:\n\nNot lining up the pattern correctly so its easily visible where one roll starts and another ends.\nApplying wallpaper directly to drywall which will cause damage to the wall when its time to remove the wallpaper.\nPlacing a pattern upside down.\n\nNOW THROUGH THE END OF JULY, SAVE 50% OFF LABOR ON LEAFGUARD GUTTERS, GAF ASPHALT ROOFING & SEASONGUARD WINDOWS. CALL US AT 800.873.1451 FOR A FREE, NO-OBLIGATION ESTIMATE.","numcomments":0,"author":"Andy Lindus","author_s":"http://lindusconstruction.areavoices.com/author/lindusconstruction/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-16T15:26:14Z","displaydate":"2014-07-16 15:26:14","displaymodified":"2014-07-16 15:26:14","tags":["Twin Cities Home Improvement"],"categories":["Home Decor"],"spell":["Wallpaper...Making a Comeback in 2014","Rumors have been circulating since last week, that after twenty years, Pink Floyd may be teaming up for a new album, which is being cited as one of the biggest come backs of the year.  In the world of interior design, there’s another home feature making a comeback…wallpaper.  Believe it or not, this material that homeowners have a love/hate relationship with is back in the good graces of many interior decorators.  Like all resurging trends, it’s best to know how to work it in the present day so you don’t look like you’re stuck in a time capsule.\n\nCommitment: Bear in mind that wallpaper is more time-consuming to change out than paint.   Be sure you love the design you’re opting for so you don’t experience buyer’s remorse.  If the thought of an entire room of wallpaper doesn’t appeal to you, it’s perfectly acceptable to apply wallpaper to a single accent wall.  This concept works especially well in bedrooms where you can wallpaper the wall behind your headboard and then paint the other walls a calming, complimentary color.\n\nRoom Size: Just as in the case with paint, it’s important to consider room size before committing to color and pattern.  In smaller spaces, it’s best to opt for lighter colors in larger prints, which deflect the room’s smallness.  Applying wallpaper to a hallway or inside a closet can add interest that otherwise wouldn’t be there.  Check for remnants for smaller projects which can save you money.  Hanging wallpaper on the ceiling, and painting the rest of the room a similar color, is another trend.\n\nPrint Pattern:  Love small prints?  They work well in larger rooms.  Larger prints work better in small spaces because they trick the eye in believing the room is larger than it is.  Another trip to making a small room look larger is wallpaper with a horizontal pattern. A room that has a low ceiling can benefit from wallpaper with a vertical striped pattern because it will elongate the space.  Bold, rigid patterns add zing to a room,while lines with soft patterns evoke a sense of calmness.\n\nAvoid These Rookie Application Mistakes:\n\n\tNot lining up the pattern correctly so it’s easily visible where one roll starts and another ends.\n\tApplying wallpaper directly to drywall which will cause damage to the wall when it’s time to remove the wallpaper.\n\tPlacing a pattern upside down.\n\nNOW THROUGH THE END OF JULY, SAVE 50% OFF LABOR ON LEAFGUARD GUTTERS, GAF ASPHALT ROOFING & SEASONGUARD WINDOWS.  CALL US AT 800.873.1451 FOR A FREE, NO-OBLIGATION ESTIMATE.","Andy Lindus"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:sweetconclusions.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":346,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"sweetconclusions.areavoices.com/4566","permalink":"http://sweetconclusions.areavoices.com/2014/07/22/ring-of-fire/","blogid":"26740","blogdomain":"sweetconclusions.areavoices.com","hostname":"sweetconclusions.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Ring of Fire!","content":"We attended the traveling Broadway show Ring of Fire at the Plymouth Playhouse in Plymouth, Minnesota.\n\n The musical started the same way Johnny started his concerts with a simple,  \"Hello, I'm Johnny Cash.\"\n\nJohn R. \"Johnny\" Cash (February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was a singer-songwriter, actor, and author, widely considered one of the most influential American musicians of the 20th century.   \n\nRing of Fire captures Johnny and his music.   From his boyhood years to the Grand Ole Opry and fame, to his dark years. The show ends with redemption and celebration of his life.\n\nWe thought the show was fantastic and highly recommend it.\n\n We decided to watch the American biographical musical drama film, Walk the Line, last evening and enjoyed that also.                         The Johnny Cash Signature USA Postal Stamp was released in 2013 \n  Making for a great keepsake.\nUntil next time with more Sweet Conclusions ...\nGavin & Rosie\n ","rawcontent":"We attended the traveling Broadway show Ring of Fire at the Plymouth Playhouse in Plymouth, Minnesota.\n\n The musical started the same way Johnny started his concerts with a simple, \"Hello, I'm Johnny Cash.\"\n\nJohn R. \"Johnny\" Cash (February 26, 1932 September 12, 2003) was a singer-songwriter, actor, and author, widely considered one of the most influential American musicians of the 20th century. \n\nRing of Fire captures Johnny and his music. From his boyhood years to the Grand Ole Opry and fame, to his dark years. The show ends with redemption and celebration of his life.\n\nWe thought the show was fantastic and highly recommend it.\n\n We decided to watch the American biographical musical drama film, Walk the Line, last evening and enjoyed that also. The Johnny Cash Signature USA Postal Stamp was released in 2013 \n Making for a great keepsake.\nUntil next time with more Sweet Conclusions ...\nGavin & Rosie\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"We attended the traveling Broadway show Ring of Fire at the Plymouth Playhouse in Plymouth, Minnesota.\n\n The musical started the same way Johnny started his concerts with a simple, \"Hello, I'm Johnny Cash.\"\n\nJohn R. \"Johnny\" Cash (February 26, 1932 September 12, 2003) was a singer-songwriter, actor, and author, widely considered one of the most influential American musicians of the 20th century. \n\nRing of Fire captures Johnny and his music. From his boyhood years to the Grand Ole Opry and fame, to his dark years. The show ends with redemption and celebration of his life.\n\nWe thought the show was fantastic and highly recommend it.\n\n We decided to watch the American biographical musical drama film, Walk the Line, last evening and enjoyed that also. The Johnny Cash Signature USA Postal Stamp was released in 2013 \n Making for a great keepsake.\nUntil next time with more Sweet Conclusions ...\nGavin & Rosie\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Gavin and Rosie","author_s":"http://sweetconclusions.areavoices.com/author/sweetconclusions/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-22T17:17:55Z","displaydate":"2014-07-22 12:17:55","displaymodified":"2014-07-22 12:17:55","tags":["Johnny Cash","Plymouth Playhouse","Sweet Conclusions","Time out with Gavin and Rosie","Walk the Line"],"categories":["Sweet Conclusions"],"spell":["Ring of Fire!","We attended the traveling Broadway show Ring of Fire at the Plymouth Playhouse in Plymouth, Minnesota.\n\n The musical started the same way Johnny started his concerts with a simple,  \"Hello, I'm Johnny Cash.\"\n\nJohn R. \"Johnny\" Cash (February 26, 1932 – September 12, 2003) was a singer-songwriter, actor, and author, widely considered one of the most influential American musicians of the 20th century.   \n\nRing of Fire captures Johnny and his music.   From his boyhood years to the Grand Ole Opry and fame, to his dark years. The show ends with redemption and celebration of his life.\n\nWe thought the show was fantastic and highly recommend it.\n\n We decided to watch the American biographical musical drama film, Walk the Line, last evening and enjoyed that also.                         The Johnny Cash Signature USA Postal Stamp was released in 2013 \n  Making for a great keepsake.\nUntil next time with more Sweet Conclusions ...\nGavin & Rosie\n ","Gavin and Rosie"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:whenchildrendobetter.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":2,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"whenchildrendobetter.areavoices.com/43","permalink":"http://whenchildrendobetter.areavoices.com/2012/04/24/week-of-the-young-child-april-22-28th/","blogid":"26824","blogdomain":"whenchildrendobetter.areavoices.com","hostname":"whenchildrendobetter.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Week of the Young Child April 22-28th","content":"The 2012 Week of the Young Child™ is April 22–28 and the theme is Early Years Are Learning Years®.\n\nThe national celebration is sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the world's largest early childhood education association.\n\nThe purpose of the Week of the Young Child™ is to focus public attention on the needs of young children and their families and to recognize the early childhood programs and services that meet those needs.\n\nNAEYC first established the Week of the Young Child™ in 1971, recognizing that the early childhood years (birth through age eight) lay the foundation for children's success in school and later life. The Week of the Young Child™ is a time to plan how we—as citizens of a community, of a state, and of a nation—will better meet the needs of all young children and their families.\n\nIn communities around the state and nation, there will be events and activities that celebrate young children and the ways in which we can help them grow to be healthy, happy, productive adults.  The foundation for successful adults is truly laid in the youngest years of life.\n\nA great resource for tips about parenting is : http://www.parentsknow.state.mn.us/parentsknow/index.html\n\nThe site was developed by the Minnesota Department of Education.  There is information on child development and parenting of all children, birth to 18.  Check it out for yourself!\n\nThere is also a Facebook page, which will have special giveaways and tips to promote learning in early childhood during the  2012 Week of the Young Child™.\n\nhttps://www.facebook.com/?ref=tn_tnmn#!/Parentsknow\n\nGo over and like their page to learn more!\n\nUntil next time: When we help children do better, we all do better! ~PCAMN\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"The 2012 Week of the Young Child is April 2228 and the theme is Early Years Are Learning Years.\n\nThe national celebration is sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the world's largest early childhood education association.\n\nThe purpose of the Week of the Young Child is to focus public attention on the needs of young children and their families and to recognize the early childhood programs and services that meet those needs.\n\nNAEYC first established the Week of the Young Child in 1971, recognizing that the early childhood years (birth through age eight) lay the foundation for children's success in school and later life. The Week of the Young Child is a time to plan how weas citizens of a community, of a state, and of a nationwill better meet the needs of all young children and their families.\n\nIn communities around the state and nation, there will be events and activities that celebrate young children and the ways in which we can help them grow to be healthy, happy, productive adults. The foundation for successful adults is truly laid in the youngest years of life.\n\nA great resource for tips about parenting is : http://www.parentsknow.state.mn.us/parentsknow/index.html\n\nThe site was developed by the Minnesota Department of Education. There is information on child development and parenting of all children, birth to 18. Check it out for yourself!\n\nThere is also a Facebook page, which will have special giveaways and tips to promote learning in early childhood during the 2012 Week of the Young Child.\n\nhttps://www.facebook.com/?ref=tn_tnmn#!/Parentsknow\n\nGo over and like their page to learn more!\n\nUntil next time: When we help children do better, we all do better! ~PCAMN\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"The 2012 Week of the Young Child is April 2228 and the theme is Early Years Are Learning Years.\n\nThe national celebration is sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the world's largest early childhood education association.\n\nThe purpose of the Week of the Young Child is to focus public attention on the needs of young children and their families and to recognize the early childhood programs and services that meet those needs.\n\nNAEYC first established the Week of the Young Child in 1971, recognizing that the early childhood years (birth through age eight) lay the foundation for children's success in school and later life. The Week of the Young Child is a time to plan how weas citizens of a community, of a state, and of a nationwill better meet the needs of all young children and their families.\n\nIn communities around the state and nation, there will be events and activities that celebrate young children and the ways in which we can help them grow to be healthy, happy, productive adults. The foundation for successful adults is truly laid in the youngest years of life.\n\nA great resource for tips about parenting is : http://www.parentsknow.state.mn.us/parentsknow/index.html\n\nThe site was developed by the Minnesota Department of Education. There is information on child development and parenting of all children, birth to 18. Check it out for yourself!\n\nThere is also a Facebook page, which will have special giveaways and tips to promote learning in early childhood during the 2012 Week of the Young Child.\n\nhttps://www.facebook.com/?ref=tn_tnmn#!/Parentsknow\n\nGo over and like their page to learn more!\n\nUntil next time: When we help children do better, we all do better! ~PCAMN\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Susan Thomes","author_s":"http://whenchildrendobetter.areavoices.com/author/sthomes/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-04-25T03:23:40Z","displaydate":"2012-04-24 22:23:40","displaymodified":"2012-04-24 22:23:40","categories":["Early Childhood","Parenting Tips"],"spell":["Week of the Young Child April 22-28th","The 2012 Week of the Young Child™ is April 22–28 and the theme is Early Years Are Learning Years®.\n\nThe national celebration is sponsored by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), the world's largest early childhood education association.\n\nThe purpose of the Week of the Young Child™ is to focus public attention on the needs of young children and their families and to recognize the early childhood programs and services that meet those needs.\n\nNAEYC first established the Week of the Young Child™ in 1971, recognizing that the early childhood years (birth through age eight) lay the foundation for children's success in school and later life. The Week of the Young Child™ is a time to plan how we—as citizens of a community, of a state, and of a nation—will better meet the needs of all young children and their families.\n\nIn communities around the state and nation, there will be events and activities that celebrate young children and the ways in which we can help them grow to be healthy, happy, productive adults.  The foundation for successful adults is truly laid in the youngest years of life.\n\nA great resource for tips about parenting is : http://www.parentsknow.state.mn.us/parentsknow/index.html\n\nThe site was developed by the Minnesota Department of Education.  There is information on child development and parenting of all children, birth to 18.  Check it out for yourself!\n\nThere is also a Facebook page, which will have special giveaways and tips to promote learning in early childhood during the  2012 Week of the Young Child™.\n\nhttps://www.facebook.com/?ref=tn_tnmn#!/Parentsknow\n\nGo over and like their page to learn more!\n\nUntil next time: When we help children do better, we all do better! ~PCAMN\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","Susan Thomes"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:schooloffish.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:icardinalscampaign.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":19,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"icardinalscampaign.areavoices.com/275","permalink":"http://icardinalscampaign.areavoices.com/2013/03/09/willmar-minn-senior-high-has-seen-major-changes-due-to-ipads/","blogid":"28540","blogdomain":"icardinalscampaign.areavoices.com","hostname":"icardinalscampaign.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Willmar, Minn., Senior High has seen major changes due to iPads","content":"LINDA VANDERWERF\nWEST CENTRAL TRIBUNE\nFRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013 - 11:06PM\n \n\nWILLMAR — The social studies department at Willmar Senior High makes about 3,000 copies a month now. A year ago, that number was 20,000.  The primary reason for that 85 percent drop? iPads.\n\nWillmar started the school year by issuing an Apple iPad tablet computer to every junior and senior in the school.  The district went from a half dozen iPads a couple years ago to more than 1,700 across the district this year.   The district is in its third year of working with iPads. Faculty learned to use the tablets first and looked at ways of using them in classes.  Then, the local business community got involved in December 2011 when former Principal Rob Anderson said he’d like to see all juniors and seniors have iPads by the following fall.   Other school officials were surprised by the statement, but the business community took it to heart and started raising money.  More than $300,000 were raised for the effort, and the school used its capital equipment fund to match it.\n\nThere were a few “hiccups” with the hardware at the beginning, when 600 iPads were turned on that first day of school, said social studies teacher Lyle Hovland, one of the leaders of the iPad initiative’s development.  There were some issues with the speed of the network in September, but they were fixed quickly, said Tyler Gehrking, another social studies teacher. Halfway through the school year, the school has noted about a dozen cracked screens and one lost iPad. The student’s family paid for a replacement.\n\nThere was never a problem in getting the teenage digital natives to use the new technology.  Senior High Principal Paul Schmitz said he’s seen many benefits for students and the school.  Assignments are given and turned in electronically, accounting for the dramatic decrease in paper use in the building. Tests are taken electronically, too. “We still need paper for some resources, but it’s always nice to see a reduction,”\n\nHovland said.  The iPads have helped kids with special needs find new ways to communicate and participate in classes. Choir music is stored on iPads. Art students develop graphic projects or find ideas online.\n\nThe faculty formed committees to share ideas and apps that are useful for classes. Each teacher has his or her own strategies.  “We are allowing teachers to use the tools that work best for them in their discipline,” Schmitz said, adding that teachers are the ones who have made the transition work so well.  “Every department is on board with going forward,” he said.  The social studies department is ahead of some of the others, because it just completed its periodic curriculum review. Rather than  spending more than $80,000 on books, the district spent about $16,000 to pay staff members to write digital textbooks for the department.  The Willmar teachers can tailor their books for their classes and to address state standards. The books can be updated as needed.  Writing the books has led to more collaboration between teachers and in departments, too, Schmitz said. Curriculum reviews are done on a rotating schedule, with one or two departments reviewing curriculum and teaching materials each year. As the schedule moves along, other departments will be writing their own books.  The science and health/physical education departments are in the process of writing iBooks this year.\n\nSchmitz said students can lose their iPad privileges if they misuse them or download inappropriate material. So far, there’s been little problem with that.  Having the iPads around has led to many conversations about distractibility and proper uses of social media, Schmitz said.  “Multitasking is overrated,” he added. “Kids need to learn how to focus on one thing at a time; it’s a life skill the kids need to learn.”  For many students and their families, the iPad from school is the first computer in their home.  Hovland said he’s heard of students showing younger siblings how to use the iPad while they do homework together.\n\nThe iPads contain everything students need to complete assignments, so they don’t need internet access outside school.   At an update for the Willmar School Board this winter, Superintendent Jerry Kjergaard said the anticipated savings have come quickly. “The high school has bought into this much faster than any of us expected,” he said. “It’s an amazing switch for how they teach and what they teach.”  Kjergaard also warned the board that the district will be on a digital path from now on and will need to plan for eventual replacement costs. “We can never go back.”","rawcontent":"LINDA VANDERWERF\nWEST CENTRAL TRIBUNE\nFRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013 - 11:06PM\n \n\nWILLMAR The social studies department at Willmar Senior High makes about 3,000 copies a month now. A year ago, that number was 20,000. The primary reason for that 85 percent drop? iPads.\n\nWillmar started the school year by issuing an Apple iPad tablet computer to every junior and senior in the school. The district went from a half dozen iPads a couple years ago to more than 1,700 across the district this year. The district is in its third year of working with iPads. Faculty learned to use the tablets first and looked at ways of using them in classes. Then, the local business community got involved in December 2011 when former Principal Rob Anderson said hed like to see all juniors and seniors have iPads by the following fall. Other school officials were surprised by the statement, but the business community took it to heart and started raising money. More than $300,000 were raised for the effort, and the school used its capital equipment fund to match it.\n\nThere were a few hiccups with the hardware at the beginning, when 600 iPads were turned on that first day of school, said social studies teacher Lyle Hovland, one of the leaders of the iPad initiatives development. There were some issues with the speed of the network in September, but they were fixed quickly, said Tyler Gehrking, another social studies teacher. Halfway through the school year, the school has noted about a dozen cracked screens and one lost iPad. The students family paid for a replacement.\n\nThere was never a problem in getting the teenage digital natives to use the new technology. Senior High Principal Paul Schmitz said hes seen many benefits for students and the school. Assignments are given and turned in electronically, accounting for the dramatic decrease in paper use in the building. Tests are taken electronically, too. We still need paper for some resources, but its always nice to see a reduction,\n\nHovland said. The iPads have helped kids with special needs find new ways to communicate and participate in classes. Choir music is stored on iPads. Art students develop graphic projects or find ideas online.\n\nThe faculty formed committees to share ideas and apps that are useful for classes. Each teacher has his or her own strategies. We are allowing teachers to use the tools that work best for them in their discipline, Schmitz said, adding that teachers are the ones who have made the transition work so well. Every department is on board with going forward, he said. The social studies department is ahead of some of the others, because it just completed its periodic curriculum review. Rather than spending more than $80,000 on books, the district spent about $16,000 to pay staff members to write digital textbooks for the department. The Willmar teachers can tailor their books for their classes and to address state standards. The books can be updated as needed. Writing the books has led to more collaboration between teachers and in departments, too, Schmitz said. Curriculum reviews are done on a rotating schedule, with one or two departments reviewing curriculum and teaching materials each year. As the schedule moves along, other departments will be writing their own books. The science and health/physical education departments are in the process of writing iBooks this year.\n\nSchmitz said students can lose their iPad privileges if they misuse them or download inappropriate material. So far, theres been little problem with that. Having the iPads around has led to many conversations about distractibility and proper uses of social media, Schmitz said. Multitasking is overrated, he added. Kids need to learn how to focus on one thing at a time; its a life skill the kids need to learn. For many students and their families, the iPad from school is the first computer in their home. Hovland said hes heard of students showing younger siblings how to use the iPad while they do homework together.\n\nThe iPads contain everything students need to complete assignments, so they dont need internet access outside school. At an update for the Willmar School Board this winter, Superintendent Jerry Kjergaard said the anticipated savings have come quickly. The high school has bought into this much faster than any of us expected, he said. Its an amazing switch for how they teach and what they teach. Kjergaard also warned the board that the district will be on a digital path from now on and will need to plan for eventual replacement costs. We can never go back.","contentnoshortcodes":"LINDA VANDERWERF\nWEST CENTRAL TRIBUNE\nFRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013 - 11:06PM\n \n\nWILLMAR The social studies department at Willmar Senior High makes about 3,000 copies a month now. A year ago, that number was 20,000. The primary reason for that 85 percent drop? iPads.\n\nWillmar started the school year by issuing an Apple iPad tablet computer to every junior and senior in the school. The district went from a half dozen iPads a couple years ago to more than 1,700 across the district this year. The district is in its third year of working with iPads. Faculty learned to use the tablets first and looked at ways of using them in classes. Then, the local business community got involved in December 2011 when former Principal Rob Anderson said hed like to see all juniors and seniors have iPads by the following fall. Other school officials were surprised by the statement, but the business community took it to heart and started raising money. More than $300,000 were raised for the effort, and the school used its capital equipment fund to match it.\n\nThere were a few hiccups with the hardware at the beginning, when 600 iPads were turned on that first day of school, said social studies teacher Lyle Hovland, one of the leaders of the iPad initiatives development. There were some issues with the speed of the network in September, but they were fixed quickly, said Tyler Gehrking, another social studies teacher. Halfway through the school year, the school has noted about a dozen cracked screens and one lost iPad. The students family paid for a replacement.\n\nThere was never a problem in getting the teenage digital natives to use the new technology. Senior High Principal Paul Schmitz said hes seen many benefits for students and the school. Assignments are given and turned in electronically, accounting for the dramatic decrease in paper use in the building. Tests are taken electronically, too. We still need paper for some resources, but its always nice to see a reduction,\n\nHovland said. The iPads have helped kids with special needs find new ways to communicate and participate in classes. Choir music is stored on iPads. Art students develop graphic projects or find ideas online.\n\nThe faculty formed committees to share ideas and apps that are useful for classes. Each teacher has his or her own strategies. We are allowing teachers to use the tools that work best for them in their discipline, Schmitz said, adding that teachers are the ones who have made the transition work so well. Every department is on board with going forward, he said. The social studies department is ahead of some of the others, because it just completed its periodic curriculum review. Rather than spending more than $80,000 on books, the district spent about $16,000 to pay staff members to write digital textbooks for the department. The Willmar teachers can tailor their books for their classes and to address state standards. The books can be updated as needed. Writing the books has led to more collaboration between teachers and in departments, too, Schmitz said. Curriculum reviews are done on a rotating schedule, with one or two departments reviewing curriculum and teaching materials each year. As the schedule moves along, other departments will be writing their own books. The science and health/physical education departments are in the process of writing iBooks this year.\n\nSchmitz said students can lose their iPad privileges if they misuse them or download inappropriate material. So far, theres been little problem with that. Having the iPads around has led to many conversations about distractibility and proper uses of social media, Schmitz said. Multitasking is overrated, he added. Kids need to learn how to focus on one thing at a time; its a life skill the kids need to learn. For many students and their families, the iPad from school is the first computer in their home. Hovland said hes heard of students showing younger siblings how to use the iPad while they do homework together.\n\nThe iPads contain everything students need to complete assignments, so they dont need internet access outside school. At an update for the Willmar School Board this winter, Superintendent Jerry Kjergaard said the anticipated savings have come quickly. The high school has bought into this much faster than any of us expected, he said. Its an amazing switch for how they teach and what they teach. Kjergaard also warned the board that the district will be on a digital path from now on and will need to plan for eventual replacement costs. We can never go back.","numcomments":0,"author":"Mike Tolbert","author_s":"http://icardinalscampaign.areavoices.com/author/miketolbert/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-03-09T18:41:37Z","displaydate":"2013-03-09 18:41:37","displaymodified":"2013-03-09 18:41:37","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["Willmar, Minn., Senior High has seen major changes due to iPads","LINDA VANDERWERF\nWEST CENTRAL TRIBUNE\nFRIDAY, MARCH 8, 2013 - 11:06PM\n \n\nWILLMAR — The social studies department at Willmar Senior High makes about 3,000 copies a month now. A year ago, that number was 20,000.  The primary reason for that 85 percent drop? iPads.\n\nWillmar started the school year by issuing an Apple iPad tablet computer to every junior and senior in the school.  The district went from a half dozen iPads a couple years ago to more than 1,700 across the district this year.   The district is in its third year of working with iPads. Faculty learned to use the tablets first and looked at ways of using them in classes.  Then, the local business community got involved in December 2011 when former Principal Rob Anderson said he’d like to see all juniors and seniors have iPads by the following fall.   Other school officials were surprised by the statement, but the business community took it to heart and started raising money.  More than $300,000 were raised for the effort, and the school used its capital equipment fund to match it.\n\nThere were a few “hiccups” with the hardware at the beginning, when 600 iPads were turned on that first day of school, said social studies teacher Lyle Hovland, one of the leaders of the iPad initiative’s development.  There were some issues with the speed of the network in September, but they were fixed quickly, said Tyler Gehrking, another social studies teacher. Halfway through the school year, the school has noted about a dozen cracked screens and one lost iPad. The student’s family paid for a replacement.\n\nThere was never a problem in getting the teenage digital natives to use the new technology.  Senior High Principal Paul Schmitz said he’s seen many benefits for students and the school.  Assignments are given and turned in electronically, accounting for the dramatic decrease in paper use in the building. Tests are taken electronically, too. “We still need paper for some resources, but it’s always nice to see a reduction,”\n\nHovland said.  The iPads have helped kids with special needs find new ways to communicate and participate in classes. Choir music is stored on iPads. Art students develop graphic projects or find ideas online.\n\nThe faculty formed committees to share ideas and apps that are useful for classes. Each teacher has his or her own strategies.  “We are allowing teachers to use the tools that work best for them in their discipline,” Schmitz said, adding that teachers are the ones who have made the transition work so well.  “Every department is on board with going forward,” he said.  The social studies department is ahead of some of the others, because it just completed its periodic curriculum review. Rather than  spending more than $80,000 on books, the district spent about $16,000 to pay staff members to write digital textbooks for the department.  The Willmar teachers can tailor their books for their classes and to address state standards. The books can be updated as needed.  Writing the books has led to more collaboration between teachers and in departments, too, Schmitz said. Curriculum reviews are done on a rotating schedule, with one or two departments reviewing curriculum and teaching materials each year. As the schedule moves along, other departments will be writing their own books.  The science and health/physical education departments are in the process of writing iBooks this year.\n\nSchmitz said students can lose their iPad privileges if they misuse them or download inappropriate material. So far, there’s been little problem with that.  Having the iPads around has led to many conversations about distractibility and proper uses of social media, Schmitz said.  “Multitasking is overrated,” he added. “Kids need to learn how to focus on one thing at a time; it’s a life skill the kids need to learn.”  For many students and their families, the iPad from school is the first computer in their home.  Hovland said he’s heard of students showing younger siblings how to use the iPad while they do homework together.\n\nThe iPads contain everything students need to complete assignments, so they don’t need internet access outside school.   At an update for the Willmar School Board this winter, Superintendent Jerry Kjergaard said the anticipated savings have come quickly. “The high school has bought into this much faster than any of us expected,” he said. “It’s an amazing switch for how they teach and what they teach.”  Kjergaard also warned the board that the district will be on a digital path from now on and will need to plan for eventual replacement costs. “We can never go back.”","Mike Tolbert"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:atozletterpress.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:willmarkiwanis.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":33,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"willmarkiwanis.areavoices.com/12","permalink":"http://willmarkiwanis.areavoices.com/notes-from-our-president-2/","blogid":"28225","blogdomain":"willmarkiwanis.areavoices.com","hostname":"willmarkiwanis.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Notes from our President","content":"One of our clubs new service projects is to assist the United Way’s Growmobile with their summer reading program on each Friday at the local parks.  We read to the children and at the end of our visit they each receive a backpack with food supplied from the food shelf to help their family get through the weekend.  I have already read one Friday and the children are so excited when they see the Growmobile pull into their park.  If you haven’t yet volunteered to read, contact me if you are able.  It is a very rewarding experience!\nOur club will be selling Brats at Cash Wise on Friday the 25th and Saturday the 26th to raise money for The Eliminate Project.  Please sign up as we need three volunteers for every 2 hour shift.\nThe MN-DAK district convention is in Minnetonka on August 8-10th this year.  Many interesting forums will be available for us to learn more about being a Kiwanian!  There will be a hands-on service projects and we will be collecting diapers for a local shelter for women and children.  A silent auction will be held to raise some money for The Eliminate project!  If you can take part in the convention, please let me know.\nWishing you a wonderful Independence Day!\n\nMaribeth Williamson","rawcontent":"One of our clubs new service projects is to assist the United Ways Growmobile with their summer reading program on each Friday at the local parks. We read to the children and at the end of our visit they each receive a backpack with food supplied from the food shelf to help their family get through the weekend. I have already read one Friday and the children are so excited when they see the Growmobile pull into their park. If you havent yet volunteered to read, contact me if you are able. It is a very rewarding experience!\nOur club will be selling Brats at Cash Wise on Friday the 25th and Saturday the 26th to raise money for The Eliminate Project. Please sign up as we need three volunteers for every 2 hour shift.\nThe MN-DAK district convention is in Minnetonka on August 8-10th this year. Many interesting forums will be available for us to learn more about being a Kiwanian! There will be a hands-on service projects and we will be collecting diapers for a local shelter for women and children. A silent auction will be held to raise some money for The Eliminate project! If you can take part in the convention, please let me know.\nWishing you a wonderful Independence Day!\n\nMaribeth Williamson","contentnoshortcodes":"One of our clubs new service projects is to assist the United Ways Growmobile with their summer reading program on each Friday at the local parks. We read to the children and at the end of our visit they each receive a backpack with food supplied from the food shelf to help their family get through the weekend. I have already read one Friday and the children are so excited when they see the Growmobile pull into their park. If you havent yet volunteered to read, contact me if you are able. It is a very rewarding experience!\nOur club will be selling Brats at Cash Wise on Friday the 25th and Saturday the 26th to raise money for The Eliminate Project. Please sign up as we need three volunteers for every 2 hour shift.\nThe MN-DAK district convention is in Minnetonka on August 8-10th this year. Many interesting forums will be available for us to learn more about being a Kiwanian! There will be a hands-on service projects and we will be collecting diapers for a local shelter for women and children. A silent auction will be held to raise some money for The Eliminate project! If you can take part in the convention, please let me know.\nWishing you a wonderful Independence Day!\n\nMaribeth Williamson","numcomments":0,"author":"Willmar Kiwanis Club","author_s":"http://willmarkiwanis.areavoices.com/author/kiwanis/","type":"page","publishtime":"2014-07-14T22:00:10Z","displaydate":"2014-07-14 17:00:10","displaymodified":"2014-07-14 17:03:04","spell":["Notes from our President","One of our clubs new service projects is to assist the United Way’s Growmobile with their summer reading program on each Friday at the local parks.  We read to the children and at the end of our visit they each receive a backpack with food supplied from the food shelf to help their family get through the weekend.  I have already read one Friday and the children are so excited when they see the Growmobile pull into their park.  If you haven’t yet volunteered to read, contact me if you are able.  It is a very rewarding experience!\nOur club will be selling Brats at Cash Wise on Friday the 25th and Saturday the 26th to raise money for The Eliminate Project.  Please sign up as we need three volunteers for every 2 hour shift.\nThe MN-DAK district convention is in Minnetonka on August 8-10th this year.  Many interesting forums will be available for us to learn more about being a Kiwanian!  There will be a hands-on service projects and we will be collecting diapers for a local shelter for women and children.  A silent auction will be held to raise some money for The Eliminate project!  If you can take part in the convention, please let me know.\nWishing you a wonderful Independence Day!\n\nMaribeth Williamson","Willmar Kiwanis Club"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:safeavenues.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":4,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"safeavenues.areavoices.com/68","permalink":"http://safeavenues.areavoices.com/2013/05/10/exciting-news-on-pedal-for-project-impact/","blogid":"29403","blogdomain":"safeavenues.areavoices.com","hostname":"safeavenues.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Exciting news on Pedal for Project Impact!","content":"Great News….. interested bikers are invited to join in the beginning miles of the journey!   This adventure to help raise awareness and funds for Project Impact at Safe Avenues, is being held on June 3, 2013 at 7 am at the Glacial Lake State Trail (the trail head at the Willmar Civic Center).  Bob Hines and Gary Miller will complete a 450 mile ride!  You can follow their progress on the blog http://2wheeler.areavoices.com/2013/05/07/346/","rawcontent":"Great News.. interested bikers are invited to join in the beginning miles of the journey! This adventure to help raise awareness and funds for Project Impact at Safe Avenues, is being held on June 3, 2013 at 7 am at the Glacial Lake State Trail (the trail head at the Willmar Civic Center). Bob Hines and Gary Miller will complete a 450 mile ride! You can follow their progress on the blog http://2wheeler.areavoices.com/2013/05/07/346/","contentnoshortcodes":"Great News.. interested bikers are invited to join in the beginning miles of the journey! This adventure to help raise awareness and funds for Project Impact at Safe Avenues, is being held on June 3, 2013 at 7 am at the Glacial Lake State Trail (the trail head at the Willmar Civic Center). Bob Hines and Gary Miller will complete a 450 mile ride! You can follow their progress on the blog http://2wheeler.areavoices.com/2013/05/07/346/","numcomments":0,"author":"Safe Avenues","author_s":"http://safeavenues.areavoices.com/author/safeavenues/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-05-10T19:19:40Z","displaydate":"2013-05-10 14:19:40","displaymodified":"2013-05-10 15:17:44","tags":["2wheeler","bike","Glacial Lakes","journey","pedal","project impact","Safe Avenues"],"categories":["Pedal for Project Impact"],"spell":["Exciting news on Pedal for Project Impact!","Great News….. interested bikers are invited to join in the beginning miles of the journey!   This adventure to help raise awareness and funds for Project Impact at Safe Avenues, is being held on June 3, 2013 at 7 am at the Glacial Lake State Trail (the trail head at the Willmar Civic Center).  Bob Hines and Gary Miller will complete a 450 mile ride!  You can follow their progress on the blog http://2wheeler.areavoices.com/2013/05/07/346/","Safe Avenues"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:arckandi.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":25,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"arckandi.areavoices.com/186","permalink":"http://arckandi.areavoices.com/2012/12/23/its-all-about-me/","blogid":"26626","blogdomain":"arckandi.areavoices.com","hostname":"arckandi.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"It's All About Me","content":"I thought this might me a good time to talk about how I got to be here, blogging on issues, events, voting,  etc.  I graduated from college as a Speech Pathologist in 1973.  I began to look for jobs.  That summer, there was an ad in the paper for a volunteer to work with children on their speech supporting the speech therapy lessons they were receiving.  I thought, wow, who better than me?  I worked with Tim and Susie that summer, helping them practice what they learned from their speech pathologist.  They lived at the Willmar State Hospital for a couple of weeks to get their speech services.  What a display of dedication from their parents to let their children come to Willmar to receive speech therapy!\n\nLater that summer, the Willmar State Hospital posted a job description looking for a speech therapist to work for a new program called the Glacial Ridge Training Center.  I went in for an interview and got the job.  My only experience was working with children with Down Syndrome - namely Tim and Susie.  I had no idea what I was signing up for.\n\nWhen I first started, it was like they didn't know just what to do with me.  At that time, there were allegations that some of the state hospitals were ont caring well for those with disabilities.  Each state hospital in the system had a specialty - Willmar's was alcholism.  The State of MN decided that they would 'regionalize' the state hospitals, moving residents closer to home, near their families.  Therefore Willmar would open up a new program for the developmentally delayed.  And I was their speech pathologist.\n\nSo I read records and tried to figure out just what my role was.  They didn't even mention this kind of assignment in college!!  The new program was progressive in how they treated their clients.  No more restraints, talking down to them, treating them as if they were children.  We were to respect them, talk to them as we would talk to others.  Take the time to see the humanity in them.  Materials we used were to be age-appropriate.  No baby toys for an adult to work with.  Find something that would be age appropriate and yet teach the same concept.  For example, don't sort blocks but sort silverware.\n\nI worked there for 17 months.  I started a program to evaluate all of the residents on my caseload, created evening activities for the staff, helped Willmar Schools start a program for school age children.  I learned something every day I worked there.  I treated everyone with respect and worked hard to make their lives the best they could be, considering the circumstances.\n\nI still see some of those 'residents' (as we were told to call them) at our events for Arc.  They are now living outside of the state hospital and seem to be very happy and healthy.  What a change since 1973!!\n\nMy husband and I moved to the cities.  He started his first teaching job and I looked for work as a speech pathologist, but couldn't find any.  My husband was laid off from Minneapolis Public Schools (they were laying off 50-100 people every summer, so we looked elsewhere.  We got a phone call from Willmar asking my husband if he would be interested in a job and they also had a speech pathologist opening.  We moved back to Willmar to our new jobs.\n\nTo Be Continued Next Week!","rawcontent":"I thought this might me a good time to talk about how I got to be here, blogging on issues, events, voting, etc. I graduated from college as a Speech Pathologist in 1973. I began to look for jobs. That summer, there was an ad in the paper for a volunteer to work with children on their speech supporting the speech therapy lessons they were receiving. I thought, wow, who better than me? I worked with Tim and Susie that summer, helping them practice what they learned from their speech pathologist. They lived at the Willmar State Hospital for a couple of weeks to get their speech services. What a display of dedication from their parents to let their children come to Willmar to receive speech therapy!\n\nLater that summer, the Willmar State Hospital posted a job description looking for a speech therapist to work for a new program called the Glacial Ridge Training Center. I went in for an interview and got the job. My only experience was working with children with Down Syndrome - namely Tim and Susie. I had no idea what I was signing up for.\n\nWhen I first started, it was like they didn't know just what to do with me. At that time, there were allegations that some of the state hospitals were ont caring well for those with disabilities. Each state hospital in the system had a specialty - Willmar's was alcholism. The State of MN decided that they would 'regionalize' the state hospitals, moving residents closer to home, near their families. Therefore Willmar would open up a new program for the developmentally delayed. And I was their speech pathologist.\n\nSo I read records and tried to figure out just what my role was. They didn't even mention this kind of assignment in college!! The new program was progressive in how they treated their clients. No more restraints, talking down to them, treating them as if they were children. We were to respect them, talk to them as we would talk to others. Take the time to see the humanity in them. Materials we used were to be age-appropriate. No baby toys for an adult to work with. Find something that would be age appropriate and yet teach the same concept. For example, don't sort blocks but sort silverware.\n\nI worked there for 17 months. I started a program to evaluate all of the residents on my caseload, created evening activities for the staff, helped Willmar Schools start a program for school age children. I learned something every day I worked there. I treated everyone with respect and worked hard to make their lives the best they could be, considering the circumstances.\n\nI still see some of those 'residents' (as we were told to call them) at our events for Arc. They are now living outside of the state hospital and seem to be very happy and healthy. What a change since 1973!!\n\nMy husband and I moved to the cities. He started his first teaching job and I looked for work as a speech pathologist, but couldn't find any. My husband was laid off from Minneapolis Public Schools (they were laying off 50-100 people every summer, so we looked elsewhere. We got a phone call from Willmar asking my husband if he would be interested in a job and they also had a speech pathologist opening. We moved back to Willmar to our new jobs.\n\nTo Be Continued Next Week!","contentnoshortcodes":"I thought this might me a good time to talk about how I got to be here, blogging on issues, events, voting, etc. I graduated from college as a Speech Pathologist in 1973. I began to look for jobs. That summer, there was an ad in the paper for a volunteer to work with children on their speech supporting the speech therapy lessons they were receiving. I thought, wow, who better than me? I worked with Tim and Susie that summer, helping them practice what they learned from their speech pathologist. They lived at the Willmar State Hospital for a couple of weeks to get their speech services. What a display of dedication from their parents to let their children come to Willmar to receive speech therapy!\n\nLater that summer, the Willmar State Hospital posted a job description looking for a speech therapist to work for a new program called the Glacial Ridge Training Center. I went in for an interview and got the job. My only experience was working with children with Down Syndrome - namely Tim and Susie. I had no idea what I was signing up for.\n\nWhen I first started, it was like they didn't know just what to do with me. At that time, there were allegations that some of the state hospitals were ont caring well for those with disabilities. Each state hospital in the system had a specialty - Willmar's was alcholism. The State of MN decided that they would 'regionalize' the state hospitals, moving residents closer to home, near their families. Therefore Willmar would open up a new program for the developmentally delayed. And I was their speech pathologist.\n\nSo I read records and tried to figure out just what my role was. They didn't even mention this kind of assignment in college!! The new program was progressive in how they treated their clients. No more restraints, talking down to them, treating them as if they were children. We were to respect them, talk to them as we would talk to others. Take the time to see the humanity in them. Materials we used were to be age-appropriate. No baby toys for an adult to work with. Find something that would be age appropriate and yet teach the same concept. For example, don't sort blocks but sort silverware.\n\nI worked there for 17 months. I started a program to evaluate all of the residents on my caseload, created evening activities for the staff, helped Willmar Schools start a program for school age children. I learned something every day I worked there. I treated everyone with respect and worked hard to make their lives the best they could be, considering the circumstances.\n\nI still see some of those 'residents' (as we were told to call them) at our events for Arc. They are now living outside of the state hospital and seem to be very happy and healthy. What a change since 1973!!\n\nMy husband and I moved to the cities. He started his first teaching job and I looked for work as a speech pathologist, but couldn't find any. My husband was laid off from Minneapolis Public Schools (they were laying off 50-100 people every summer, so we looked elsewhere. We got a phone call from Willmar asking my husband if he would be interested in a job and they also had a speech pathologist opening. We moved back to Willmar to our new jobs.\n\nTo Be Continued Next Week!","numcomments":0,"author":"Mary Rhude","author_s":"http://arckandi.areavoices.com/author/rhudem/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-12-23T14:15:59Z","displaydate":"2012-12-23 08:15:59","displaymodified":"2012-12-23 20:15:33","categories":["Arc Kandiyohi County","Institutionalization","People with Disabilities"],"spell":["It's All About Me","I thought this might me a good time to talk about how I got to be here, blogging on issues, events, voting,  etc.  I graduated from college as a Speech Pathologist in 1973.  I began to look for jobs.  That summer, there was an ad in the paper for a volunteer to work with children on their speech supporting the speech therapy lessons they were receiving.  I thought, wow, who better than me?  I worked with Tim and Susie that summer, helping them practice what they learned from their speech pathologist.  They lived at the Willmar State Hospital for a couple of weeks to get their speech services.  What a display of dedication from their parents to let their children come to Willmar to receive speech therapy!\n\nLater that summer, the Willmar State Hospital posted a job description looking for a speech therapist to work for a new program called the Glacial Ridge Training Center.  I went in for an interview and got the job.  My only experience was working with children with Down Syndrome - namely Tim and Susie.  I had no idea what I was signing up for.\n\nWhen I first started, it was like they didn't know just what to do with me.  At that time, there were allegations that some of the state hospitals were ont caring well for those with disabilities.  Each state hospital in the system had a specialty - Willmar's was alcholism.  The State of MN decided that they would 'regionalize' the state hospitals, moving residents closer to home, near their families.  Therefore Willmar would open up a new program for the developmentally delayed.  And I was their speech pathologist.\n\nSo I read records and tried to figure out just what my role was.  They didn't even mention this kind of assignment in college!!  The new program was progressive in how they treated their clients.  No more restraints, talking down to them, treating them as if they were children.  We were to respect them, talk to them as we would talk to others.  Take the time to see the humanity in them.  Materials we used were to be age-appropriate.  No baby toys for an adult to work with.  Find something that would be age appropriate and yet teach the same concept.  For example, don't sort blocks but sort silverware.\n\nI worked there for 17 months.  I started a program to evaluate all of the residents on my caseload, created evening activities for the staff, helped Willmar Schools start a program for school age children.  I learned something every day I worked there.  I treated everyone with respect and worked hard to make their lives the best they could be, considering the circumstances.\n\nI still see some of those 'residents' (as we were told to call them) at our events for Arc.  They are now living outside of the state hospital and seem to be very happy and healthy.  What a change since 1973!!\n\nMy husband and I moved to the cities.  He started his first teaching job and I looked for work as a speech pathologist, but couldn't find any.  My husband was laid off from Minneapolis Public Schools (they were laying off 50-100 people every summer, so we looked elsewhere.  We got a phone call from Willmar asking my husband if he would be interested in a job and they also had a speech pathologist opening.  We moved back to Willmar to our new jobs.\n\nTo Be Continued Next Week!","Mary Rhude"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:newlondonart.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":1,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:fccdigital.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":0,"start":0,"docs":[]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:retire.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":147,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"retire.areavoices.com/1664","permalink":"http://retire.areavoices.com/2014/07/16/retirement-planning-obstacles/","blogid":"21687","blogdomain":"retire.areavoices.com","hostname":"retire.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"5 Retirement Planning Obstacles","content":"What Are the Obstacles to Successful Retirement Planning?\n\nThere are a number of obstacles that you may face in planning for your retirement:\n Discipline to Save\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1668\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Discipline to save.[/caption]\n\n\t Many people find it difficult to form the habit of “paying themselves first,” by making regular deposits to a savings plan.\n\n Saving to Spend\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1669\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Saving to Spend[/caption]\n\n\t Money is saved for retirement purposes, but then is spent to make purchases.\n\n \n Income Taxes\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1519\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Income Taxes[/caption]\n\n\t Income taxes can erode the growth of your retirement savings.\n\nLonger Life Expectancies\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1674\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Advances in medical care and science is allowing us to live longer than ever before.[/caption]\n\n\t Longer life expectancies increase the risk of retirees outliving at least a portion of their retirement income.\n\nInflation\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1673\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Inflation requires more money to buy the same goods.[/caption]\n\nLonger life expectancies also increase the risk of inflation eroding the purchasing power of retirement income. \n\n\tFor example, if inflation increases at 3.5% a year, it would require over $1,400 in 10 years in order to maintain the original purchasing power of $1,000.\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","rawcontent":"What Are the Obstacles to Successful Retirement Planning?\n\nThere are a number of obstacles that you may face in planning for your retirement:\nDiscipline to Save\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1668\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Discipline to save.[/caption]\n\nMany people find it difficult to form the habit of paying themselves first, by making regular deposits to a savings plan.\n\nSaving to Spend\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1669\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Saving to Spend[/caption]\n\nMoney is saved for retirement purposes, but then is spent to make purchases.\n\n \nIncome Taxes\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1519\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Income Taxes[/caption]\n\nIncome taxes can erode the growth of your retirement savings.\n\nLonger Life Expectancies\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1674\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Advances in medical care and science is allowing us to live longer than ever before.[/caption]\n\nLonger life expectancies increase the risk of retirees outliving at least a portion of their retirement income.\n\nInflation\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1673\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Inflation requires more money to buy the same goods.[/caption]\n\nLonger life expectancies also increase the risk of inflation eroding the purchasing power of retirement income. \n\nFor example, if inflation increases at 3.5% a year, it would require over $1,400 in 10 years in order to maintain the original purchasing power of $1,000.\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","contentnoshortcodes":"What Are the Obstacles to Successful Retirement Planning?\n\nThere are a number of obstacles that you may face in planning for your retirement:\nDiscipline to Save\n\n\n\n\nMany people find it difficult to form the habit of paying themselves first, by making regular deposits to a savings plan.\n\nSaving to Spend\n\n\n\n\nMoney is saved for retirement purposes, but then is spent to make purchases.\n\n \nIncome Taxes\n\n\n\n\nIncome taxes can erode the growth of your retirement savings.\n\nLonger Life Expectancies\n\n\n\n\nLonger life expectancies increase the risk of retirees outliving at least a portion of their retirement income.\n\nInflation\n\n\n\n\nLonger life expectancies also increase the risk of inflation eroding the purchasing power of retirement income. \n\nFor example, if inflation increases at 3.5% a year, it would require over $1,400 in 10 years in order to maintain the original purchasing power of $1,000.\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","numcomments":0,"author":"Tim Barton","author_s":"http://retire.areavoices.com/author/timbarton/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-07-16T13:56:44Z","displaydate":"2014-07-16 08:56:44","displaymodified":"2014-07-16 09:54:11","tags":["Aging","finance","lifestyle","Longevity","Money","Retirement","retirement income","retirement planning"],"categories":["Lifestyle","Longevity","Retirement Planning"],"spell":["5 Retirement Planning Obstacles","What Are the Obstacles to Successful Retirement Planning?\n\nThere are a number of obstacles that you may face in planning for your retirement:\n Discipline to Save\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1668\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Discipline to save.[/caption]\n\n\t Many people find it difficult to form the habit of “paying themselves first,” by making regular deposits to a savings plan.\n\n Saving to Spend\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1669\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Saving to Spend[/caption]\n\n\t Money is saved for retirement purposes, but then is spent to make purchases.\n\n \n Income Taxes\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1519\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Income Taxes[/caption]\n\n\t Income taxes can erode the growth of your retirement savings.\n\nLonger Life Expectancies\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1674\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Advances in medical care and science is allowing us to live longer than ever before.[/caption]\n\n\t Longer life expectancies increase the risk of retirees outliving at least a portion of their retirement income.\n\nInflation\n\n\n[caption id=\"attachment_1673\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"150\"] Inflation requires more money to buy the same goods.[/caption]\n\nLonger life expectancies also increase the risk of inflation eroding the purchasing power of retirement income. \n\n\tFor example, if inflation increases at 3.5% a year, it would require over $1,400 in 10 years in order to maintain the original purchasing power of $1,000.\n\n \n\n \n\n \n\n ","Tim Barton"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:joefitness.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":97,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"joefitness.areavoices.com/395","permalink":"http://joefitness.areavoices.com/2013/03/30/lets-get-that-body-summer-ready/","blogid":"21683","blogdomain":"joefitness.areavoices.com","hostname":"joefitness.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Let's Get That Body Summer Ready!","content":"Despite the cold spring weather, summer is coming and with summer comes summer clothes. Are you ready for them? Here are a few ideas how to get your body ready for the summer wear! \n\nClean Up Your Menu\nChallenge yourself to eat 5 different vegetables a day. Have fruit for breakfast instead of that bagel. Switch to black coffee instead of the sugary stuff you're having now. Eat nuts for sustaining energy in the afternoon instead of that energy drink. You'd be surprised how making just a few minor changes can make you feel great and make a big change on the scale.\n\nGet Moving\nThis is the obvious one, but you need to start exercising. It doesn't need to be the endless intense session at the gym 7 days a week. Thirty minutes a day of activity is a great start. Walking, jogging, strength training, group exercise classes, swimming, it doesn't matter just start doing something! \n\nTrack your progress\nNeed some motivation? Try on those summer clothes and track how they fit week by week. Hang that swimsuit on the mirror so you get reminded everyday of your summer goals. Each week write down how the clothes fit. Are they super tight? Can you zip up the zippers? Do you feel confident in them? Keeping a log can really help motivate you to make the change!\n\nChallenge Yourself\nSummer brings a number of exercise events around the area and now is a great time to start training for them! Make a goal to run a few 5Ks this summer or maybe run that first obstacle race. Whatever it is, challenge yourself to move!\n\nLet's make this summer the summer you feel confident in those summer clothes! Now get moving! ","rawcontent":"Despite the cold spring weather, summer is coming and with summer comes summer clothes. Are you ready for them? Here are a few ideas how to get your body ready for the summer wear! \n\nClean Up Your Menu\nChallenge yourself to eat 5 different vegetables a day. Have fruit for breakfast instead of that bagel. Switch to black coffee instead of the sugary stuff you're having now. Eat nuts for sustaining energy in the afternoon instead of that energy drink. You'd be surprised how making just a few minor changes can make you feel great and make a big change on the scale.\n\nGet Moving\nThis is the obvious one, but you need to start exercising. It doesn't need to be the endless intense session at the gym 7 days a week. Thirty minutes a day of activity is a great start. Walking, jogging, strength training, group exercise classes, swimming, it doesn't matter just start doing something! \n\nTrack your progress\nNeed some motivation? Try on those summer clothes and track how they fit week by week. Hang that swimsuit on the mirror so you get reminded everyday of your summer goals. Each week write down how the clothes fit. Are they super tight? Can you zip up the zippers? Do you feel confident in them? Keeping a log can really help motivate you to make the change!\n\nChallenge Yourself\nSummer brings a number of exercise events around the area and now is a great time to start training for them! Make a goal to run a few 5Ks this summer or maybe run that first obstacle race. Whatever it is, challenge yourself to move!\n\nLet's make this summer the summer you feel confident in those summer clothes! Now get moving! ","contentnoshortcodes":"Despite the cold spring weather, summer is coming and with summer comes summer clothes. Are you ready for them? Here are a few ideas how to get your body ready for the summer wear! \n\nClean Up Your Menu\nChallenge yourself to eat 5 different vegetables a day. Have fruit for breakfast instead of that bagel. Switch to black coffee instead of the sugary stuff you're having now. Eat nuts for sustaining energy in the afternoon instead of that energy drink. You'd be surprised how making just a few minor changes can make you feel great and make a big change on the scale.\n\nGet Moving\nThis is the obvious one, but you need to start exercising. It doesn't need to be the endless intense session at the gym 7 days a week. Thirty minutes a day of activity is a great start. Walking, jogging, strength training, group exercise classes, swimming, it doesn't matter just start doing something! \n\nTrack your progress\nNeed some motivation? Try on those summer clothes and track how they fit week by week. Hang that swimsuit on the mirror so you get reminded everyday of your summer goals. Each week write down how the clothes fit. Are they super tight? Can you zip up the zippers? Do you feel confident in them? Keeping a log can really help motivate you to make the change!\n\nChallenge Yourself\nSummer brings a number of exercise events around the area and now is a great time to start training for them! Make a goal to run a few 5Ks this summer or maybe run that first obstacle race. Whatever it is, challenge yourself to move!\n\nLet's make this summer the summer you feel confident in those summer clothes! Now get moving! ","numcomments":0,"author":"Joe Ketterling","author_s":"http://joefitness.areavoices.com/author/joefitness/","type":"post","publishtime":"2013-03-30T14:05:21Z","displaydate":"2013-03-30 14:05:21","displaymodified":"2013-03-30 14:05:21","tags":["exercise","fat loss","fitness","health","shesays","summer"],"categories":["Fitness"],"spell":["Let's Get That Body Summer Ready!","Despite the cold spring weather, summer is coming and with summer comes summer clothes. Are you ready for them? Here are a few ideas how to get your body ready for the summer wear! \n\nClean Up Your Menu\nChallenge yourself to eat 5 different vegetables a day. Have fruit for breakfast instead of that bagel. Switch to black coffee instead of the sugary stuff you're having now. Eat nuts for sustaining energy in the afternoon instead of that energy drink. You'd be surprised how making just a few minor changes can make you feel great and make a big change on the scale.\n\nGet Moving\nThis is the obvious one, but you need to start exercising. It doesn't need to be the endless intense session at the gym 7 days a week. Thirty minutes a day of activity is a great start. Walking, jogging, strength training, group exercise classes, swimming, it doesn't matter just start doing something! \n\nTrack your progress\nNeed some motivation? Try on those summer clothes and track how they fit week by week. Hang that swimsuit on the mirror so you get reminded everyday of your summer goals. Each week write down how the clothes fit. Are they super tight? Can you zip up the zippers? Do you feel confident in them? Keeping a log can really help motivate you to make the change!\n\nChallenge Yourself\nSummer brings a number of exercise events around the area and now is a great time to start training for them! Make a goal to run a few 5Ks this summer or maybe run that first obstacle race. Whatever it is, challenge yourself to move!\n\nLet's make this summer the summer you feel confident in those summer clothes! Now get moving! ","Joe Ketterling"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","q":"hostname:isaacsbolin.areavoices.com","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1"}},"response":{"numFound":27,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"isaacsbolin.areavoices.com/305","permalink":"http://isaacsbolin.areavoices.com/2012/06/12/sharing-everything-isnt-necessarily-a-good-thing/","blogid":"26213","blogdomain":"isaacsbolin.areavoices.com","hostname":"isaacsbolin.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"Sharing Everything Isn't Necessarily A Good Thing","content":"Remember when mom taught you to share with others. Well, Verizon Wireless is veiling their new plan in the connotation that sharing is in the spirit of kindness.\n\nVerizon Wireless' new 'Share Everything' plans were just announced today. They are disguised in this news release from Verizon to be a good thing for the customer. However, they are not. That is unless you still use your phone for simply talk and text.\n\nIn this day and age it seems to be all about smartphones. In the last year they have taken over the majority of the handset market here in America. This means data usage is becoming more and more common for mobile phone users. The new pricing plan of Verizon's eliminates choices for talk minutes or number of texts, they are now all unlimited. But Verizon also eliminated unlimited data usage, now you must choose between $50/month for 1 GB all the way up to $100/month for 10 GB.\n\nSo, the good thing about this new Share Everything Plan is that you can go back to your olden ways and simply call or text to communicate. If you don't have the money, you'll be forced to sparingly use the internet on your mobile device. Thanks a lot Verizon, let's not move forward with communication technology for everyone, let's make the middle class go back to the mid 2000's when everything was talk and text.\n\nI know many people that are hooked on this new trend of surfing the internet and using apps on smartphones. Now the big corporations are forcing us to pony up. Reminiscent of a tobacco industry that came alive in the early 20th century. Not to say using smartphones is an unhealthy habit as cigarettes are, but it can be addicting, and manipulated by the big corporations in how much you pay for it.\n\nSo while Verizon gouges their customers because the customer has no other clear cut choice, I think we should look to the government for some help, maybe the Justice Department can do something about what looks like collusion in the mobile phone service industry. Verizon has been on the hot seat with a Wisconsin senator warning of collusion.\n\nI learned of this increase in prices from a website I like to occasionally wander around on called publicknowledge.org where I found this article about Verizon's new plan. Here is a look at an infographic on the history of the telecom industry to today, well actually it is circa 2011 - Wall Street Journal:\n\n[caption id=\"\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"738\" caption=\"'Ma Bell' is just fine\"][/caption]\n\nThere is an overly exaggerated theory called 'spectrum crunch' that states the wireless waves are full and therefore the telecom industry can raise wireless data prices. It is a valid explanation but through the use of technology there are ways around the spectrum crunch. Some thought of by Martin Cooper.\n\nRandom thought of the day:\nI'm going to invent an off switch for smoke alarms. Sorry everyone, I was just attempting to cook.","rawcontent":"Remember when mom taught you to share with others. Well, Verizon Wireless is veiling their new plan in the connotation that sharing is in the spirit of kindness.\n\nVerizon Wireless' new 'Share Everything' plans were just announced today. They are disguised in this news release from Verizon to be a good thing for the customer. However, they are not. That is unless you still use your phone for simply talk and text.\n\nIn this day and age it seems to be all about smartphones. In the last year they have taken over the majority of the handset market here in America. This means data usage is becoming more and more common for mobile phone users. The new pricing plan of Verizon's eliminates choices for talk minutes or number of texts, they are now all unlimited. But Verizon also eliminated unlimited data usage, now you must choose between $50/month for 1 GB all the way up to $100/month for 10 GB.\n\nSo, the good thing about this new Share Everything Plan is that you can go back to your olden ways and simply call or text to communicate. If you don't have the money, you'll be forced to sparingly use the internet on your mobile device. Thanks a lot Verizon, let's not move forward with communication technology for everyone, let's make the middle class go back to the mid 2000's when everything was talk and text.\n\nI know many people that are hooked on this new trend of surfing the internet and using apps on smartphones. Now the big corporations are forcing us to pony up. Reminiscent of a tobacco industry that came alive in the early 20th century. Not to say using smartphones is an unhealthy habit as cigarettes are, but it can be addicting, and manipulated by the big corporations in how much you pay for it.\n\nSo while Verizon gouges their customers because the customer has no other clear cut choice, I think we should look to the government for some help, maybe the Justice Department can do something about what looks like collusion in the mobile phone service industry. Verizon has been on the hot seat with a Wisconsin senator warning of collusion.\n\nI learned of this increase in prices from a website I like to occasionally wander around on called publicknowledge.org where I found this article about Verizon's new plan. Here is a look at an infographic on the history of the telecom industry to today, well actually it is circa 2011 - Wall Street Journal:\n\n[caption id=\"\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"738\" caption=\"'Ma Bell' is just fine\"][/caption]\n\nThere is an overly exaggerated theory called 'spectrum crunch' that states the wireless waves are full and therefore the telecom industry can raise wireless data prices. It is a valid explanation but through the use of technology there are ways around the spectrum crunch. Some thought of by Martin Cooper.\n\nRandom thought of the day:\nI'm going to invent an off switch for smoke alarms. Sorry everyone, I was just attempting to cook.","contentnoshortcodes":"Remember when mom taught you to share with others. Well, Verizon Wireless is veiling their new plan in the connotation that sharing is in the spirit of kindness.\n\nVerizon Wireless' new 'Share Everything' plans were just announced today. They are disguised in this news release from Verizon to be a good thing for the customer. However, they are not. That is unless you still use your phone for simply talk and text.\n\nIn this day and age it seems to be all about smartphones. In the last year they have taken over the majority of the handset market here in America. This means data usage is becoming more and more common for mobile phone users. The new pricing plan of Verizon's eliminates choices for talk minutes or number of texts, they are now all unlimited. But Verizon also eliminated unlimited data usage, now you must choose between $50/month for 1 GB all the way up to $100/month for 10 GB.\n\nSo, the good thing about this new Share Everything Plan is that you can go back to your olden ways and simply call or text to communicate. If you don't have the money, you'll be forced to sparingly use the internet on your mobile device. Thanks a lot Verizon, let's not move forward with communication technology for everyone, let's make the middle class go back to the mid 2000's when everything was talk and text.\n\nI know many people that are hooked on this new trend of surfing the internet and using apps on smartphones. Now the big corporations are forcing us to pony up. Reminiscent of a tobacco industry that came alive in the early 20th century. Not to say using smartphones is an unhealthy habit as cigarettes are, but it can be addicting, and manipulated by the big corporations in how much you pay for it.\n\nSo while Verizon gouges their customers because the customer has no other clear cut choice, I think we should look to the government for some help, maybe the Justice Department can do something about what looks like collusion in the mobile phone service industry. Verizon has been on the hot seat with a Wisconsin senator warning of collusion.\n\nI learned of this increase in prices from a website I like to occasionally wander around on called publicknowledge.org where I found this article about Verizon's new plan. Here is a look at an infographic on the history of the telecom industry to today, well actually it is circa 2011 - Wall Street Journal:\n\n\n\nThere is an overly exaggerated theory called 'spectrum crunch' that states the wireless waves are full and therefore the telecom industry can raise wireless data prices. It is a valid explanation but through the use of technology there are ways around the spectrum crunch. Some thought of by Martin Cooper.\n\nRandom thought of the day:\nI'm going to invent an off switch for smoke alarms. Sorry everyone, I was just attempting to cook.","numcomments":0,"author":"Isaac Bolin","author_s":"http://isaacsbolin.areavoices.com/author/isaacsbolin/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-06-12T23:46:29Z","displaydate":"2012-06-12 23:46:29","displaymodified":"2012-06-13 03:18:42","tags":["collusion","data","everything","mobile","plan","share","smartphones","spectrum crunch","verizon"],"categories":["The Bigger Issue","Trends"],"spell":["Sharing Everything Isn't Necessarily A Good Thing","Remember when mom taught you to share with others. Well, Verizon Wireless is veiling their new plan in the connotation that sharing is in the spirit of kindness.\n\nVerizon Wireless' new 'Share Everything' plans were just announced today. They are disguised in this news release from Verizon to be a good thing for the customer. However, they are not. That is unless you still use your phone for simply talk and text.\n\nIn this day and age it seems to be all about smartphones. In the last year they have taken over the majority of the handset market here in America. This means data usage is becoming more and more common for mobile phone users. The new pricing plan of Verizon's eliminates choices for talk minutes or number of texts, they are now all unlimited. But Verizon also eliminated unlimited data usage, now you must choose between $50/month for 1 GB all the way up to $100/month for 10 GB.\n\nSo, the good thing about this new Share Everything Plan is that you can go back to your olden ways and simply call or text to communicate. If you don't have the money, you'll be forced to sparingly use the internet on your mobile device. Thanks a lot Verizon, let's not move forward with communication technology for everyone, let's make the middle class go back to the mid 2000's when everything was talk and text.\n\nI know many people that are hooked on this new trend of surfing the internet and using apps on smartphones. Now the big corporations are forcing us to pony up. Reminiscent of a tobacco industry that came alive in the early 20th century. Not to say using smartphones is an unhealthy habit as cigarettes are, but it can be addicting, and manipulated by the big corporations in how much you pay for it.\n\nSo while Verizon gouges their customers because the customer has no other clear cut choice, I think we should look to the government for some help, maybe the Justice Department can do something about what looks like collusion in the mobile phone service industry. Verizon has been on the hot seat with a Wisconsin senator warning of collusion.\n\nI learned of this increase in prices from a website I like to occasionally wander around on called publicknowledge.org where I found this article about Verizon's new plan. Here is a look at an infographic on the history of the telecom industry to today, well actually it is circa 2011 - Wall Street Journal:\n\n[caption id=\"\" align=\"aligncenter\" width=\"738\" caption=\"'Ma Bell' is just fine\"][/caption]\n\nThere is an overly exaggerated theory called 'spectrum crunch' that states the wireless waves are full and therefore the telecom industry can raise wireless data prices. It is a valid explanation but through the use of technology there are ways around the spectrum crunch. Some thought of by Martin Cooper.\n\nRandom thought of the day:\nI'm going to invent an off switch for smoke alarms. Sorry everyone, I was just attempting to cook.","Isaac Bolin"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:familyenergyfaceoff.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":1,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"familyenergyfaceoff.areavoices.com/104","permalink":"http://familyenergyfaceoff.areavoices.com/2012/09/10/the-heat-is-on-but-im-still-saving-money/","blogid":"30880","blogdomain":"familyenergyfaceoff.areavoices.com","hostname":"familyenergyfaceoff.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"The Heat is On (But I'm Still Saving Money)","content":"As summer winds down, and the nights start to take on a little chill, I've started thinking about the winter heating season again.  We have a geothermal heating system in our house which is fairly efficient, but I'm always looking for more ways to save energy and money.  To that end, I went out and purchased a programmable thermostat last weekend.\n\nWe were told when we installed our heat pump that we shouldn't use a programmable thermostat.  The installer said that when a heat pump is in heating mode, setting back its thermostat can actually make it run less efficiently, in effect cancelling out any savings gained by lowering the temperature.  However, some companies have recently begun selling specially designed programmable thermostats for heat pumps, and they now say that using one of these can make setting the thermostat back cost effective.  We'll give it a try this year and see what happens.\n\nIn general, programmable thermostats can be an excellent investment.  If you are using it for controlling the temperature while you are sleeping and while you are at work, you can see some very good savings and wake up to a comfortable home.  In most cases, the thermostat will pay for itself in less than two years.  To learn more about how you can save money and energy this winter, check out the Department of Energy's Energy Savers programmable thermostat page.  You can also find a programmable thermostat consumer calculator there that will help you get an estimate of how much you might save.\n\nIf you want to see something really cool, check out this Apple-like foray into domestic gadgets called the Nest Thermostat.  Designed by former Apple designer Tony Fadell, the thermostat programs itself over a weeks time based on how you are adjusting the settings.  Not only is it simple to use, but it's cute and you can access and control the thermostat from your office or your smartphone.\n\nUpdate: The Penny Pinchers have been pulling away!  We need your help to get back in this game.  The Family Energy FACE-OFF is a year-long energy saving competition between two families from Earth Day 2012 to Earth Day 2013.  Our family, the Mill Pond Minimizers, gets points when you join our team and do energy saving actions.  Won't you  join us?  It's easy, just:\n\n\tClick here: http://www.cleanenergyresourceteams.org/faceoff/join-team-jeff\n\tClick on any energy saving actions you have completed.\n\tSubmit your actions and join the Mill Pond Minimizers!\n\n","rawcontent":"As summer winds down, and the nights start totake on a little chill, I've started thinkingabout the winter heating season again. We have a geothermal heating system in our house which is fairly efficient, but I'm always looking for more ways to save energy and money. To that end, I went out and purchased a programmable thermostat last weekend.\n\nWe were told when we installed our heat pump that we shouldn't use a programmable thermostat. The installer said that when a heat pump is in heating mode, setting back its thermostat can actually make it run less efficiently, in effect cancelling out any savings gained by lowering the temperature. However, some companies have recently begun selling specially designed programmable thermostats for heat pumps, and they now say that using one of these can make setting the thermostat back cost effective. We'll give it a try this year and see what happens.\n\nIn general, programmable thermostats can be an excellent investment. If you are using it for controlling the temperature while you are sleeping and while you are at work, you can see some very good savingsand wake up to a comfortable home. In most cases, the thermostat will pay for itself in less than two years. To learn more about how you can save money and energy this winter,check out the Department of Energy's Energy Savers programmable thermostat page. You can also find a programmable thermostat consumer calculatorthere that will help you get an estimate of how much you might save.\n\nIf you want to see something really cool, check out this Apple-like foray into domestic gadgets called the Nest Thermostat. Designed by former Apple designer Tony Fadell, thethermostat programs itself over a weeks time based on how you are adjusting the settings. Not only is it simple to use, but it's cute andyou can access and control the thermostat from your office or your smartphone.\n\nUpdate: The Penny Pinchers have been pulling away! We need your help to get back in this game. The Family Energy FACE-OFF is a year-long energy saving competition between two families from Earth Day 2012 to Earth Day 2013. Our family, the Mill Pond Minimizers, gets points when you join our team and do energy saving actions. Won't you join us? It's easy, just:\n\nClick here:http://www.cleanenergyresourceteams.org/faceoff/join-team-jeff\nClick on any energy saving actions you have completed.\nSubmit your actions and join the Mill Pond Minimizers!\n\n","contentnoshortcodes":"As summer winds down, and the nights start totake on a little chill, I've started thinkingabout the winter heating season again. We have a geothermal heating system in our house which is fairly efficient, but I'm always looking for more ways to save energy and money. To that end, I went out and purchased a programmable thermostat last weekend.\n\nWe were told when we installed our heat pump that we shouldn't use a programmable thermostat. The installer said that when a heat pump is in heating mode, setting back its thermostat can actually make it run less efficiently, in effect cancelling out any savings gained by lowering the temperature. However, some companies have recently begun selling specially designed programmable thermostats for heat pumps, and they now say that using one of these can make setting the thermostat back cost effective. We'll give it a try this year and see what happens.\n\nIn general, programmable thermostats can be an excellent investment. If you are using it for controlling the temperature while you are sleeping and while you are at work, you can see some very good savingsand wake up to a comfortable home. In most cases, the thermostat will pay for itself in less than two years. To learn more about how you can save money and energy this winter,check out the Department of Energy's Energy Savers programmable thermostat page. You can also find a programmable thermostat consumer calculatorthere that will help you get an estimate of how much you might save.\n\nIf you want to see something really cool, check out this Apple-like foray into domestic gadgets called the Nest Thermostat. Designed by former Apple designer Tony Fadell, thethermostat programs itself over a weeks time based on how you are adjusting the settings. Not only is it simple to use, but it's cute andyou can access and control the thermostat from your office or your smartphone.\n\nUpdate: The Penny Pinchers have been pulling away! We need your help to get back in this game. The Family Energy FACE-OFF is a year-long energy saving competition between two families from Earth Day 2012 to Earth Day 2013. Our family, the Mill Pond Minimizers, gets points when you join our team and do energy saving actions. Won't you join us? It's easy, just:\n\nClick here:http://www.cleanenergyresourceteams.org/faceoff/join-team-jeff\nClick on any energy saving actions you have completed.\nSubmit your actions and join the Mill Pond Minimizers!\n\n","numcomments":0,"author":"Jeff Vetsch","author_s":"http://familyenergyfaceoff.areavoices.com/author/familyenergyfaceoff/","type":"post","publishtime":"2012-09-10T15:10:33Z","displaydate":"2012-09-10 15:10:33","displaymodified":"2012-09-10 15:40:52","categories":["Uncategorized"],"spell":["The Heat is On (But I'm Still Saving Money)","As summer winds down, and the nights start to take on a little chill, I've started thinking about the winter heating season again.  We have a geothermal heating system in our house which is fairly efficient, but I'm always looking for more ways to save energy and money.  To that end, I went out and purchased a programmable thermostat last weekend.\n\nWe were told when we installed our heat pump that we shouldn't use a programmable thermostat.  The installer said that when a heat pump is in heating mode, setting back its thermostat can actually make it run less efficiently, in effect cancelling out any savings gained by lowering the temperature.  However, some companies have recently begun selling specially designed programmable thermostats for heat pumps, and they now say that using one of these can make setting the thermostat back cost effective.  We'll give it a try this year and see what happens.\n\nIn general, programmable thermostats can be an excellent investment.  If you are using it for controlling the temperature while you are sleeping and while you are at work, you can see some very good savings and wake up to a comfortable home.  In most cases, the thermostat will pay for itself in less than two years.  To learn more about how you can save money and energy this winter, check out the Department of Energy's Energy Savers programmable thermostat page.  You can also find a programmable thermostat consumer calculator there that will help you get an estimate of how much you might save.\n\nIf you want to see something really cool, check out this Apple-like foray into domestic gadgets called the Nest Thermostat.  Designed by former Apple designer Tony Fadell, the thermostat programs itself over a weeks time based on how you are adjusting the settings.  Not only is it simple to use, but it's cute and you can access and control the thermostat from your office or your smartphone.\n\nUpdate: The Penny Pinchers have been pulling away!  We need your help to get back in this game.  The Family Energy FACE-OFF is a year-long energy saving competition between two families from Earth Day 2012 to Earth Day 2013.  Our family, the Mill Pond Minimizers, gets points when you join our team and do energy saving actions.  Won't you  join us?  It's easy, just:\n\n\tClick here: http://www.cleanenergyresourceteams.org/faceoff/join-team-jeff\n\tClick on any energy saving actions you have completed.\n\tSubmit your actions and join the Mill Pond Minimizers!\n\n","Jeff Vetsch"]}]}}{"responseHeader":{"status":0,"QTime":0,"params":{"sort":"publishtime desc","wt":"json","version":"2.2","rows":"1","q":"hostname:mirrorofhistory.areavoices.com"}},"response":{"numFound":126,"start":0,"docs":[{"id":"mirrorofhistory.areavoices.com/705","permalink":"http://mirrorofhistory.areavoices.com/2014/02/24/laroi-lobdell-a-strange-sort-of-being/","blogid":"28110","blogdomain":"mirrorofhistory.areavoices.com","hostname":"mirrorofhistory.areavoices.com","blogpath":"/","wp":"multisite","title":"LaRoi Lobdell: ‘A Strange Sort of Being’ ","content":"Here’s a story that’s been told many times, by many people, with lots of variations which just make the story more interesting. It did really happen, with much of it taking place in this area.\n\nForest City was one of the earliest, if not the earliest, settlements in Meeker County. It was also the site of the federal land office — the place where claims from a wide area had to be filed.\n\nMary Lobdell was born in the heavy forests of New York state. She was raised by her parents, particularly her father, so the whole family knew all the essentials about life in the woods, and their daughter was an expert on life in the great outdoors. She hunted, fished and trapped as her contribution to the family’s life far, far from civilization.\n\nHer exploits were famous, and she lived up to her fame as a hunter by bringing as much as 150 deer, 11 bears and innumerable wild cats and foxes as well as hundreds of mink and other animals which were wanted for their skins.\n\nOn one of her hunting expeditions to Pennsylvania she met a fellow who challenged her to a shooting match. If he could out shoot her, she’d have to marry him. She lost the bet and married the winner. It wasn’t long before she realized that she had married a drunk and ran off and left him.\n\nAnd that’s where our story begins.\n\nShe tried to track down her errant husband without much luck. Taking a big step, she started living and dressing as a man, a role she played so well that no one even suspected her gender. Her hunt took her far from New York and Pennsylania, always without success. One version of the story has her working her way near the Mississippi River, and that one dark night the river boat on which she was sailing met and passed another boat on which her erring husband was working. She continued working her way west, giving singing lessons along the way. She worked very hard because she felt her quarry was at hand.\n\nIn Minnesota she worked in a large area reaching from the Lake Minnetonka area to the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nShe kept her disguise as a man, and used the name “LaRoi Lobdell.” The young lady was so successful in this role that one of her neighbors at that time later remembered her as a “hail fellow, well met, and that she had committed no indiscretions” while living and working around the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nWhen her first winter in Minnesota approached, she began looking for shelter in earnest. A group of people from the St. Paul area had platted land for the capitol of the new state of Minnesota. They needed someone to live on the property to maintain their claim. An older woodsman who was looking for shelter for the winter applied for and got the job. He was told he couldn’t do it alone, so he had to find someone to live with him there during the winter. LaRoi Lobdell, as she still called herself, moved into that cabin with the woodsman and they lived together all winter. He never had the faintest idea that his cabin mate was a woman.\n\nHer disguise worked so well so easily that she became a little careless and someone guessed what she had been doing and reported her to the authorities. She was promptly arrested and spent some time in the Forest City hoosegow awaiting trial. When the territorial judge reached Forest City there was a quick trial. LaRoi Slater was found guilty of impersonating a man.\n\nShe served several months in jail until the District Judge arrived to hold court. He could find nothing wrong with women wearing pants, provided they obeyed all laws (which she had) and didn’t disturb the peace.\n\nHer sentence was reversed, and she left Minnesota in a hurry. Nothing was heard from or about her for several years until someone reported that she had been sentenced to life imprisonment in a Pennsylvania prison for shooting and killing a man.\n\nHe wasn’t her husband.","rawcontent":"Heres a story thats been told many times, by many people, with lots of variations which just make the story more interesting. It did really happen, with much of it taking place in this area.\n\nForest City was one of the earliest, if not the earliest, settlements in Meeker County. It was also the site of the federal land office the place where claims from a wide area had to be filed.\n\nMary Lobdell was born in the heavy forests of New York state. She was raised by her parents, particularly her father, so the whole family knew all the essentials about life in the woods, and their daughter was an expert on life in the great outdoors. She hunted, fished and trapped as her contribution to the familys life far, far from civilization.\n\nHer exploits were famous, and she lived up to her fame as a hunter by bringing as much as 150 deer, 11 bears and innumerable wild cats and foxes as well as hundreds of mink and other animals which were wanted for their skins.\n\nOn one of her hunting expeditions to Pennsylvania she met a fellow who challenged her to a shooting match. If he could out shoot her, shed have to marry him. She lost the bet and married the winner. It wasnt long before she realized that she had married a drunk and ran off and left him.\n\nAnd thats where our story begins.\n\nShe tried to track down her errant husband without much luck. Taking a big step, she started living and dressing as a man, a role she played so well that no one even suspected her gender. Her hunt took her far from New York and Pennsylania, always without success. One version of the story has her working her way near the Mississippi River, and that one dark night the river boat on which she was sailing met and passed another boat on which her erring husband was working. She continued working her way west, giving singing lessons along the way. She worked very hard because she felt her quarry was at hand.\n\nIn Minnesota she worked in a large area reaching from the Lake Minnetonka area to the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nShe kept her disguise as a man, and used the name LaRoi Lobdell. The young lady was so successful in this role that one of her neighbors at that time later remembered her as a hail fellow, well met, and that she had committed no indiscretions while living and working around the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nWhen her first winter in Minnesota approached, she began looking for shelter in earnest. A group of people from the St. Paul area had platted land for the capitol of the new state of Minnesota. They needed someone to live on the property to maintain their claim. An older woodsman who was looking for shelter for the winter applied for and got the job. He was told he couldnt do it alone, so he had to find someone to live with him there during the winter. LaRoi Lobdell, as she still called herself, moved into that cabin with the woodsman and they lived together all winter. He never had the faintest idea that his cabin mate was a woman.\n\nHer disguise worked so well so easily that she became a little careless and someone guessed what she had been doing and reported her to the authorities. She was promptly arrested and spent some time in the Forest City hoosegow awaiting trial. When the territorial judge reached Forest City there was a quick trial. LaRoi Slater was found guilty of impersonating a man.\n\nShe served several months in jail until the District Judge arrived to hold court. He could find nothing wrong with women wearing pants, provided they obeyed all laws (which she had) and didnt disturb the peace.\n\nHer sentence was reversed, and she left Minnesota in a hurry. Nothing was heard from or about her for several years until someone reported that she had been sentenced to life imprisonment in a Pennsylvania prison for shooting and killing a man.\n\nHe wasnt her husband.","contentnoshortcodes":"Heres a story thats been told many times, by many people, with lots of variations which just make the story more interesting. It did really happen, with much of it taking place in this area.\n\nForest City was one of the earliest, if not the earliest, settlements in Meeker County. It was also the site of the federal land office the place where claims from a wide area had to be filed.\n\nMary Lobdell was born in the heavy forests of New York state. She was raised by her parents, particularly her father, so the whole family knew all the essentials about life in the woods, and their daughter was an expert on life in the great outdoors. She hunted, fished and trapped as her contribution to the familys life far, far from civilization.\n\nHer exploits were famous, and she lived up to her fame as a hunter by bringing as much as 150 deer, 11 bears and innumerable wild cats and foxes as well as hundreds of mink and other animals which were wanted for their skins.\n\nOn one of her hunting expeditions to Pennsylvania she met a fellow who challenged her to a shooting match. If he could out shoot her, shed have to marry him. She lost the bet and married the winner. It wasnt long before she realized that she had married a drunk and ran off and left him.\n\nAnd thats where our story begins.\n\nShe tried to track down her errant husband without much luck. Taking a big step, she started living and dressing as a man, a role she played so well that no one even suspected her gender. Her hunt took her far from New York and Pennsylania, always without success. One version of the story has her working her way near the Mississippi River, and that one dark night the river boat on which she was sailing met and passed another boat on which her erring husband was working. She continued working her way west, giving singing lessons along the way. She worked very hard because she felt her quarry was at hand.\n\nIn Minnesota she worked in a large area reaching from the Lake Minnetonka area to the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nShe kept her disguise as a man, and used the name LaRoi Lobdell. The young lady was so successful in this role that one of her neighbors at that time later remembered her as a hail fellow, well met, and that she had committed no indiscretions while living and working around the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nWhen her first winter in Minnesota approached, she began looking for shelter in earnest. A group of people from the St. Paul area had platted land for the capitol of the new state of Minnesota. They needed someone to live on the property to maintain their claim. An older woodsman who was looking for shelter for the winter applied for and got the job. He was told he couldnt do it alone, so he had to find someone to live with him there during the winter. LaRoi Lobdell, as she still called herself, moved into that cabin with the woodsman and they lived together all winter. He never had the faintest idea that his cabin mate was a woman.\n\nHer disguise worked so well so easily that she became a little careless and someone guessed what she had been doing and reported her to the authorities. She was promptly arrested and spent some time in the Forest City hoosegow awaiting trial. When the territorial judge reached Forest City there was a quick trial. LaRoi Slater was found guilty of impersonating a man.\n\nShe served several months in jail until the District Judge arrived to hold court. He could find nothing wrong with women wearing pants, provided they obeyed all laws (which she had) and didnt disturb the peace.\n\nHer sentence was reversed, and she left Minnesota in a hurry. Nothing was heard from or about her for several years until someone reported that she had been sentenced to life imprisonment in a Pennsylvania prison for shooting and killing a man.\n\nHe wasnt her husband.","numcomments":0,"author":"Don Miller","author_s":"http://mirrorofhistory.areavoices.com/author/mirrorofhistory/","type":"post","publishtime":"2014-02-24T16:28:07Z","displaydate":"2014-02-24 16:28:07","displaymodified":"2014-02-24 16:28:07","tags":["Forest City","LaRoi Lobdell","Mary Lobdell","Meeker County"],"categories":["Local history"],"spell":["LaRoi Lobdell: ‘A Strange Sort of Being’ ","Here’s a story that’s been told many times, by many people, with lots of variations which just make the story more interesting. It did really happen, with much of it taking place in this area.\n\nForest City was one of the earliest, if not the earliest, settlements in Meeker County. It was also the site of the federal land office — the place where claims from a wide area had to be filed.\n\nMary Lobdell was born in the heavy forests of New York state. She was raised by her parents, particularly her father, so the whole family knew all the essentials about life in the woods, and their daughter was an expert on life in the great outdoors. She hunted, fished and trapped as her contribution to the family’s life far, far from civilization.\n\nHer exploits were famous, and she lived up to her fame as a hunter by bringing as much as 150 deer, 11 bears and innumerable wild cats and foxes as well as hundreds of mink and other animals which were wanted for their skins.\n\nOn one of her hunting expeditions to Pennsylvania she met a fellow who challenged her to a shooting match. If he could out shoot her, she’d have to marry him. She lost the bet and married the winner. It wasn’t long before she realized that she had married a drunk and ran off and left him.\n\nAnd that’s where our story begins.\n\nShe tried to track down her errant husband without much luck. Taking a big step, she started living and dressing as a man, a role she played so well that no one even suspected her gender. Her hunt took her far from New York and Pennsylania, always without success. One version of the story has her working her way near the Mississippi River, and that one dark night the river boat on which she was sailing met and passed another boat on which her erring husband was working. She continued working her way west, giving singing lessons along the way. She worked very hard because she felt her quarry was at hand.\n\nIn Minnesota she worked in a large area reaching from the Lake Minnetonka area to the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nShe kept her disguise as a man, and used the name “LaRoi Lobdell.” The young lady was so successful in this role that one of her neighbors at that time later remembered her as a “hail fellow, well met, and that she had committed no indiscretions” while living and working around the Kandiyohi lakes.\n\nWhen her first winter in Minnesota approached, she began looking for shelter in earnest. A group of people from the St. Paul area had platted land for the capitol of the new state of Minnesota. They needed someone to live on the property to maintain their claim. An older woodsman who was looking for shelter for the winter applied for and got the job. He was told he couldn’t do it alone, so he had to find someone to live with him there during the winter. LaRoi Lobdell, as she still called herself, moved into that cabin with the woodsman and they lived together all winter. He never had the faintest idea that his cabin mate was a woman.\n\nHer disguise worked so well so